Reports: PS3 hackers banned from PSN after Sony warning

Wednesday, 16 February 2011 17:11 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Following a Sony statement confirming it will issue irreversible PSN bans to those caught running pirated PS3 software, several reports are claiming the process has already begun.

The following email is now apparently being sent to hack-happy users as a warning to remove “all circumvention devices and delete all unauthorized or pirated software from your PlayStation 3 system”:

Important: Access to the PlayStation(R)Network and Access to Qriocity(TM) Services Notice

Unauthorized circumvention devices for PlayStation(R)3 system have been recently released by hackers for the PlayStation(R)3 system. These devices permit the use of unauthorized or pirated software.

Use of such devices or software violates the terms of your “System Software License Agreement for the PlayStation(R)3 System” and the “Terms of Services and User Agreement” for the PlayStation(R)Network/Qriocity(TM) and its Community Code of Conduct provisions. In addition, copying or playing pirated software is a violation of International Copyright Laws.

A circumvention device and/or unauthorized or pirated software currently resides on your PlayStation(R)3 system.

Immediately cease use and remove all circumvention devices and delete all unauthorized or pirated software from your PlayStation(R)3 system. Failure to do so will result in termination of your access to PlayStation(R) Network and access to Qriocity(TM) services through your PlayStation(R)3 system.

Don’t do it, kids. This is what happens.

The following official statement was released by Sony on the matter yesterday:

Unauthorized circumvention devices for the PlayStation 3 system have been recently released by hackers. These devices permit the use of unauthorized or pirated software. Use of such devices or software violates the terms of the “System Software License Agreement for the PlayStation 3 System” and the “Terms of Services and User Agreement” for the PlayStation Network/Qriocity and its Community Code of Conduct provisions. Violation of the System Software Licence Agreement for the PlayStation 3 System invalidates the consumer guarantee for that system. In addition, copying or playing pirated software is a violation of International Copyright Laws. Consumers using circumvention devices or running unauthorized or pirated software will have access to the PlayStation Network and access to Qriocity services through PlayStation 3 system terminated permanently.

To avoid this, consumers must immediately cease use and remove all circumvention devices and delete all unauthorized or pirated software from their PlayStation 3 systems.

According to Sony, hacks and cheats not only “damage our industry,” but can “potentially injure the online experience,” for PSN users.

“By identifying PlayStation 3 systems that breach our guidelines and terminating their ability to connect to PlayStation Network, we are protecting our business and preserving the honest gameplay experiences that you expect and deserve,” reads the statement.

“Rest assured, this message does not apply to the overwhelming majority of our users who enjoy the world of entertainment PlayStation 3 has to offer without breaching the guidelines detailed above, and we urge you to continue doing so without fear.”

Geohot, hot, hot

Back in January, iPhone hacker Geohot published PS3′s root key, while hacker group fail0verflow reverse engineered the system and publicized the feat.

Geohot takin’ on the Sony, yo.

After the information was released online, Sony said it was looking into the claims, and apparently found sufficient evidence to pursue legal action.

While going though the California courts to get a restraining order and the right to confiscate GeoHot’s PC, rumors started swirling the net regarding different ways Sony planned to close the back door on its system.

Once Sony was granted permission to seize all of GeoHot’s hardware used to crack the console, it quickly asked the courts to subpoena YouTube, Twitter, PayPal, Slashdot and various other sites in order to track down several hackers publishing the crack.

Each site, once allowed by the courts, would be forced to provide contact details and personal information on all listed in the court documents.

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