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Shigeru Miyamoto’s BAFTA acceptance speech

Friday, 19th March 2010 22:29 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

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Shigeru Miyamoto took the stage at the BAFTA awards tonight to accept the Fellowship Award.

In his acceptance speech, he said that he was not only honored, and appreciative of the award, but proud of the games industry itself.

Here is our rough transcription of his speech:

“It is a great honor to receive this award and I would liek to thank BAFTA for this great honor.

When I get an ward like this two things come to mind that, One, that I am getting older. I made first game when I was 27 years old, and looking in the faces of people in front of me tonight, reminds me that I am getting very old. But secondly, I am humbled because I can’t do this by myself.

I am embarrassed to receive such an award, so I am taking it for everyone who has worked with me in the last few years and I thank them for all their hard work.

I have been in the industry now, for over 20 years. I am grateful Nintendo took me in off the street. The industry has changed dramatically since I started my career at Nintendo. Back then there was no such thing as videogames at the company, but I wanted to make something that could surprise and entertain people. I was lucky to get a job that involved making videogames from the dawn of the industry.

The first game I was involved in developing was Donkey Kong. It was one of the first games created by artists and game designers and due to its popularity, designers got a larger role in creating videogames.

The most important thing today, though, is to make them fun.

I am often asked what inspired me as a child. I loved playing outside and looking at the natural world around me and even today it inspires my imagination. For example, playing with my dogs gave me inspiration for Nintendogs. My staff and I are always trying to develop something that is unique.

To create a new standard, you have to be up for new challenges. That’s why I have become even more conscious in how people play with videogames rather than the content I develop for them.

When I was working on Super Mario Bros. Wii, I imagined how people would play and how people could enjoy it together, which had been my dream sine the first Mario game was made 25 years ago.

So instead of focusing on content, I am more interested in atmosphere where player can interact with each other. Our imagination and creativity takes us to countless fascinating places were we hope to make new experiences for people of all ages

This I call a recipe for joy.

Thank you for this great honor, and than you to my colleges at Nintendo and developers all over the world for making this journey possible

I hope the videogame industry continues to develop with both entertainment and character”.

The list of BAFTA winners from tonight can be found through here.

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12 Comments

  1. Razor

    Great stuff.

    #1 5 years ago
  2. Erthazus

    He deserve this award. I’m not in to Mario stuff but he did a LOT to the industry. Thats a fact.

    #2 5 years ago
  3. cookiejar

    A true gent, there. Well deserved.

    #3 5 years ago
  4. daytripper

    legend, fully deserved

    #4 5 years ago
  5. Samuel

    How sweet of him to say than you to all of his colleges.

    #5 5 years ago
  6. itsucks

    old fart is old.

    myiamoto u r winrar.

    #6 5 years ago
  7. absolutezero

    When I get an ward

    #7 5 years ago
  8. Bringit

    I was there. He nearly had me in tears. What an absolute legend. He changed the lives of millions and yet still acts like he isn’t anything special.

    He is. He said he can’t make games on his own. And he’s right. But that just goes to show what an incredible, humble man he is.

    No matter what you think of Nintendo today, Shigeru Miyamoto is, without question, the man in games. He doesn’t care about your thoughts on Heavy Rain, Project Natal or any of the other gubbins in the industry today. He just does his own thing. And he does it better than anyone.

    #8 5 years ago
  9. TheWulf

    Mostly @8

    I’ve got nothing against Miyamoto, I really dig the guy, but it is mildly unsettling to see that the world has forgotten what the home computers and bedroom coders did to advance gaming. Hell, they invented innovation in gaming, and they didn’t need a corporation to do it.

    That or I’m just a bit older than the average gamer and I remember these things, whereas people younger than me didn’t live through those fun times and thus have ‘memories’ built upon Nintendo claiming they are the most innovative and always were the most innovative.

    Nothing against Miyamoto, but it’s pretty sad to see him get recognition but those little guys. But that’s how things work, it’s about how important and how much of a celebrity someone is more than anything else.

    And again, what 18 pointed out… UK bedroom coders were doing that in my youth, with no funding or backing, some were even putting out tapes and disks themselves, without any help whatsoever.

    #9 5 years ago
  10. Michael O’Connor

    “That or I’m just a bit older than the average gamer and I remember these things, whereas people younger than me didn’t live through those fun times and thus have ‘memories’ built upon Nintendo claiming they are the most innovative and always were the most innovative.”

    I was as much around in those times as you were – when Dizzy was an icon on the same level as Mario, when Codemasters were *the* company to watch, when U.S Gold took up 90% of the stores shelves for video games long before specialist stores existed…

    …but Miyamoto’s influenced can’t be ignored, and none of it has to do with being part of s corporation. He has created characters who have endured for over 2 decades, created and perfected game mechanics that have become staples of gaming design, and has reinvented gaming time and time again.

    Nobody in this industry has had as much impact as this one single man, and nobody deserves it more than him.

    #10 5 years ago
  11. Michael O’Connor

    Can someone please edit this troll’s posts? I’ll never understand why people intentionally go out of their way to ruin other people’s experiences.

    #11 5 years ago
  12. YoungZer0

    Gee, so long in the industry, you might think that by now, he should be able to talk english.

    #12 5 years ago

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