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CD Projekt threatens fines for anyone who illegally downloads Witcher 2

Tuesday, 23rd November 2010 05:19 GMT By Nathan Grayson

witcher24

Don’t feel like paying? You’ll pay for that.

“In quite a few big countries, when people are downloading it illegally they can expect a letter from a legal firm saying, ‘Hey, you downloaded it illegally and right now you have to pay a fine,’” CD Projekt told Eurogamer.

“We are totally fair, but if you decide you will not buy it legally there is a chance you’ll get a letter. We are talking about it right now.”

Eurogamer, however, rightly points out that tracking alleged guilty parties by ISP bill often results in the wrong people getting caught red-handed while the real thieves – who hitched a ride on someone else’s unsecured connection – don’t even get a slap on the wrist.

Even so, CD Projekt thinks this kind of uncompromising crackdown is necessary if we want pirates to quit their looting once and for all.

“I’m sure you’ve heard about stories in the US when recording companies were chasing people. We don’t want to be so harsh, but there is a chance that this might happen to some people if they download illegally. There will be an initiative.”

So, people who read the news that CD Projekt’s releasing The Witcher 2 sans DRM and immediately thought “This’ll be easier than mugging a baby! And only slightly less fun,” here’s your rude awakening. Also, stop stealing things forever and die horribly. Love, VG247.

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4 Comments

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  1. loki

    just lol Most of PC nerds donwnload witcher 2 from torrents,
    fuck you and nothing you can do with it

    #1 3 years ago
  2. klewd

    @1
    Yes they can. Considering how ridiculously easy it is to trace someone downloading using torrents, there’s a lot they can do with it. Besides, they deserve it. PC developers should be supported.

    Just too bad nobody have caught unto usenet yet. It’s probably too difficult to track (?).

    #2 3 years ago
  3. mac

    In that case, am I to assume that they are not interested in the people who get it via newsgroups, etc? Or, is it more to the point that the “ambulance chaser” lawyers just want the easy cash by catching the not so tech savvy torrent’ers?

    In fairness, I enjoyed the first one, and I will buy this – but probably a month after launch when it is sub £20 for the boxed version.

    I really have got to the point now where I see new release prices increasing and increasing, and then reading reviews where you get less and less game – there just isn’t any point in buying new releases on the day of releases for most games now – Especially as the prices often drop to sub £20 in less than a couple of weeks.

    My main gripe is that most PC games are being launched at almost the same price as a console game, yet given all of the DRM we have to put up with, there is no trade in value for a PC game, yet with most console games you can recover ~£25 of the purchase price by trading it in within the month. Given that many games offer less than 10 hours of game play then PC buyers are really being shafted.

    Fair play to CD Projekt for trying something different to the usual DRM infestation we get offered, which offers no protection to the developer/publisher as the games are normally cracked before release, and the pirates get a better experience as they don’t have to put up with jumping through hoops to get their game to run because of the nightmare DRM.

    I hope that their experiment proves a success, and they sell a lot of units – then other developers/publishers may just see sense and stop wasting their development budget on useless DRM which just turns a proportion of the potential buyers away.

    #3 3 years ago
  4. Vodos

    Unlike torrent, Usenet isn’t a P2P system. With torrent they can just seed themselves and write down all the IPs that download from them.
    To get data from Usenet they’d have to petition it from the server hosters/providers and I imagine most if not all will tell them to fuck off.
    Many of the paid Usenet servers also offer full SSL encryption nowadays, so even your ISP can’t rat you out because they don’t know what you downloaded.

    #4 3 years ago