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Tecmo Koei doesn’t think the Dynasty Warriors franchise gets enough credit

Friday, 11th February 2011 16:06 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Tecmo Koei is trying to grow the Dynasty Warriors brand outside of Japan, specifically in the UK, and the publisher wants consumers to see the franchise as more than just a hack ‘n’ slash series.

Speaking in an interview with MCV, the firm’s vice president of sales and marketing said the publisher plans to try and rectify this opinion with the release of Dynasty Warriors 7 next month.

“There is a tendency to think of Warriors games as just simple hack ‘n’ slash affairs but they are mainly about the characters and their role within large narrative structures,” said Will Curley. “Only by playing through every character’s storyline can you truly understand each conflict. We never label any particular side as good or bad, right or wrong – we let the players experience the war from all perspectives for themselves and make-up their own minds.

“I don’t think Warriors games get enough credit for the way they use the interactive nature of games to explore themes and narratives. But we believe this formula can be as appealing to the broad audience overseas as it is in Japan.”

Curley also said that Dynasty Warriors 7 has been given “the biggest upgrade the series has ever received,” and shows just how much the series has progressed over the years.

“We don’t think of Warriors games as a finite product but as an ongoing franchise with many entry-points and lots of contents for users to discover and enjoy once they have taken the initial plunge,” he said.

Dynasty Warriors 7 is out March 10 in Japan, March 22 in the US, and March 25 in the UK on PS3 and Xbox 360.

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30 Comments

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  1. Suikoden Fan

    simply, it doesn’t

    #1 3 years ago
  2. StolenGlory

    Well it won’t get any for innovation that’s for sure.

    #2 3 years ago
  3. Suikoden Fan

    the jump from 1 to 2 was pure innovation

    #3 3 years ago
  4. StolenGlory

    Yea, perhaps I should have amended my post (Oh wait, I can’t -_-) to “any innovation since 2001″.

    #4 3 years ago
  5. Michael O’Connor

    Large narrative structures? You took someone else’s stories, framed them in an insipid and uninspiring anime style, and threw some of the most repetitive and unappealing gameplay ever conceived in video game history on top of it all.

    That’s why it doesn’t get any credit. Because it doesn’t deserve any.

    #5 3 years ago
  6. back_up

    to get credit it needs to be PS3 exclusives

    #6 3 years ago
  7. Suikoden Fan

    @5 you need your eyes tested the game is not anime style at all only gundam 3 and fist of the north star is anime style and thats because they are being true to said animes.

    Also its kinda hard to go back in time and chnge history so theres not much they can do on that front is there? they either stay yrue to the series or piss the fuck out of all its fanbase.

    #7 3 years ago
  8. YoungZer0

    @7: Of course it’s anime style. Just look at the characters, their fucking haircuts and stupid costumes, their over-the-top weapons and shit. None of the people displayed in the game looked anything like that.

    They already piss on the history. So why not completely change it? Remember when they released that one game where Japan and China had to fight together against demons? That was actually interesting.

    If you want to tell an interesting story, don’t force grinding and boring gameplay into my throat. Don’t force disgusting bullshit voiceacting into my ears. That series deserves to die a horrible death.

    Another note: Can’t wait for the new Kingdom Under Fire.

    #8 3 years ago
  9. OlderGamer

    Going to call a spade a spade here the DW games seriously lacking.

    The Gundam ones were a nice change of scenery. And the Strikeforce one was a curve ball. Both nice, but in the end both still use the DW formula and that formula is very stale at this point.

    The game is just too simple for todays gaming world. These games worked well on the PSone, and that is where they belong.

    #9 3 years ago
  10. Michael O’Connor

    @15 You’re taking my use of the word anime too literally. I’m not talking about cartoon graphics. I’m talking about that visual Japanese style that makes almost every single Japanese game look exactly the same as each other – it’s cast is full of androgynous pretty boys and wide eyed dolls, all with plastic doll like skin and obsessively perfect feature.

    Dynasty Warriors takes the concept of derivativeness to whole new levels. If they actually bothered to realistically frame the story within a realistic narrative with realistic characters and realistic combat true to the time, it might have something going for it.

    But it doesn’t. The gameplay has no depth to it at all. It’s repetitious to the point of motonony. The franchise is pure excrement. If they want people to care, they need to stop making such shit games.

    #10 3 years ago
  11. Michael O’Connor

    That should be @7. Not sure where the 15 came from.

    #11 3 years ago
  12. Suikoden Fan

    @10 well the thing is (story here) theres not much documrntations of the Han period, except a rather biased book by luo guanzhong and a ‘remake’ of that book a few hundred years later wrote in a neutral view (this is the book the story is based on)

    the game stays true to that book so they cant differentiate at all without pissibg the fans of the game and book off, of course there are minor changes like if shu won the war etc which didnt happen btw but the keys things have to stay the same, for fans its a a cas pof its not broken so dont fix it.

    as for gameplay yeah its repetitive but i say this all the time, if you were locked in a room with one game for a whole year it doesnt matter how much you love that game your gonna get bored.

    aas for anime yeah i guess i did that that a little too literal

    #12 3 years ago
  13. Suikoden Fan

    @9 the ps1 game and there is only 1 on ps1 isa tekken like fighting game, its from the ps2 onwards it became a battlefield game

    #13 3 years ago
  14. OlderGamer

    Well my opinion stands the gameplay feels outdated.

    #14 3 years ago
  15. tont

    I’m amazed at the hate the Musou games get. I’ve always found them to be surprisingly satisfying in a mega-Gauntlet way, clearing up battlefields of fodder and dispensing officers with brutal efficiency.

    @10 – Michael, there’s plenty of depth if you’re prepared to look for it. Finding fastest routes, working out the best combo chains etc. The Orochi games also have some awesome power-levelling routes (with plenty of risk/reward)and on top of it all, it’s all even more fun in co-op.

    As for “Realistically framing the story”? Seriously? That would give the series some worth for you? I couldn’t imagine anything worse.

    Try having a go at a big stage on Chaos difficulty with a Lvl99 Ranmaru Mori. If you don’t find that satisfying and fun-filled, you don’t deserve to play games, full stop.

    #15 3 years ago
  16. Suikoden Fan

    @14 what else can they do, the only thing i’d like them to do it merge ROTK with DW so strategic warfare then outfield battles but that would be even more niche, and in a way thats whats Kessen is for

    #16 3 years ago
  17. Michael O’Connor

    @15 I should not have to reach the maximum level on the highest difficulty just to feel some vestige of skill and strategy beyond pressing the same one or two buttons over and over and over again for the whole game.

    And yes, it would. Any connections with the story are so far removed from reality that they might as well not even exist in the first place, making the whole practise pointless. The vapid anime-esque art-style only makes things worse.

    #17 3 years ago
  18. tont

    @17 Michael, Virtua Fighter 5 is pressing the same three buttons over and over again and it’s the deepest fighting game ever created. It’s a shame to see yet another appraisal of the Musou games be so reliant on throwaway cliche.

    As for reaching the highest level, that was just an extreme example of the reward that can be earnt(and not in an objectionally long time, either. Maybe I should have said Ranmaru Mori on an early level, as he’s still badass and will give you an immense sense of power but hey – if you’re seriously dissing a game so inherently based in personal improvement and raw gameplay, without hand-holding you through every incremental step, for its story and ‘vapid’ art style, I doubt defending the game’s solid mechanics will make any difference to your spectacularly misinformed opinion.

    #18 3 years ago
  19. Michael O’Connor

    @15 Boiling down Virtua Fighter to simply “pressing the same three buttons over and over again” is severely over-simplifying the game, and you know it.

    But the simply fact that you understand and appreciate the depth of Virtua Fighter’s gameplay shows that you clearly have an understanding of good gameplay mechanics. Which is why I’m even more surprised that you’re defending Dynasty Warriors of all games.

    The problem with Dynasty Warriors that literally all there is to it. You can cover a game in as much filler content (or feature creep, as its often called) as you want (Tekken and Soul Calibur being masters of this), but if you basic core gameplay has almost nothing to support it. The stuff you described in your original post is very basic and rudimentary design. There’s nothing deep about it.

    I’m always open to conversion when someone makes a valid debate for something. So please, tell me in detail, where is the depth in Dynasty Warriors? I’m willing to listen if you can make a strong argument for the game.

    For the record, I’m only talking about Dynasty Warriors here. I haven’t played any of the others, so I can’t fairly argue against them.

    #19 3 years ago
  20. xino

    they release every dynasty warrior game every year!
    how can you release a game every year? it’s just a sign of rush!

    20 enemies surround you and do nothing!
    all you do is button bash moves to form repetitive combos.

    sorry no one would talk about it unless they brush up their skills!

    I think it’s because Dynasty Warriors doesn’t have a competition, that is why nothing gets improved in the sequels.

    #20 3 years ago
  21. Suikoden Fan

    @19 well your talking just fighting mechanics and thats not the whole stoy with DW, firstly theres the law its based on, charcters added which add a new lok oe depth to battles or add entirely new battles and view points to the game, i admit its taken too long to bring jin into the series but thats an entirely new viewpoint on its own, so no only do you have a nations viewpoit but individual characters, Xiahou BA in DW7 will have and interesting story, started at WEi, joined JIN (where he is in the game) and later betrays them for Shu. You also have the viewpoints of characters and the actions they have taken viewed by other characters, the betray wont go down well.

    So that is just a really small way of describing how the story alone shapes te characters and there alignment etc.

    As for the combat system itself well that depends on the game, some use a weapon level up system some have youfind new weapons for characters (which sounds like what DW7 is doing) and the abilities of found weapons differ, sometimes they add to movesets or add attributes to attacks.

    Then you have the item system which depending on what you equip can change the strength of yourself and others or the opponents.

    you have the costume changes which is just cosmetic admittedly.

    while i cant speak for dw7, and i didnt play dw6 that much (i hated the renbu system, theres some innovation for you and most fans fucking hated it) in the case of samurai warrios 2 (my most recently played game) while on a battlefield you get objectives which some are mandatory, some arent, sometiimes you have to choose which objective to do, attack head on or flank the opponent for differing results for each strategy.

    Then you have the empires games, admittedly a seperate game, that was innovation as it let you control your own kindom and attack others and recruit other characters in a non canon way to historical events.

    And FINALLY DW7 will add online to the main series (i dont count strike force thats more of a spin off than a proper dw)

    #21 3 years ago
  22. tont

    @19 Pot and kettle, no?

    While the Musou games don’t have the same srategic depth as VF, the fact remains that dissing the Musou titles for being nothing more than pressing the same two buttons all the time (when actually, it’s been three all along – four with block – and the modern ones have extra combo-linking specials on another button) is one of the standard and unfair criticisms of the series that this news story is all about.

    As I said previously, the depth is there if you’re prepared to engage with the game’s long-term challenges. The biggest part is definitely refining your route through the stages until you’re blasting through at the fastest speed. This comes down to a combination of knowing your characters and their moves, working out which combo strings get the job done and the flow of the stages, both in terms of officer/troop placement and how events affect priorities. It takes a fair amount of play and understanding to get to that level and if you’re taking the challenge as a personal one to improve yourself and your performance, and I’d say that constitutes depth and for me, and it gives me more than enough reward to know I’ve really honed a stage as tightly as I can get it. It’s also only when characters are hitting high levels that the hardest difficulty level becomes remotely survivable, so there’s that top-level challenge that’s the drive to undertake the grind. I’d say this applies to all the DW, SW and DWG titles as it does to my favourites, the Orochi ones.

    Now I’m not saying it’s the same challenge as reaching the top ranks of VF, but it certainly takes a bit more understanding and study than a simplistic button mashing exercise to get the game humming along at its highest level.

    If you’re engaged with the race to improve efficiency by learning the stages and the characters, then you’ll soon have favourite dudes and dudettes to conduct your carnage with. To step outside your parameters of DW only, Warriors Orochi was a huge step forward in the series for the kind of Musou player that I am, as you have a team of three characters that you can switch between at any time – even mid combo if you want to show ‘sick tech’. That’s a significant increase in personal choice and opens the door for power-levelling by having one or two badasses and a low-level character in tow. You can soften up enemies for easy XP with the newbie, or arm your low-level people with badass weapons and further streamline the levelling curves.

    I stand by my claim that lvl99 characters in hardcore Chaos difficulty stages are an utter joy – the feeling of dominance and command over the game that you get is the endgame reward. It’s equally awesome when inexperienced friends come over for co-op and you can hand them a suite of characters to pick from that will have them squealing with delight as they make short work of literally thousands of soldiers. A good, fun power-class character will chop through a five-man enemy commander brawl with the kind of GRAHHH I’M SO FUCKING BADASS dominance that Bayonetta, Ninja Gaiden etc all can only hope to let the player have.

    As for the story, setting, art style and, best of all, the terrible voice acting, well they’re kitschy comedy for us. We love the mad naffness of it all, and adore the series for its faults as much as its strengths.

    #22 3 years ago
  23. DaMan

    @Older sorry, what? DW on the PSOne? there was one crappy fighting, which had nothing to do with the strategy/beat ‘em ups released since 2000.

    the original PS2 game fully deserves the credit for being a pioneer of their genre, as much as Dmc or NG warrant to be called the fathers of hack and slash. unfortunately they stagnated after DW3.

    and those games aren’t kitschy. that’s bullshit. they might be insipid and over the top at times, anything but not kitschy. they have zero artistic merit, like Voltron or Transfromers.

    #23 3 years ago
  24. Rosseu

    Tell it to X-play lol

    #24 3 years ago
  25. OlderGamer

    Good lord Deman, DMC and NG are alot of things but father of hack and slash they are not.

    And DW is fair from the pioneer.

    I used to import Capcom games on my Saturn from JP. They had a slew of games that played exactly like DW(only on a 2D plan). Even had a few of em that had chinnesse dynasty themes. Be damned if I can remember the names.

    And Guardian Hereos was the pinicale of hack and slash(again on the Saturn).

    Also the long line Neo Geo and Turbo Duo games?

    How about Diablo? Pretty good hack and slash right there.

    I think you are greatly over stating a couple of games.

    I am not undervaluing the DW games. Really. The problem is that the games have so much room for growth. And yet each year it seems they rehash the same tried and tired formula.

    On a personal note I really enjoyed BladeStorm. It hadded a few layers of depth both on the field of play and also off the battlefield in managment aspects of the game.

    But the core DW games, flat, boring, and lackluster.

    You want to see a well done hack and slash JP game – go play a Phantasy Star Online/Universe game. Those games are head and shoulders abouve most of the other stuff out there in terms of gameplay and char development. Apples and oranges, kinda. But if some liberties were taken with DW the tweaks would be welcome by most gamers I bet.

    As it stands right now, you play one DW game, you have played em all.

    #25 3 years ago
  26. DaMan

    ……….
    …..
    ..

    look, Older… are you just having fun, or are you serious? thanks for enlightening, might as well say Contra was the father of fps (*a joke*). you don’t have to type a page long post for me about that, I’ve played Gauntlet in the late 80s.

    obviously I meant the PS2 era stylish games.

    all the ones like Guardian Heroes you described were one button mashers or beat em ups, Diablo was a dungeon crawler or action/rpg whatever you like to call it.

    also, DW was a mix of Streets of Rage/GH / whatever ‘s your favourite bet em up and strategy. which is what I was bloody referring to. the Empires games wer even more of s strategy ones.

    ‘As it stands right now, you play one DW game, you have played em all.’
    …..

    ..which was what I said. exactly..

    Older, I have a question: when you say ‘These games worked well on the PSone’ I presume I have to translate that into ‘titles like DW’, but when I make the notion of how NG and Dmc were the pioneers of PS2 era slashers that required skills, it’s being misinterpreted as them being the fathers of button pressing. is that some kind of a game you like to play via texting?

    #26 3 years ago
  27. DaMan

    oh, and on PC Diablo was even controlled with a mouse, you clicked on enemies. when in Dmc it ‘s more of a fighting even.

    no game ever existed in a vacuum. by taking mechanics in isolation and placing them out of context you can trace the roots of any modern game to Pong.

    #27 3 years ago
  28. DBZ0wnz

    I only played one game from the series and that’s Gundam 2, which really sucks badly.

    #28 3 years ago
  29. Crysis

    Maybe they should Westernize it with maybe a Western invasion theme, more possibilities with more races.

    #29 3 years ago
  30. Amored

    Dynasty Warriors is one of my favorite game franchises ever.
    To me DW beats most games nowadays. Yes, the gameplay might be a little outdated, but it’s fun. I like developers who make fun games :)

    #30 3 years ago