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Tomb Raider handed a 90/100 by GamesMaster

Saturday, 23rd February 2013 21:24 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

The first review for Tomb Raider has come to light, courtesy of the latest issue of GamesMaster magazine.

According to the monthly: “Sitting back exhausted we were left with just one question dribbling forth from our gaping jaws. How on earth are they going to top this in the sequel? Because of one thing there can be no doubt. Lara is back.”

The magazine said it will take 10-15 hours to finish the main campaign, but if you want to explore the entire island, prepare to mark 20 hours off your schedule.

It was awarded a 90/100.

Tomb Raider is due on PC, PS3 and Xbox 360 March 5.

Via:GamesMaster Twitter, Gaming Everything.

Thanks, Hives.

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32 Comments

  1. Night Hunter

    Is it weird that I expected a higher number than 90/100, this being a world exclusive review and all … ;)

    #1 1 year ago
  2. DSB

    Part of me thinks it looks good, and part of me thinks it looks very mediocre. I can’t totally reconcile myself with that.

    Regardless, a review that sneaks under an embargo isn’t the most trustworthy source in the world.

    @1 It’s probably just enough to publish it early without being sued or blacklisted. Convenient, no?

    #2 1 year ago
  3. Night Hunter

    Well, they do advertise it as a world exclusive. So I’m thinking maybe they were allowed to publish this early

    http://www.abload.de/img/tomb_raider_gamesmastuos5n.jpg

    #3 1 year ago
  4. Erthazus

    I think it’s going to be like Deus Ex:HR

    It will recieve good scores and will be packed with goods, but it’s going to be mediocre in every aspect of the gameplay.

    I’m not sold on Tomb Raider because I still believe it’s an Uncharted Rip off.

    #4 1 year ago
  5. DSB

    @3 That just makes it even dirtier though. You best believe Squeenix isn’t gonna give that right to someone who scores it 5/10 :P

    #5 1 year ago
  6. Abdo shniba

    @#4 you now that this so called “uncharted” ripoff existed since 1996, more than a decade ago ;).

    #6 1 year ago
  7. Takeshi

    @4: It’s going to be way more open-world/exploring~ish, you can upgrade different stuff and there is multiple ways to go about an encounter. Sure, they may have taken notes from Naughty Dog’s franchise, but IMO, they’re doing so many things correctly that it doesn’t bother me. It would have been way worse if they just did an Uncharted~ish game with Lara as the main character instead of Nathan Drake.

    I hope it gets similar scores when other sites go live with their reviews. I definitely have a good feeling about this game which is why I already dared pre-order it.

    #7 1 year ago
  8. Edo

    The review embargo ends up this Monday…a whole week before the games’s release which is a balsy move from Square Enix, and I for one can’t wait for this game.

    #8 1 year ago
  9. Jerykk

    @4 Not sure what you’re talking about. DX:HR was great and most DX fans thought it was a worthy entry to the series. Conversely, I highly doubt that any fans will consider the new TR to be a worthy entry to the series. It looks like it’s being designed to appeal to people who never liked TR in the first place (hence the emphasis on combat and streamlined puzzle and traversal elements), whereas DX:HR was clearly catered to fans of the series.

    #9 1 year ago
  10. salarta

    Not really much of a shocker. 3rd Birthday got a little under half of its scores above 75 (Metacritic re-scaling), DmC got 58 out of 61 reviews at a score above 75, and Resident Evil 6 also had just under half of its reviews above 75 as well. In addition, most of the reviews for 3rd Birthday prove that reviewers are almost entirely focused on the gameplay, and the perception of Tomb Raider as a dead franchise means just about any kind of change is guaranteed to blow people away.

    That, and the new Lara as she starts out fits how both men and women think adult women should behave in their natural element, and fitting modern cultural assumptions is par for the course. It’s why older films get remakes instead of re-releases, because companies know people can’t appreciate the past, but need to have it redefined through modern day ideas.

    #10 1 year ago
  11. DSB

    @8 I didn’t know that, good info. That is definitely admirable.

    #11 1 year ago
  12. ninjanutta

    Its already leaked on p2p sites for x360 so no doubt we will hear lots more in coming days…Sounds good so far anyway and an uncharted rip off is fine by me,in fact anything close to uncharted is very welcome in my book.Im gutted that my jtag 360 is not here at the moment but im waiting to get the pc version anyway…end of the gen is looking great so far

    #12 1 year ago
  13. Moonwalker1982

    You guys forgot to mention pretty much the best news of all!!!

    The magazine also enjoyed the “vivid” hubs and final third of the game “with its spectacular bombast”. GamesMaster wished Tomb Raider included more side tombs, but the ones present in the game are a joy to discover. For those wondering: there aren’t many quick time events.

    NOT MANY QTE!

    Something a lot of people complained about and expected lots of them.

    #13 1 year ago
  14. manamana

    I guess I’ll decide to order Lara’s reboot on monday then.

    #14 1 year ago
  15. Zana

    I like that “Lara is back” bit. Did she go anywhere? Because the last Tomb Raider game, Underworld, was very good. I’m really not into this whole reboot thing. They should have kept TR as an adventure game first and foremost, not an Uncharted clone.

    #15 1 year ago
  16. Da Man

    Uncharted was just a Re4 plus Gears of War plus shitty platforming, so anyway..

    #16 1 year ago
  17. OrbitMonkey

    I wonder if they’ve included any Indiana Jones or Uncharted easter eggs?

    It’d be cool to get to use the classic bullwhip, or find Nate’s corpse.

    #17 1 year ago
  18. salarta

    It’s kind of sad that the real Lara Croft is no longer appreciated, but it’s just the way times change. One generation appreciates superheroes like Superman that are symbols of virtue, the next generation wants to see them broken and destroyed and considers characters like Batman to be the only good heroes because they’re morally questionable. Likewise, women used to want to be seen as just as capable of being strong and brave as men and men were eager to support that, but this generation of women want to be known as inherently weak and cowardly and men agree with that assessment.

    Which I guess I don’t really have a right to complain, each generation can decide how they want to have their culture, gender, race, etc perceived and defined. If they want every single video game starring a female character to show her acting weak and pathetic when she’s introduced while men continue to be depicted as naturally strong and brave as the superior sex, that’s their deal, they just have to be prepared for it just like they had to be prepared for seeing all the survival horror franchises turned into action/FPS ones in the wake of Gears of War and Call of Duty.

    #18 1 year ago
  19. OrbitMonkey

    ^ what? You realise that by the end of the game you’ll have slaughtered hordes of big strong men, right?

    Oh and that starting weak & becoming strong is a kind of standard for male superheroes too? Captain America, Spiderman and Green Arrow for example.

    In fact Lara’s origin story here, is almost identical to Green Arrows.

    Before riding in on your noble steed White Knight, you maybe want to check your facts.

    #19 1 year ago
  20. salarta

    @20: I’ve checked my facts. The script was written by Rihanna Pratchett who in the cases people mention her they usually emphasize she’s a woman rather than that she wrote games like Mirror’s Edge. Last I saw of Green Arrow’s origin, he didn’t start out on the verge of tears and utterly terrified, nor did he require a mix of female aggression and tutoring by a woman (the flip side of this game) to learn how to become tough. Green Arrow is comic books whereas Lara Croft is video games, and lastly, Green Arrow isn’t in a medium where most protagonists are female and depicted as naturally strong and brave while men are hardly depicted, and if they are, hardly depicted in such a way. Lara Croft is in a medium where almost all protagonists are male and depicted as strong, smart, tough and brave naturally, whereas all the iconic women have been either demoted to damsel in distress and support (Jill and Claire of RE), or redefined as overly emotional, weak, scared little girls at heart (Samus Aran and Aya Brea).

    I don’t think it can really be called “White Knighting” when this is what women want. It’s like calling someone a White Knight for “rescuing” a woman from a BDSM club she voluntarily and happily entered. Rihanna wants it, Brenna wants it, several female commenters want it, so it’s clear this is how women want their whole sex to be defined: that while men can be naturally strong and brave, women need training and trauma to learn how to be the way men already are when they reach adulthood.

    No, that’s not realistic, but it’s the message being sent, and they seem happy about it, so all power to them. It’s just going to take me some time to adjust to the new way for gender relations, so sorry that you may have to bear with me while I set my mind straight; I have a couple decades of seeing women as equals to reconcile. I try to remind myself that all the coming hentai of scared fragile Lara will help me change my attitude faster, and that I don’t really have to worry about anything I make being considered sexist since women will see themselves as needing men to define them into something greater.

    #20 1 year ago
  21. Da Man

    Get a life ffs..

    #21 1 year ago
  22. OrbitMonkey

    @21, oh-kay… Though having your 2 decades of treating women as equals, overturned by what you’ve read about a videogame depiction of Lara Croft, doesn’t portray you as someone of principle… Or intelligence…

    “Wait, all these years I’ve been giving my cat tinned food, when actually he’s wanted lasagne?!”

    Fictions just fiction, like, y’know?

    #22 1 year ago
  23. salarta

    @23: Well, there are a couple things I have to say there.

    First, it’s not entirely just this reboot and how it treats Lara Croft, it’s the whole industry and how women react to depiction of their sex within it. I saw almost no women complain about 3rd Birthday, Other M, or how Jill and Claire were treated in RE5 and RE:Degeneration. In fact, I see women praising those games, and cosplaying as those redefined versions of the characters, not their original depictions. The guaranteed success of this game just made me realize I was ignorantly defending the interests and values of the previous generation, and as a man at that. I’m male, it’s not my “duty” to “defend” or decide how women should be depicted and treated in society, that’s up to women.

    In the face of women neither complaining about these recent depictions, nor of women or anyone complaining that male protagonists in the industry aren’t also portrayed in the “realistic” way that this game is pursuing, there aren’t many explanations available. I’m trying to force myself to accept the one that makes the most sense to me. We already know from recent studies that women see their gender as objects, after all.

    Fiction is a tricky subject. I don’t think it’s worth killing or seriously hurting someone over, but it has more power than people are willing to admit. You can tell that just by looking at how crazy fanboys can get, and it’s not because they have mental problems (though many do), it’s because fiction can both reflect the culture and shape how people see the world. It’s why book burnings happen, knowledge is knowledge whether it’s facts in an encyclopedia or perspectives in a work of fiction. Kids look up to superheroes despite it being fiction.

    #23 1 year ago
  24. DSB

    “Fictions just fiction, like, y’know?”

    Nobody expects the feminist inquisition.

    #24 1 year ago
  25. salarta

    @25: Or snakes.

    Really though, I don’t fit the criteria of a feminist for several reasons.

    #25 1 year ago
  26. OrbitMonkey

    ^ oh I was thinking you were making an issue of women being depicted in a negatory light, turns out your just another guy, justifying why women ain’t equal.

    “they don’t complain enough, they wear sexy clothes!”

    Eesh… Take #22′s advice.

    #26 1 year ago
  27. salarta

    @27: There are a lot of reasons I don’t think I can be considered a feminist, and I think that calling me one is unfair to actual feminists. I don’t want to potentially hurt the way some people perceive feminists by people associating me with them.

    I don’t have a problem with women wearing sexy clothes, I loved and own both Bayonetta and Lollipop Chainsaw, you’re jumping to your own conclusions.

    #27 1 year ago
  28. partchimp

    Sorry, a lot of people are getting very uptight, emotional and argumentative over…. Tomb raider??!

    From what I’ve seen it looks of acceptable quality, i frankly couldn’t care less if it’s an appropriate representation of “THE” lara croft or a modern woman or whatever.

    #28 1 year ago
  29. Rafa_L

    @19 salarta. I see your point, and I agree that many people think like that, but I don’t think it’s a general tought. I don’t like superheroes like superman, symbols of virtue because it’s unrealistic to me. “Really, you are talking about realism in superheroes?” Yes, every universe has its rules, the creator can choose to create something like our society with tweaks, or create a world of pure imagination, but it will always follow rules. I think something our generation is seeing is the humanization of heroes, sometimes they lose, they suffer, they bleed and they struggle. I really like that, and that’s not really dependent on the morals of the character.

    On that line of thought, I 100% agree with a Tomb Raider reboot, I wanted to live Laras traumatic experience, I want to see her in danger and I want to help her overcome it.

    On the other hand, I have serious criticism on the Lara we were introduced, first, I hate her voice so much. Sounds to me like a scared teen brat. I expect her to cry and fear, but in the line of what we saw in Kill Bill, Beatrix was a mother crying and fighting for her baby, struggling with love for a man and her child, things that are part of women universe, but not once she stopped being badass, not because of her “superpowers” but because of her attitude in front of fear and loss, we see her desperately crying, but she is not a victim. I don’t see that in Lara, and when I see videos of her defeating various strong man, it becomes unbelievable not because she’s so fragile and a woman, but it’s incoherent with the Lara we see in trailers. If only they gave her a strong womans voice, or an actress that could express attitude even in desperation.

    @20 I love the idea of seeing a character going from weak to strong, but remember captain america before becoming strong? What changed was his skills, not his personality. Spiderman faced choices, wrong decisions, doubt, and was immature, but has he ever acted as fragile as we see Lara in trailers?

    @23 Fiction is not just fiction, it has great power, it can expose our society and influence it. You really think movies, books and fiction haven’t defined generations, behaviors, public opinion… Fiction is life.

    @27 I don’t think that’s Salarta way of thinking, actually, what I sense from his speech is he kind of mourning “girl power” because of some disappointments. On the point that it’s up to woman to decide how they wanna be seen, I agree with Salarta. Many woman would rather be a porn star rather than president, a housewife instead of a CEO, all should be respected, but society will judge, it depends on them to define wich behavior will be judged.

    @29 We can’t care about everything, but if you like video games, you are on a site like this, if you are going to play this game, give a thought to it. Kids will play it, the same kids that will one day interact with your daughter. I’m not saying you have to agree with me or whoever, but just care.

    Anyway, I played all tomb raiders, it was the first game I loved and it will take a lot for me to give up on the franchise.

    #29 1 year ago
  30. tmac2011

    i really cant wait for this tomb raider looks like they put alot of work into it, some people cant understand its the begining of lara croft

    #30 1 year ago
  31. salarta

    @30: I don’t like the “I want to see Lara’s traumatic experience and help her overcome it” line of thinking. I’m not saying you “can’t” think that way, only that I disagree with it. I feel like this whole business of “You’re protecting Lara,” “You’re helping Lara,” is antithetical to the whole idea of woman as self-sufficient person. You don’t really see people say “I want to protect Kratos” or “I want to help Solid Snake complete his mission.” I found that the more irksome part of comments made by the misinformed producer that talked about rape.

    I’m just going to miss strong, capable women in video games. Lara Croft was THE icon of female empowerment, and now we’re going to see every single female video game character that ever had a video game treated the same way. That’s not paranoia, that’s reality, it’s what happened to survival horror when the action/FPS genre took over. We have precedent, we have example, and I’m a little depressed because I thought women wanted to be seen as equals and now they don’t, they want men and the next generation of girls to think women can’t be strong, smart, resourceful or courageous unless a man introduces those concepts to them. When the woman that played Uhura got on Star Trek, she was praised and considered such an icon because she was a black woman placed in a position of equality and an inspiration for breaking barriers, but today we have even women spurning the whole concept of woman as equal to man.

    I don’t think any of the people that made the game or are supporting it understand what they’re doing. In the effort to make Lara “more realistic,” I think they’re setting perception of women back by decades. We had the concept of emotional breaking from fragile creature to badass in I Spit On Your Grave back in the 70s, Lara Croft didn’t need to be turned into a lesser offshoot of that.

    I don’t like the way society is changing here, and I’m trying to make sense of why women would devalue themselves and love doing so after decades of trying to prove they can be just as naturally capable as men. Everyone else sees just one game in one franchise, I see one icon changing how all icons are viewed and treated for a whole generation and possibly every generation to come. Even if Crystal Dynamics rushes the scared little girl phase and never refers back to her origin story in future games, the success of this game is going to make every single publisher turn every single strong female protagonist into women just like her. Little girls are going to grow up thinking their gender is defined by cowardice and weakness and they need to pursue a man to teach them to break past their natural shortcomings.

    And I’m not really getting anything out of this except getting my disappointments out. This game is going to sell millions, probably more than Resident Evil 6, I knew this months ago. They could say or do anything right now no matter how terrible it is and they’ll still rake in the money, and it’s because they’ve successfully hit on what society wants. Society doesn’t want strong women or women as equals, it wants women as victims and objects, and that makes me the bad guy for not wanting that to happen.

    #31 1 year ago
  32. Vice

    Good. 9/10 is what I expected really. About 15 hrs is also what I expected. No let downs so far.
    And how would they top it in sequel? They’ll just change locations and upgrade graphics. That’s how.

    #32 1 year ago

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