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YouTube Content ID: Angry Joe posts video update, confirms that claims are being resolved

Monday, 20th January 2014 08:49 GMT By Dave Cook

YouTuber Angry Joe has posted a video update on the 63 Content ID strikes slapped on his videos. It follows on the implementation of YouTube’s new copyright measures, which saw a run of third-party firms flagging videos they often had nothing to do with.

We have Joe’s original response video and an in-depth article full of updates on the YouTube Content ID issue. Hit the link to see how it unfolded.

In the new clip above, Joe explains that he managed to get the Content ID claims written off by simply disputing them. If the complaining third-party didn’t follow up after that point, the claim would be automatically released. Using this method, he has now successfully whittled his claim list down from around 63 to 66 claims, and now has around 23 remaining.

He added that some companies happily removed Content ID claims after Joe got in touch with them, and explained that most of the companies had nothing to do with the content of his videos to begin with. Others were not so understanding, and Joe has now vowed to boycott the firms as a result.

Among the companies releasing claims, Joe name-dropped EA, Capcom, Namco Bandai and others from around the industry.

Hit the video and let us know what you think about this issue below.

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13 Comments

  1. unacomn

    Only 63? Pff, lightweight. I’ve got over 100 on which I long ago gave up hope of ever turning a profit on. Which is regrettable, since the only possible profitable ones were among them.

    Some get periodically re-scanned and re-content claimed.
    Like a video preview I once did for Cataclysm, using b-roll footage they made available to the press. It wasn’t under NDA or anything.
    I got a direct copyright strike for that. After that got resolved, and the content claim got resolved, the matched content flag came and went, until I just gave up.

    Now I just don’t bother with some companies. I’ve take to substituting every image of Nintendo games in any further news shows with MS Paint drawings of Nintendo characters.

    Miming gameplay sometimes works, or just standing in front of a camera, covering the majority of the game footage being projected onto a green screen behind me.

    It’s too bad what’s happening to Joe, but I really am glad this change happened. Now everyone knows the crap someone who isn’t affiliated with a network had to dredge through for years. Maybe it’ll change something in the long run. Like not equating an accusation with guilt, making a penalty for false claims, or just about anything that actually protects content creators from the broken mess of a system.

    On the bright side, at least I use Youtube mainly for storage of the videos I produce, I don’t have the pretence to exceed the traffic the videos get through the site itself, of which Youtube indexes about one tenth, because they are embedded.

    Also note, before this debacle, Capcom would just outright reject content ID appeals. But hey, surf that positive PR wave while you can, you sure need it. A good Resident Evil game wouldn’t hurt either.

    #1 10 months ago
  2. Tormenter

    why doesn’t someone just start a new vid upload site?

    Don’t bitch if you’re not willing to do something about it.

    #2 10 months ago
  3. Ireland Michael

    @2 Because you can’t just build up millions of subscribers overnight on a completely new website, using a medium that requires billions or dollars to maintain and monetise.

    He’s not “bitching” about anything. This is the equivalent of hiring people to present on your TV station and then refusing to pay their wages, but still expecting to them work.

    #3 10 months ago
  4. GrimRita

    EA are a bunch of arseholes but even they see the benefits of these kind of review sites. How many times, have you seen a video and heard some music and maybe purchased it? I have!

    Either way it’s all bollocks as these are the kind of companies who just do not get digital and the benefits of such will all find it will end in tears.

    Poor Joe looks knackered

    #4 10 months ago
  5. Ireland Michael

    @4 Unfortunately, Square Enix apparently do not. Which is disappointing but sadly not surprising.

    #5 10 months ago
  6. Tormenter

    @3

    Who said anything about overnight, if someone expects that then they are a fucking idiot.

    Don’t people understand the concept of delayed gratification anymore?

    #6 10 months ago
  7. Ireland Michael

    @6 Don’t people understand the concept of not being an insensitive asshole anymore?

    Many of these people rely on this work to pay their rent and keep the lights on. Its hard, tiring, and often thankless work. These specific people are PARTNERED or affiliated with YouTube. They should not be subject to this kind of scrutiny, when they are the people keeping the service alive and are breaking no laws.

    Leaving YouTube would completely decimate their income, making it impossible for a lot of them to even keep making their show because they wouldn’t be earning enough money to consistently produce them. Video streaming is prohibitively expensive. Its easy to tell someone to start from scratch when you’re not the one relying on the income.

    #7 10 months ago
  8. Tormenter

    @7

    Here’s more insensitive assholery then… THEY SHOULD FIND A FUCKING JOB THAT THEY DON’T FEEL PISSES ON THEM, AND JUST SHUT THE FUCK UP ABOUT IT… You know, like every other cunt in the world.

    Boo, fucking, hoo.. a bunch of twats can’t get paid for playing games, not exactly a disaster.

    #8 10 months ago
  9. Ireland Michael

    @8 Joe doesn’t get paid for playing games. He gets paid for reviewing them. By the very company that gave him affiliation status to pay him for doing so.

    If everyone quit their job solely because they were treated like shot at it, 99% of working people would be unemployed. You have a very naive view of the world, and a very callous and unsympathetic attitude towards the difficulties people deal with in life.

    Or are you going to claim what they’re doing isn’t a “real job”?

    #9 10 months ago
  10. Tormenter

    @9

    Are you still here?

    #10 10 months ago
  11. Ireland Michael

    @11 Consideting you’re the one walking into threads and insulting people who are just trying to make a fair living, your ego is ironically misplaced. I would suggest looking at yourself before being snarky towards others.

    You seem to have a problem with people responding to your aggressive opinions, and lashing out when they don’t agree. Might want to work on that.

    #11 10 months ago
  12. jon_

    I’m still waiting for around 50 claims to be removed on my work Youtube channel. Funny enough, the worst type of claim are the ones coming from Sony Music Entertainment and something called “WMA”.

    We used like 10 or 15 seconds of a song for an event coverage (EA Showcase 2013) and we got a copyright claim. I dsiputed it argumenting fair use due being used for news reporting and the song was obtained legally, also its just a few second of it. Guess what happened?

    SME rejected my arguments, reestablished the copyright claim and automatically they hit the channel with a copyright strike resulting in our video being deleted. An event coverage was deleted for 10 seconds of music.

    What happens when your account has a copyright strike and copyright claims? You cannot upload longer videos, dispute copyright claims, stream live videos, use annotations and more.

    Funny enough, we have copyright claims on some of our E3 videos and on our PS4 launch coverage too, because for the music being used, the publisher such as EA, Konami, etc, or some other unknown company.

    As you can see, this problem doesn’t affect only Youtubers or Vloggers, so your arguments about “getting a real job” are kind of invalid.

    #12 10 months ago
  13. LTheBlackKnight

    Never thought I’d see Angry Joe make the headlines on here. Awesome.

    #13 10 months ago

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