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NFS: Most Wanted ‘had to be open world, people didn’t get Burnout Paradise’, says dev

Wednesday, 5th September 2012 09:23 GMT By Dave Cook

Need for Speed: Most Wanted follows the same open world format as the original game, and this was the only option, Criteron’s vice president Alex Ward has explained, despite his fears that people didn’t ‘get’ Burnout Paradise’s open world setting.

In an AusGamers interview, Ward explained the need for an open world setting, “You might think that following [Burnout] Paradise – which is a pretty revolutionary game nobody understood, there’s no way that we could do an open-world game – that is what Most Wanted always had to be for us – without building on what we did before. There’s no way we couldn’t put easy drive in, there’s no way we couldn’t put social challenges in the multiplayer, and shake it up.”

2So to us it’s just about taking it further,” Ward added, “we always said each game is a reflection of who we are at the time, and this game, Most Wanted, reflects who we are, probably more than anything else: which is social, connected, and everything a game needs to be in 2012. Like I said, we just need to change it up really; that’s what we’ve got to do.”

“I believe that in 2012,” Ward continued, “a game’s got to be very connected, they’ve got to have friends at the heart of the game. I’ve got to be able to do whatever I want, whenever I want to do it.”

“So obviously,” Ward concluded, “Paradise was a great stepping-stone from there. We like a bit of revolution; we like to turn things on its head. We did it with Burnout, and now we’re doing it with Need for Speed.”

What do you think? Do you like open world racers, or should the team go back to the arcade vibe of the Burnout games? Let us know below.

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12 Comments

  1. Hunam

    Paradise is the only racing game with cars I actually like.

    #1 2 years ago
  2. SplatteredHouse

    “which is a pretty revolutionary game nobody understood”
    Revolutionary I’ll grant, I’d sing of that side all day long. But, I don’t know where the idea came from that nobody understood that game. That’s arrogant! A good many number of people understood very well, and delighted in playing BP.

    They should very much return to the arcade gameplay of Burnout. You know, ever since they revealed Most um, Wanted? It’s been nothing but a procession of disappointment, and let downs. They didn’t revere the work of Black Box, they sought to over-write it with their own mess of gameplay, and trade on an unsoiled name! >:(

    #2 2 years ago
  3. soqquatto

    I don’t mean to be rude but you seriously need an editor. The first paragraph is all over the place, what is Ward saying? I can’t read that.

    #3 2 years ago
  4. Gadzooks!

    I personally couldn’t give a toss about NFS, they can do what they like to it and it won’t be on my radar.

    I am still pissed that they made Burnout Paradise into a game which isn’t even vaguely Burnout though. Staring at a minimap whilst piling into every obstacle in the road, not being able to work out where the fuck I’m supposed to go is what GTA is all about, and is the exact opposite of what makes Burnout games.

    I still play Burnout 3, almost every week. It stands head and shoulders above BOP.

    There’s a place for openworld. That place is not in the Burnout series.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. AHA-Lambda

    How did people not “get” Paradise? O_o

    #5 2 years ago
  6. SplatteredHouse

    Burnout Takedown was a beautiful thing. It is leaps and bounds over Paradise, as you say, Gad.

    #6 2 years ago
  7. ps3fanboy

    ea and their online passes can fuck off… ea kill online servers like flies, and that nfs games series sucked serious ass, never gonna touch it AGAIN!.

    #7 2 years ago
  8. SplatteredHouse

    those passes have put mainstream gaming in a choke-hold since their introduction. The focus has shifted in a lot of cases, and not really for the better.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. tenthousandgothsonacid

    Burnout Paradise is one of my games of this gen. It came out over 4 years ago and is still the only game to manage cross platform rock solid 60FPS at 720p even if you don’t include the fact it was all streamed off disk in an openworld environment.

    As far as it’s Burnout-ness goes, that was great too, and I’ve been in since Burnout 1. People who didn’t get it just weren’t very good at it.

    I still play it every week, hundreds of hours logged. Pure brilliance.

    My gripe with NFS is its 30 FPS nature, but given that every other arcade racing firm has gone to the wall, if that’s what it takes to keep Criterion alive then sobeit.

    [fingers still crossed for a next-gen 60 fps burnout though]

    #9 2 years ago
  10. Gadzooks!

    #9

    I’d agree that BOP was a technical marvel. Super smooth, great handling, lovely visuals.

    It wasnt anything like previous burnouts though, and didnt have any of the critical components, like long high speed tracks and splitscreen multiplayer. Instead there was identikit roads, lots of corners and no splitscreen. Decidedly un-burnout.

    I was plenty good at it, just hated it because it’s the wrong game for the name.

    #10 2 years ago
  11. deathm00n

    My opinion? Criterion made Paradise and it ruined Burnout(revenge is still the better for me) because they put nfs inside my Burnout, now criterion make Most Wanted and ruin it by putting Burnout inside my NFS. They must decide, are you doing NFS or Burnout? It’s a mess right now, not that the game isn’t looking good, but it’s more like Burnout Most Wanted, like hot pursuit was Burnout Hot Pursuit

    NFS for me ended in pro street, it was the last one true to the series… oh, forgot about undercover… nevermind, forget about it

    #11 2 years ago
  12. Cobra951

    “Revolutionary I’ll grant, I’d sing of that side all day long. But, I don’t know where the idea came from that nobody understood that game.”

    @2, exactly. What is he talking about? It all clicked within minutes, joyfully. That’s still my favorite arcade racer.

    #12 2 years ago

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