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Thief developer Eidos Montreal confirms a number of lay-offs

Tuesday, 4th March 2014 21:24 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Thief developer Eidos Montreal has confirmed a number of lay-offs at the studio.

Speaking with Kotaku, the developer confirmed it let 27 employees go today.

“It is true we’ve let 27 people go today, unfortunately it’s something that every major studio has to do sometimes in order to ensure you have the right set up for current and future projects,” read the statement.

“It’s never a nice thing to do but we are genuinely trying to offer as much support as much as we can.

“We’re trying to re-locate as many people as possible into other roles here or at our other studios and we’ve been in touch several studios in Montreal to arrange a career day for those affected by this. We’re very thankful for all their hard work and we sincerely wish them well.”

Eidos did not state whether the employee were temporary staffers to aid in development of Thief or if they were permanent employees.

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2 Comments

  1. TheWulf

    It’s something that every studio needs to do? You mean, like Double Fine? Or Valve? Oh, wait…

    In fact, the only time Valve laid off people in recent memory was around 25 people who were making arses out of themselves in attempting to turn Valve into Google, which Gabe was having none off. I suppose that’s the blessing and the curse of a work culture like that, is that sometimes you’ll have people who abuse it.

    And Double Fine has this same culture. It’s just kind of a nerd commune of game makers, and Tim hates seeing people go. He doesn’t ever fire anyone unless it’s absolutely necessary, at the point where he has no choice because the company literally doesn’t have enough money to pay the wages. Which is why Tim’s had to be clever in bringing in new money, and this is also why I like giving Double Fine my money.

    If Double Fine keeps making money, Tim pretty much never has to fire anyone, and that works out well for their culture. More people means more creativity. That’s just one of the reasons I love DF.

    So, I really hate this notion that the layoffs are necessary. They actually aren’t. At all. The publically owned publishers just happen to be really cheap and hate maintaining jobs when they’re not working on a money-making project. And this is unavoidably true because there are examples where this doesn’t happen. They just hate losing any money which they feel is ‘unnecessary to lose,’ so they’re pink slip-happy, so to speak.

    Keep these people on until we need them on projects, or fire them now and save the money we’d otherwise be paying them. Hmmm. Loyalty be damned! Fire! Fire! Fire!

    #1 6 months ago
  2. ududy

    @TheWulf

    “Keep these people on until we need them on projects, or fire them now and save the money we’d otherwise be paying them. Hmmm. Loyalty be damned! Fire! Fire! Fire!”

    Indeed. Let them work on small, creative side projects until they are needed for a bigger one. It will pay dividends in the end.

    #2 6 months ago

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