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Dyson inventor cautions UK Government’s fixation on games, warns of potential skill shortage

Thursday, 10th January 2013 10:19 GMT By Dave Cook

Sir James Dyson – creator of the Dyson Vacuum – has expressed concern that the rise of gaming’s popularity, and the Government’s recent efforts to support the sector is detracting from traditional manufacturing routes and career paths.

In an interview with Radio Times, Dyson claimed that nine out of ten UK graduates were leaving the UK to work abroad upon finishing their studies and stated that the glamour of the games industry is shifting the focus away from engineering and science vocations. He advised that the UK Government do more to support both field so that Britain could continue to compete on an international level.

It comes as tax relief was finally pledged by the UK Government following years of lobbying and campaign drives from the industry and by its supporters, such as TIGA. Despite the campaign’s positive impact on the gaming sector, Dyson claimed that the Government had now grown obsessed with it.

What’s your view on the issue? Are traditional – and most importantly, vital – manufacturing roles being overlooked as more and more students pursue jobs within gaming? Is there danger of a skills shortage? Let us know what you think below.

Thanks Develop.

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11 Comments

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  1. viralshag

    I think this might be a little bit of an over-reaction. I don’t think everyone going to Uni to learn about science, math and engineering is doing so with the aim of getting into the game industry.

    However, going overseas for jobs is most likely a more real problem… if you actually consider it a problem. Working and living in the UK, especially in London or some of the other large cities, is just not worth it in comparison to what you can get elsewhere.

    #1 1 year ago
  2. Dave Cook

    @1 I’m with you on that yeah. He has a point that maybe games – seeming like a more glamorous career than say, vacuum engineering, may make more graduates favour it. But to claim the Government is obsessed by it is a bit of a stretch.

    #2 1 year ago
  3. viralshag

    @2, Not only that but I can’t actually see the overlap of the two. Engineering and games design? I’m sure by university you’re specialising into a particular type engineering, be it civil, mechanical or electrical engineering.

    Again, I just don’t see how that would link into gaming unless there has been a significant drop in applications for engineering degrees and a sharp rise in game-related degrees.

    #3 1 year ago
  4. friendlydave

    I could understand if engineering graduates couldn’t get jobs and they take up programming, but it;s not like its easy to get work in the gaming industry either.

    Unless all these engineering graduates are developing mobile games.

    @2 agreed.

    #4 1 year ago
  5. monkeygourmet

    He just needs to ‘suck it up’ and deal with it! :)

    #5 1 year ago
  6. NeoSquall

    “Dyson claimed that nine out of ten UK graduates were leaving the UK to work abroad upon finishing their studies and stated that the glamour of the games industry is shifting the focus away from engineering and science vocations.”

    Yeah, because game development requires a degree in applied wishdreaming…

    #6 1 year ago
  7. Dragon246

    People should do what they like.If they like to be in games industry, I don’t see why others should have a problem with it.

    #7 1 year ago
  8. grahamc

    @7

    But then who will design the next generation of Vacumm Cleaners?

    #8 1 year ago
  9. Hirmetrium

    Dyson will, from his new robotic body which only he can afford because it has his name on the side.

    #9 1 year ago
  10. viralshag

    @8, Probably some ex-Dyson employee who leaves to put his vacuum design idea on Kickstarter.

    #10 1 year ago
  11. Chockster

    It’s all a bit rich talking about British careers coming from someone who moved his production to Malaysia to save money.

    #11 1 year ago