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Candy Crush Saga studio King filing for IPO in US, company reportedly worth $5 billion

Friday, 27th September 2013 13:47 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Candy Crush Saga studio King is reportedly filed an initial public offering with the US Securities and Exchange Commission, according to The Telegraph. According to the report, the UK-based company could be valued at around $5 billion. Back in August,it was reported that King was making £400,000 a day from Candy Crush Saga on just Facebook. Swimming it in they are. Thanks, Develop.

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10 Comments

  1. pukem0n

    they’ll share Zyngas fate soon enough…

    #1 10 months ago
  2. TheWulf

    I honestly already have a strong distaste for them. I can respect a company like Rovio because they’re not all about tricking people into spending money. That’s exactly what Candy Crush Saga does, though. BoingBoing wrote a pretty nice article about it a bit back, and it’s definitely worth the time spent reading.

    It essentially reminds me of the operant conditioning tricks that MMOs like WoW use to keep you paying a monthly subscription. And WoW is so good at behavioural conditioning that a WoW player will cuss you out and go to about any depth to mock you if you even mention this. I’ve seen this happen on VG24/7, and it’s how a few fellow posters learned to hate me. (I don’t beat around the bullshit bush for the sake of their sensitivities, it’s better that they know sooner rather than later.)

    I just don’t like games that trick people, it really is bull. It’s utter bull. You could just try and make a game that’s fun and have it stand entirely by its own merits. The reason I fell so very much in love with Saints Row IV is because Volition did just that.

    If you read what was most loved about that game by the critics who reviewed it, they all agree that it’s one of the most fun games to have been released in the past few years. (Perhaps even in the past decade.)

    So you can make a game that’s fun, or you can make a game that’s designed to behaviourally condition people instead of making a game that’s fun. I won’t respect the latter, I can’t. It’s predatory, it’s horrible, and it’s effectively brain-rape because the player isn’t aware of what’s happening, and they’ve spent money before they know what’s going on.

    I just wish people were more aware about these things so that these tricks wouldn’t take hold in the first place.

    #2 10 months ago
  3. TheWulf

    @1

    I really, really hope so. I disagree with their business practises as much as I do Zynga’s. Don’t get me wrong, there are mobile developers out there who have absolutely no interest in conditioning their audience, and they make the best games. Yet far too many are out for a quick buck, often made in really dishonest ways.

    #3 10 months ago
  4. dizzygear

    Isn’t Candy Crush pretty much a Bejeweled rip off?

    #4 10 months ago
  5. TheWulf

    @4

    Sort of. Except they pull shenanigans with it so that it has random spikes in difficulty. Honestly, I’d just recommend Bejewelled instead.

    #5 10 months ago
  6. Ireland Michael

    @2 “It essentially reminds me of the operant conditioning tricks that MMOs like WoW use to keep you paying a monthly subscription. And WoW is so good at behavioural conditioning that a WoW player will cuss you out and go to about any depth to mock you if you even mention this. I’ve seen this happen on VG24/7, and it’s how a few fellow posters learned to hate me. (I don’t beat around the bullshit bush for the sake of their sensitivities, it’s better that they know sooner rather than later.)”

    Don’t flatter yourself buddy. Nobody hates you. We just think you’re a self obsessed egomaniac with a raging superiority complex who likes to overthink everything and put everyone down all the time.

    I played WoW when it took my fancy. An hour here, an hour there. The game has become so casualified in recent years that you can literally log in to it for maybe two hours a WEEK and *still* get raid gear.

    But hey, who cares about facts, right?

    When I got bored, I stopped playing.

    Your ego-gratifying theory is utter bullshit, sorry to inform you.

    #6 10 months ago
  7. DSB

    Hahaha. 5 billion! Nine zeroes.

    Holy mother of fuck are some people gonna get burnt BAD.

    #7 10 months ago
  8. TheWulf

    @6

    Don’t flatter yourself buddy. Nobody hates you.

    And? I was just pointing out a possibility.

    We just think you’re a self obsessed egomaniac with a raging superiority complex who likes to overthink everything and put everyone down all the time.

    Are you describing me or you, here? That description fits you like a glove, perhaps better than I. At least I don’t go cussing everyone down all the time, going straight for personal attacks. While some of that may be true (especially the overthinking part, which I admit to), I’m not as vile a human being.

    I mean, honestly, the royal ‘We’ too? Who has an overstated sense of self-importance, here? I think you’re upset because I remind you of you, just not quite so horrible.

    The game has become so casualified in recent years that you can literally log in to it for maybe two hours a WEEK and *still* get raid gear.

    And yet there are many players who’ve played it more. There are reports of horrible things that have happened. It’s sad that I have to link the news article about how a mother became so obsessed with the game that she let her daughter die of starvation.

    I’d say that’s compelling evidence, right there.

    There’s plenty of anecdotal experience I have with it too, as I’ve seen people throw away their lives for WoW. Though I know you’ve got all the empathy of a rock, so you wouldn’t give a damn about that. As I said, vile.

    But hey, who cares about facts, right?

    I’ve linked plenty of articles about people who’ve died or let other people die thanks to WoW. I’m not the one who disregards facts in favour of delusion, that tends to be the WoW fans.

    And I’m not the one being an apologist for a game that uses operant conditioning so well that people have died because of it. It’s always nice having the moral high ground, and I have it once again. That doesn’t make me superior, it just means that I don’t have a sense of ethics with morality holes that one could drive a starship through.

    Your ego-gratifying theory is utter bullshit, sorry to inform you.

    You might want to tell that to proponents of Burrhus Skinner’s theories and BoingBoing. Both of whom I’d deem as being smarter than either of us. See how far that gets you.

    But I suspect you’d be a bit too gutless to take it up with them. And that’s how I see you for spewing so much rage over a topic that clearly has emotional weight with me. I see you as kind of pathetic, and not a very good human being at all.

    No matter what I am, as horrible as I might be, I’m better than you because at least I care. Take that as you will.

    #8 10 months ago
  9. TheWulf

    I’d honestly cite a lack of education and the arrogance in believing that we’re any different than other animals within the animal kingdom as being the reasons behind why we’re even having this discussion. It’s been shown time and time again that a human being can be conditioned.

    So I found a video which explains it eloquently, you can find that here. I, myself, have had experience with this. I’ve watched people become so engrossed in these MMO schedules that they give them priority above their work, their social life, or anything else. I’ve lost two good friends to WoW, friends who no longer talk to anyone unless that person is playing WoW.

    As I said, no reason why Michael or anyone else should care, as I know empathy isn’t something that gamers have in abundance. But I’ve seen it for myself, and it’s folly to assume that just because someone doesn’t affect one person, it doesn’t affect another. That means that people whom this doesn’t have any effect upon who’re trying to get others into the game are equivalent to, say, a Typhoid Mary.

    So, yes, I’m well educated on this topic and my ethics disagrees with how some games try to condition people. I don’t think that’s okay. It’s lead people to die even and that’s an irrefutable fact.

    It’s like smoking in the ’50s, no one wants to admit it’s a problem, even though to some it obviously is.

    So this is what I’m offering to the conversation. I’m not cussing people out or going for personal attacks, I’m explaining what my personal stake in this is. That I’ve seen it happen, myself, and I don’t like it. It’s like having seen someone fall prey to a terminal illness, and then being told that that illness doesn’t exist.

    It’s essentially cognitive cannibalism on part of the developers responsible. I don’t think it’s ethical, I don’t at all. I speak out against things that I perceive as wrong, and because of that I have someone doing the equivalent of screaming insults at me in guttural grunts. Which, honestly, I feel strengthens my position.

    I see no genuine, valid arguments here other than the one I’m making, logically. I see insults, yes, but they tend to be the last refuge of the desperate.

    I often present this argument and I’m met with attacks and bitter hatred, because people don’t like thinking about ever having had a problem. It makes me wonder if Michael has other problems too, which perhaps it’s why it’s a sore spot for him. Have you ever had problems with alcoholism, Michael? If so, you should understand that addiction is a real thing, and not something you should defend.

    But I think you’ll just want to shout some more, attack some more, and generally be vile. As opposed to actually dealing with my argument.

    #9 10 months ago
  10. yeoung

    @TheWulf:

    At what point though, does personal responsibility become a factor? Would you advocate, just to stay with your smoking example, that ‘some’ games should have discouraging warning labels on them like those found on packs of cigarettes?

    Games that are designed to keep you playing and succeed in that aspect are well-designed games. Maybe more akin to a consumerist product than an expression of art, possibly banking on an innate sense for instant gratification, but this practice is so ingrained into modern day life that focusing on MMO’s and casual games in particular seems a bit misguided.

    I’m not disputing the fact that a mother let her daughter die because of a game, but perhaps placing the blame with a 3-in-a-row game is entirely too simple and ill-advised. I do however have little sympathy given that the argument you seem to make is that the design of a game is responsible for the actions taken by people.

    If a father is too engrossed in stuntbiking to spend time with his kids, and ends up neglecting them to the point where health issues arise, would you be as keen to scapegoat manufacturers of bikes pleading that they ‘just make em too darn fun to ride’ or what you consider the man to be a terrible father to begin with?

    /0.02

    #10 10 months ago

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