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Last Guardian producer Hayama quits for London-based social company

Wednesday, 7th December 2011 11:28 GMT By Johnny Cullen

Executive producer on The Last Guardian, Yoshifusa Hayama, has left Sony for London-based social games company Bossa Studios.

Alongside his EP role on TLG, as well as work on ICO and the Final Fantasy series, Hayama was more recently a VP at Sony Computer Entertainment for four years.

He’ll now join Bossa as its creative director.

“The future of gaming is definitely online and thanks to recent developments with Flash 11, there is no reason why a social game can no longer be as visually stunning and as compelling as the big console titles,” he said.

“Together at Bossa we have plans to bring a plethora of games to Facebook and eventually other appropriate social media channels, which include 3D elements and can be enjoyed by all age and interest groups.”

Hayama’s departure from Sony comes after it was rumoured last week that Team ICO head Fumito Ueda had left the studio, but would continue work on The Last Guardian in a freelance capacity.

Ueda tweeted earlier this week that work on Guardian was continuing, but didn’t address rumours of his departure.

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12 Comments

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  1. Psychotext

    What on earth is going on over there?

    #1 3 years ago
  2. Freek

    Everything except making games :p

    #2 3 years ago
  3. Joe Musashi

    I read this less as a comment about TLG and more as yet another “Producer switches to social media company” which seems to occur about once a week these days.

    Still, whilst there continues to be no official word from trustworthy sources on TLG people are obviously going to make symbolic connections wherever they see fit.

    JM

    #3 3 years ago
  4. tenthousandgothsonacid

    This game is never coming out is it ?

    Bah…

    Oh well, got Journey to look forward to this year.

    And …erm… GTA5 if it’s actually fun.

    Right, new console anyone ?

    #4 3 years ago
  5. The_Red

    Could we say “jumping ship”? Hopefully that’s not the case and this game can end up being a classic on par with Ico and SOTC.

    #5 3 years ago
  6. typeface

    Actually anything could be the case. The first news was rumour which is still unconfirmed unless we treat not answering as leaving.

    To be fair, the executive producer (though it’s normally the producer rather than the exec that would face this scenario) could’ve been fired if a project has been going on for over 6 years and not a lot of progress has been made. I mean think about logically for a second who’s mostly to blame if something takes forever the producers of course moreso than the directors and designers because it’s the producer’s job to get them to work at a pace that’s ideal for both parties. You don’t do that you can either be kindly asked to leave or be fired.

    It’s probably this story that’s been conveyed as the Ueda rumour. Also would explain why all Ueda said was he’s still working on the game which is more important to him than whether he’s with the company or not.

    That said if more key people leave then yeah it’s definitely other signs.

    #6 3 years ago
  7. Clupula

    Yeah, it occurred to me too that this story is probably what got people thinking it was Ueda who left. Probably got out that a big part of Team Ico left Sony and people automatically assumed it was Ueda, when it was actually Hayama.

    #7 3 years ago
  8. Ireland Michael

    Let’s not make this a bigger deal than it is. The guy probably just wanted to move on to something different. A change of pace or a new atmosphere.

    I know it’s nowhere near as fun or interesting or controversial as the other, more apocalyptic story, but reality is pretty boring sometimes, unfortunately.

    There is no reason why this should seriously impact the game’s development.

    #8 3 years ago
  9. Psychotext

    Development has been so glacially paced I’d imagine that nothing short of a nuke could affect it.

    #9 3 years ago
  10. Joe Musashi

    @9 I think that’s a lot of assumption talking. It’s more accurate to say that no information on the game’s progress has been provided for a long time. That doesn’t necessarily mean that no progress has been made.

    And with a game like TLG, based on my personal experiences of ICO and SotC, the less known about it beforehand the better.

    JM

    #10 3 years ago
  11. klewd

    Take it easy. He’s a producer.

    If you know what a producer is, there’s no reason to worry.

    #11 3 years ago
  12. Psychotext

    Who said no progress had been made? I said that development had been glacially paced… which it has been.

    #12 3 years ago