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Guild Wars 2 turns one, has shifted 3.5 million copies

Wednesday, 28th August 2013 14:34 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Guild Wars 2 celebrates its first anniversary today, and as part of the celebration, NCSoft and ArenaNet have released an infographic full of lovely numbers.

“So much has happened in the past twelve months that sometimes it’s hard for me to believe that it was just one year ago today that we launched Guild Wars 2”, wrote ArenaNet president Mike O’Brien in a blog post today.

“If you haven’t joined us yet, there’s never been a better time. Whether you’d rather wage war in epic battles with hundreds of players, test your skills against fellow players in our competitive PvP scene, or just explore a vast world that offers new surprises every time you log in, I invite you to check out Guild Wars 2 today”.

According to the information posted in the graphic, the game has sold 3.5 million copies and has had 460,000 peak concurrent users.

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6 Comments

  1. GrimRita

    Great stats! I went back to GW2 over the weekend and actually had a blast in WvW. However, some of the items for sale in the store are very over priced. A Mining pick is like 800 gems – thats like £8

    Im going to keep playing until I see what Wildstar is like because GW2 is simply beautiful and the daily patches require no time down, just a client restart – so they have finally got their act together there.

    #1 1 year ago
  2. DSB

    Why so little love for the mesmer? That’s like the coolest class ever!

    I will kill you…. with ACTING.

    #2 1 year ago
  3. Sethos

    Terrible, boring game.

    #3 1 year ago
  4. Tr0n

    Why so little love for Charr? They’re the best race! :)

    #4 1 year ago
  5. TheWulf

    @4

    I think it’s because charr fans (like myself) got fed up and left, I think the asura fans will be next.

    The problem is is that the game is designed to be accommodating to people who want the typical high fantasy experience, but it forgets what it is. So it becomes all too generic, too quickly. The asura, for example, were creatures of high magicks, respectable and quite noble, now they’re sociopathic gnomes that tell Yo Mama jokes. And what’s worse is that the asura aesthetic is obviously borrowed from Phantasy Star Online. That’s painful for past asura fans like myself who remember the venerable race they used to be.

    Now, I’m also a charr fan. What’s my beef with the charr? The lack of consistency in the world. In one zone they’re getting their furry rears handed to them by ghosts and human rebels. Why? They could be rolling tank patrols through that area to just nuke them silly. They have plenty of tanks, so why are they not using them? They also have cars which they could do drive by shootings with.

    Speaking of cars — sure they work fine off-road, but where are the roads that would make it easier for them to drive? The fact that the charr are so advanced, yet haven’t even figured out to make roads as well as the ancient Romans is a painful anachronism.

    And in the Shatterer battle, materials needed to repair high-tech weaponry are delivered via means which came right out of the dark ages. Why? Why would they do that? Why not lay down train tracks and have these materials be delivered by an armoured train with a chaingun mounted on top? Frankly, I’d prefer to be situated on top of a bullet train with a chaingun, than escorting the equivalent of a horse & carriage. Why is this so?

    Then there are other irritations. The vertical progression angle means that you can be an amazing warrior who’s taken out legions of Flame Legion platoons, and then if you step into a higher level area you’ll be taken down in one strike by an angry wild lynx. Yes, a lynx. That’s an immersion breaker right there. You’d expect them to ramp it up in later zones, like Champions Online and such does, you shouldn’t be fighting weaker-looking mobs than you were in the starting area.

    But that’s part of the deceit of GW2, it starts out cool and then it gets very, very generic. You go from dealing with Flame Legion platoons to dealing with wild animals. The thing is though is that even from the first moment you step out of the Black Citadel and you observe the obvious lack of roads, you can tell that this game wasn’t designed coherently. It’s like it was designed by teams who never talked to each other, and they just awkwardly plopped down stuff other teams had made into the environment, with nothing connecting them.

    Ultimately it just feels generic.

    What’s worse is that the writing isn’t great, and the writing becomes terrible towards the end of the game. At the end, you have a self-insert Gary Stu named Trahearne who’s perhaps the most obnoxious, wooden, and one-dimensional character I’ve ever met. All I could think at the time is how much I wanted to join the Elder Dragons so that I could help take him down. See, at the end of the game I was expecting Destiny’s Edge to reunite and lead us. I was expecting to take orders from Rytlock, Zojja, and Eir. Instead I get a trumped up Gary Stu.

    That was the straw that broke the camel’s back, for me. I just couldn’t play it any more because the writing had gotten to a point where it was so much worse than anything else I’d ever played. To be fair to The Secret World, whilst the plot is hokey in that MMO and filled with problems and holes, it’s nowhere near as bad as what happened in Guild Wars 2. Nowhere near. My goodness me, no. Nowhere near.

    Because… strike a light, it was bad. So bad.

    And why’d the charr fans leave? One word: Armour. The asura have it almost as bad as the charr do, but the charr have it worse. See, there’s clipping everywhere, it’s not just the lack of tail-holes on armours that they promised to have in place, that’s not the worst of it. It just feels like most armours were just cheaply reshaped for the other races. So they look terrible on both the asura and the charr. Whilst that’s fine for WoW fans who care nothing for the appearance of their avatar, for the rest of us it’s enough to make you stop playing the game.

    So those who were playing it to play as a charr, an asura, or possibly even a sylvari will be grossly put off by the armours. The armours look fine on human and norn, which was their baseline, but you can see how they start to get iffy on the sticklike sylvari, then worse on the tiny asura, then worse again on the charr.

    So ultimately, it’s just the lack of visual aesthetics, the lack of good world design, and the lack of decent writers that killed GW2 for me. The game is fun, no doubt. I mean, dynamic events and jumping puzzles are a blast. But the elements that drove me away from the game left me anywhere between cringing and wanting to weep openly.

    It’s sad to see what could have been a good game ruined in such a way.

    Guh. Trahearne. What were they smoking? Asbestos?

    And it frustrates me so much because the game under all that trash is good. I don’t want this to become a failure, and to think that the mechanics or the financial model are bad. They aren’t. @_@ That’s what makes this game so infuriating. The game is good, the financial model is good, it’s just the everything else that’s bad. It’s hard to explain to someone that a game has a revolutionary feel to gameplay, but has world design and writing that’s either on par with or worse than WoW’s.

    I still feel as I always did about the gameplay. The game I played in the betas is there, it’s brilliant. It’s just… oh gods, the area design, the armour design, and the writing. The fucking writing… X_X

    #5 1 year ago
  6. KineticCalvaria

    @5, Christ, like you really needed to add more to that comment.

    Read the initial one and yes you do have some good points about the consistency, but no way am I reading that essay again.

    #6 1 year ago

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