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Steam Machine from iBuyPower to go for $499

Wednesday, 27th November 2013 01:21 GMT By Brenna Hillier

A few more details have emerged regarding iBuyPower’s Steam Machine, which we saw prototype images of yesterday, including price and some slim technical details.

The Verge reports the box will go on sale for $499 next year, and the price includes a Steam Controller.

It boasts a multicore AMD CPU, and a $180 AMD Radeon R9 270 GPU. It has Wi-Fi, Bluetooth and a 500GB hard drive.

The console-like PC is said to be bigger than a PS4 and smaller than an Xbox One. There’s no power brick; the PSU is built in.

The light bar down the middle is cutomisable.

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42 Comments

  1. Erthazus

    “R9 270 GPU”
    Has much more power then Xbox One GPU or PS4.

    Example:
    R9 270: 2.69 TFLOPS
    Xbox One: 1.31 TFLOPS
    PS4: 1.84 TFLOPS

    and it’s just a launch of a console and not a version after 1-2 years.

    #1 1 year ago
  2. FeaturePreacher

    I smell fail all over this. A fixed component pc, released in 2014, giving the ps4 a year to drop down to $350, at least, PC users, who don’t want consoles don’t want this, console users who have consoles don’t want this, no trading in physical discs, running on an open os which will scare off major publishers, with a hard drive that will fill up quickly, this seems like an even larger boondoggle than the ouya.

    #2 1 year ago
  3. Obernox

    I’m a console owner and i’m absolutely interested in this, especially after seeing the price.
    500GB for a digital only console is a problem though.

    #3 1 year ago
  4. Phoenixblight

    @2

    Forgetting that there won’t be an exclusive titles either. Valve had said they will not be making exclusive steambox titles. Its a niche device and will continue to be so until a huge demographic jumps to the OS, more than Apple(doubt it), not to mention the performance gain of going to linux over windows is an exaggeration by Valve(surprise!).

    http://www.extremetech.com/gaming/167541-making-sense-of-the-steam-box-windows-vs-linux-opengl-vs-direct3d-and-the-impact-of-support-from-amd-nvidia

    #4 1 year ago
  5. debug

    @FeaturePreacher
    I agree. When something looks too good to be true, then it’s too good to be true. However, ‘an open os which will scare off major publishers’ ?
    No, what are you talking about, it’s not gonna scare anyone if Steam will be still there.

    It’s more like, ANOTHER OS that studios will have to dev for? Yeah, that might slow things down.

    #5 1 year ago
  6. Phoenixblight

    @5

    Or they will not bother with it. Which is likely the case. All the major publishers don’t actually port the games to Mac they give it to a studio that specializes in porting. SteamOS would have to make a huge splash for triple A developers to even bother. Indies will go for whatever they are capable of going because they have to in order to survive. I just don’t see anyone dropping 500$ just for Steam OS and its ‘hundreds’ of titles.

    #6 1 year ago
  7. Gekidami

    @4
    So it looks like the Steambox’s name is quite suiting, because when you sit down and actually look at it, its full of nothing but hot air.

    Yeah, i see nothing but failure for this, it isnt for gamers, its for jaded PC fanboys who hate consoles more than they like actually playing games. And with the XB1 & PS4 setting sales records, i doubt theres any demand for these.

    #7 1 year ago
  8. Dendroball

    For the moment, problem with the Steambox is unless you’re installing a Windows OS on it to play the vast majority of Steam catalog consisting of non Linux ported games, you’ll only have a box playing a few Linux ported games with a gaming streaming feature which will require another powerful PC running those Windows based games in the background. So well nothing that we couldn’t already do ie. building/buying a mini PC for couch/TV setup or directly linking your PC to your TV.

    Maybe later it will change but this is what it is for the moment, only novelty being the Steam controler that you will certainly be able to purchase without a Steambox.

    #8 1 year ago
  9. xxJPRACERxx

    I’m not interested in this but I can’t wait for the Steam Controller.

    #9 1 year ago
  10. naffgeek

    I am VERY interested in this.

    I can only think people are writing it off because they have ordered/bought PS4 or xbox1 and the whole tearing down of whatever they don’t own has started.

    There are a lot of people who are holding back from purchasing the rushed, poorly featured and ethically dubious next gen machines.

    I think Valve are timing this perfectly and I for one will be glad that there is a fourth choice….£60 rrp for a game that contains micro-transactions is just too much for me and the ‘Next gen’ seems to be the people who feel its fine to buy Fifa for £55 then spend another £100 on bloody panini stickers!!!

    The steam controller if done right (and no reason to think otherwise yet) will open up the living room to such a diverse selection of games and not just COD/FIFA/BF clones.

    Bring it on..

    #10 1 year ago
  11. manamana

    @10 +1 although I’m probably buying a PS4 for the exclusives . I know me too well …

    #11 1 year ago
  12. Virginityrocks

    @2 Why would an open OS scare off publishers? Being open just means they don’t have to pay a company (Nintendo, Sony, Microsoft, etc.) to make third-party apps for their system, or get permission or wait for approval by an arbitrary governing body, like the app store. Being open attracts publishers and developers to create new and interesting content, and creates a profitable ecosystem for indie developers and independent app creators.

    #12 1 year ago
  13. naffgeek

    @11 Yeah as soon as I play a PS4 demo pod my Credit Card will start pulling me towards the checkout :).

    Definitely want a steambox to though. Especially if they have optimised the graphics drivers like they say. It will be like a console (closed architecture) but 3 x powerful.

    #13 1 year ago
  14. viralshag

    I still don’t see the appeal. Why would you buy this when there’s the PS4 for people who like consoles and why would a PC gamer buy this when their machine is probably better?

    I think there may be some demand for this but I imagine it will just get folded into the mix with regular PCs and not stand out that much as an individual product.

    #14 1 year ago
  15. manamana

    @viral I too think that it’s not mainstream enough. That doesn’t mean that it can go alongside my consoles. And my (bootcamped) Macs. So yes, I don’t have a ‘gaming-PC’ – and I’m not interested in building one. But I’m very open to whatever Valve is scouting out. And I’m very interested in the upcoming VR-tech which seems to be more demanding than what the new consoles are willing to output.

    So yes, it might be niche. But I’m okay with that, if the package is right.

    #15 1 year ago
  16. TheBlackHole

    I don’t see why anyone would buy a third party bit of hardware. Valve will no doubt support their own machines better than any other company – Just look at how long you have to wait for Samsung or Sony to update Android when a new version comes out.

    Much better to go vanilla.

    #16 1 year ago
  17. freedoms_stain

    @16, these will run SteamOS, which will be updated in the same way as any other OS, all at once.

    #17 1 year ago
  18. CyberMarco

    I’m not sure about this either. I think that in order the SteamBox to succeed, Valve needs SteamOS to succeed first.

    I think it’s the OS then the box situation here. I already have a PC so I’m not really interested in the SteamBox, but I’m eager to see how the SteamOS will turn out to be.

    It’s going to be hard being a Linux-based OS as ~10% of Steam games supports Linux, and just a fraction of it are AAA games.

    So yeah, I think the SteamOS is the game-changer here, either it will make them or brake them.

    @10 I don’t have and wont be buying for the next 2-3 years a next-gen console, so I think you’re wrong on that case.

    #18 1 year ago
  19. Dendroball

    @18 I guess you’re in for a surprise because at the very beginning SteamOS will be like the current big picture mode from Steam, so no desktop and obviously limited features compared to a real Linux OS. Now it doesn’t mean it won’t just be that, another Linux OS but that thing won’t happen overnight just like porting to Linux a large part of the Steam catalog.

    #19 1 year ago
  20. viralshag

    The other thing I’m curious about is what separates this from a normal PC? Like, what’s the USP for a store to shift these? What’s going to grab buyers attention for this over any other PC on the market?

    The fact it’s not actually a Valve machine makes it no more special than an unbranded Ebuyer machine running Win8… plus the whole multiple manufacturers idea, I just wonder if any one company will be able to shift enough to make it worth it.

    #20 1 year ago
  21. Dendroball

    @20 For the moment, the device is just not that appealing for the console masses, I’m not talking about us people visiting Video Games websites daily but the majority of people that already own a PS3/360 and will certainly buy a next gen console in the months to come.

    I think Steam knows that and wants to sell first a SteamBox to a part of the Steam crowd who maybe wanted a couch mini PC to play some Steam games on their big TV (and were certainly too lazy to build a mini PC or just didn’t know the existence of this type of machines at all). And it makes sense in a way because of the Linux OS really limiting the number of games you can play on Linux natively, so this is where the streaming feature comes in and allows those people to use that powerful PC they already have. So yeah I would say it’s pretty niche for the moment.

    #21 1 year ago
  22. TheWulf

    This is mostly at #20, I guess, as I feel I’ve done the best I can to describe my position in this post.

    So why would a SteamBox be desirable to both sides?

    The first and most important point is the loss of Windows as our only potential open platform. With Windows, you have ridiculously bloated software and processes which are slowing the computer down all the time. Most people don’t know how to deal with this.

    In regards to performance comparisons, this is why Linux will always out-perform Windows, even with games, because there’s just less crap to weigh the computer down. If you strip a Windows computer of all of its bloated software and processes, it might almost run as well as Linux. Still, the way Linux is built, it’s easier to strip out the crap.

    From a performance standpoint, Linux is better for gamers.

    Further, from a performance standpoint, the SteamBox variants give developers a set point to optimise for. So if you follow the hardware used in various boxes, you’ll be guaranteed a good experience. It’ll also encourage publishers to optimise better, knowing that they can’t get away with saying that it’s the fault of Windows.

    For console owners? Ease of use, reliability, and the aesthetics of a console. Those are important. Even a console crashes, but Linux is capable of a better always-on uptime than even the best of consoles.

    Honestly, I’ve been saying for years (on this site and others) that an open platform merged PC-console thing would pretty much decimate the existing proprietary console market. There are just so many things on a PC that a console owner would have access to that they don’t currently, and I’ll do my best to cover all the bases.

    The console owner, right now, has a fatty diet of mainstream games. Just modern military shooters, action adventures, and so on. Eventually, everyone wants variety. What if you could play the Blackwell series on a giant TV? That has to be appealing.

    There are loads of good games on the PC which only exist there because the genres don’t exist on consoles. Talking about exclusivity is silly, really, because we have all of the exclusivity we need. Not because of marketing contracts, but simply because they’re by smaller developers who don’t want to develop for the consoles. Then you have games like Dungeonland which aren’t released on the consoles because the networked gaming infrastructure for them isn’t as strong as it is for the PC.

    Neither the PS3, PS4, XBox 360, or XBox One can shake a stick at the servers and infrastructure Valve has.

    With a SteamBox, you can play DOTA 2 from your couch. And more, it removes the segregation of consoles and PC owners, since we’d all be using that same infrastructure. We’d be able to play more games together, with no gatekeepers or limitations.

    So we’ve already established that it has an aesthetic that’s appealing to console owners, and which will allow them access to new types of and genres of games. So what else is on offer?

    Well, you have more experimental experiences that just wouldn’t be seen amongst the mainstream smorgasbord on a console. Consoles only advertise the mainstream, so anything experimental or strange would get lost. Whereas on Steam it’s advertised at the forefront. You have things which are more experiences than games — like Proteus, Shelter, and Gone Home.

    This would bridge the gap between console owners and PC owners, so we could all play and talk about the same kinds of games. That’s glorious. And it would probably do a lot to end the ridiculous platform elitism and hatreds that go around.

    What else?

    Well, I’ve covered the low-maintenance angle, but let me talk more on that. what a console owner wants is to be able to sit down, flick a switch on their little plastic box, pick a game, and play it. A SteamBox can offer that via Big Picture Mode. But what if Big Picture Mode can extend its functionality beyond games?

    Think on this…

    I’m a PS4/XBox One owner. I’ve just installed Fallout 4, hooray! But I loathe PC users because they have texture packs to make the game look better, and mods to improve how the game plays. I’m not smart enough to figure out a PC, so I’ll just hate them instead. Hate, hate, hate. Oh, how I hate them.

    I’m a PC owner! I’ve just installed Fallout 4 and all of these rad mods. Man, I have such a vast variety of mods to adjust my game to my tastes. Look! I’m on a motorbike now! I’m driving around the wastes! Vrrrom!

    I’m a SteamBox owner! I’ve just installed Fallout 4, and I have access to all the mods that PC guy does! I can just install them at the touch of a button in the Steam workshop. See? I pushed the ‘Install’ button on this motorbike mod, and now I have it too! Yay! Let’s drive around the wastes together.

    See what I’m getting at, here? For the majority who aren’t suffering with marketing brainwashing or cognitive dissonance, this represents the best of all possible worlds. You get the comfort of a console with the bonuses of a PC. You’ll still have PC users who’ll prefer to sit at a desk or use a laptop, but they won’t be something to feel inferior to any more. Everyone will have access to all the same stuff.

    And I’ve been saying just this for so many years. The PC is, as I’ve admitted, too high maintenance for some people. For a PC, you need to be smart and resourceful, and not lazy. That’s an experience which doesn’t suit everyone. Yet the alternative is a proprietary, gated experience which is so much more limited by comparison, you lose out on so much just by owning a console. You’re so limited in what you play and how you play.

    So here comes the SteamBox, to provide a middle-ground to make everyone happy. You can have the ‘just work’ elements of a console (thanks to the Big Picture Mode), and the mods along with the other genres/experiences which are usually only available to PC owners.

    This needs to be the future, and I embrace it wholeheartedly.

    Proprietary stuff, closed stuff… it needs to die. For all the reasons I’ve discussed above. Imagine a future where what we’re allowed to buy is dictated to us by corporations, where small developers will never be able to sell anything without a giant publisher’s help, where we can’t modify and alter our games to suit our tastes. That’s what proprietary consoles are right now, and it’s the worst possible case scenario. That needs to go away. And I think people are slowly beginning to realise that.

    This is what we need the future to be — open platform consoles.

    What’s the appeal of the SteamBox? Everything that consoles and PCs aren’t.

    #22 1 year ago
  23. manamana

    ^ excuse me mate but what is wrong with you, posting an entire book?

    #23 1 year ago
  24. TheWulf

    @21

    People bought a Wii U. I think that if you tell them that this new ‘console’ will get them better graphics (since they like graphics) and then add that they can have mods in their games, a lot of wallets will be flashed.

    I think it’s underestimated how popular mods are. On the Nexus and official Bethesda forums, I see people asking about console mods every day.

    #24 1 year ago
  25. TheWulf

    @23

    Hardly a book, you’re just incredibly lazy, which isn’t my problem.

    I just take the time to express myself properly. It’s not my fault I’m intelligent enough to do so. I hate being vilified by lazy people for being smart, that’s annoying.

    And I’m no genius, either. I guess it’s just… I’m not lazy.

    #25 1 year ago
  26. TheWulf

    Hm. There’s even another angle I didn’t consider.

    If someone buys a PS4, they won’t be able to play PS2 games.

    If someone buys a SteamBox, they’ll be able to play PS2 games, PSone games, GameCube games, Wii games, Dreamcast games, those of every prior console, and a rich back-catalogue of PC games.

    The back catalogue is handled easily by WINE and DosBox — both of which can be made incredibly simple to use, as there are frontends out there which make installing games for them as simple as a button click.

    That’s one hell of a launch library.

    Yeah, I can see the appeal of a SteamBox. At least, if you actually bother to think about it. I guess few people actually do stop to think, though.

    #26 1 year ago
  27. Dragon

    “It’s not my fault I’m intelligent enough to do so. I hate being vilified by lazy people for being smart, that’s annoying.”

    Keep up with that attitude.

    #27 1 year ago
  28. Phoenixblight

    @23

    Just don’t bother. He just likes to stroke his ego for everyone to see. Any person that has researched the things he posts about can clearly see the holes in his “facts”.

    #28 1 year ago
  29. Joe Musashi

    Verbosity is not in indicator of intelligence.

    I should know. ;)

    JM

    #29 1 year ago
  30. Fin

    @25

    You not got a job or something else to keep you occupied bro?

    #30 1 year ago
  31. manamana

    @28 at least he could put a summary. Maybe he’s too lazy :P

    #31 1 year ago
  32. Dendroball

    @TheWulf The argument of using Wine to be able to play Windows based games on SteamOS doesn’t really suit, or should I say contradict, your other main argument of dismissing Windows because of so called bloated softwares which get in your way. Using Wine is certainly not the ideal solution and will just add an unnecessary layer of software which will hurt your games performances in the end. It will even be arguably worse than playing on Windows natively especially if support on that software is not officially offered by the publishers, the community can help sure but good luck with optimizing this piece of software with a catalog of thousands of titles.

    #32 1 year ago
  33. CyberMarco

    @ The Wulf, man what a wall! :P

    Anyhow, I almost agree with you but as I said in my previous post, SteamOS needs to be successful first and then we can bother talking about the SteamBox.

    The SteamBox is nothing particular per-se, it’s just a more mainstream, gaming-oriented consolized PC.

    The SteamOS on the other hand is where the money is. You wont be able to use all of the PC’s advantages (better performance, modding tools, hacking/tweaking, better online features etc.) if you don’t have a rock-solid, dev-friendly and versatile OS to accompany it.

    Steam must with the Windows battle first before tempting to challenge the consoles, IMO always.

    #33 1 year ago
  34. Hcw87

    So, someone just waltzed in here and took the crown off Erthazus for being the biggest PC snob on planet earth.

    Congratulations.

    #34 1 year ago
  35. Erthazus

    Stop crying you sony and ms fanboys. This is not for you.

    this is for people who want the biggest library of games with the future in mind. you can play in 720p and 30 fps on medium settings in the next 10 years with PS4 and Xbox One. No one stops you from getting all the fun from this madness.

    #35 1 year ago
  36. CyberMarco

    No one can beat Erth in arrogance and douchebag-ness though! -.-

    #36 1 year ago
  37. viralshag

    No one stops me because I have a PC. No need to buy a second one to do the exact same thing that I can do now.

    #37 1 year ago
  38. Erthazus

    @38,
    Arrogance and douchebag-ness? So the fact that consoles are underpowered and that gamers will get 720p and 30 fps at best means that I’m arrogant and douchebag?

    Are you insane?

    @38, no one stops you. this is not for you then. This is for people who don’t have a PC for gaming and want Steam on their console with steam controller and decent next gen gaming.

    #38 1 year ago
  39. Legendaryboss

    I see a big wall from one, no more needs to be said.

    @36
    LOL i wonder if you type this with a serious face.

    #39 1 year ago
  40. Erthazus

    @40, well, I know for sure that you type every your post with a serious face thinking that you are so smart. anyway, enjoy 720p. Soon.

    #40 1 year ago
  41. Legendaryboss

    @41
    So the mystery continues, thanks for the enjoy part.

    #41 1 year ago
  42. CyberMarco

    Erth you are such a jerk.

    I’m not arguing that PCs deliver better visuals compared/performance/versatility/features compared to a closed gaming console, but you clearly fail to express yourself in an educated and polite manner.

    “lol, console peasants with suP Bar 720p woodly-doodly crappy graphics and blah blah blah”

    And again, SteamBox by itself isn’t something revolutionary, at least not just yet. Sure, it’s really promising and something I would really dig into, but if SteamOS doesn’t manage to support most, if not all current and new (AAA to indie) games natively it’ll just be an overpriced streaming box.

    Also you prompt to bass and make fun out of the next-gen features “lol, 1080p in 2013, welcome to 2008. Twitch streaming and video capture and shit like that” without knowing how things will turn out, yet you are preaching anything that has to do with PC gaming as it’s the Lord’s second coming or something.

    Get serious…

    #42 1 year ago

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