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Apple-tite for disruption: are consoles under threat?

Monday, 9th January 2012 14:11 GMT By Patrick Garratt

As we approach a generation of console tablet interfaces and Apple’s long-awaited play on the TV market, are Xbox and PlayStation in danger of being pushed out of our lives entirely? The fat lady hasn’t sung yet, says Patrick Garratt.

While we’ve already seen significant disruption in the games market related to traditional formats such as PC and mobile, Apple really could turn the whole thing on its head. Apple TV is rumoured for launch in 2013. If the date’s correct, we could see Apple at market with a console-free offering as a competitor to the next Xbox.

I just can’t take the guy seriously. He’s telling me that Apple TV could disrupt the next console generation to such a degree as to render Sony and Microsoft “irrelevant”. He seems excited about the prospect, actually.

“That’s bullshit,” I say. “It’ll cost thousands. The next PlayStations and Xboxes won’t. And what, it’s going to have a controller? Apple’s going to make a games controller?”

“It’s got OnLive built in, apparently,” he sulks. I rant on.

“So it’s going to cost about two grand US and you’ll need a mental internet connection to get a reliable service for playing triple-A. Apple isn’t a games company in the traditional sense in that it doesn’t have a content creation infrastructure like Microsoft and Sony, and it will never have. Apple TV will just be an expensive window on the App Store for people with more money than sense.”

Sometimes I really should think before I speak.

Lessons in disruption

I’ve played video games since I was a small child – I’m going to be 39 this year – and I have never before seen the games industry in such a violent state of change as it is today.

In the past year we’ve all been focusing our attention on the mobile games space as Sony and Nintendo have brought new consoles to market amid scenes of unprecedented disruption. Apple and Android have altered the face of handheld gaming beyond recognition, not so much as applying a little make-up as punching it hard enough to spread its nose from ear to ear. The core games press published countless articles last year on the relevance of of 3DS and Vita, and we’ve seen Nintendo, ostensibly the immovable handheld object, truly humbled with an awkward 3DS launch.

Fortunes have lifted with price-cutting and the arrival of some buzz software, but it’s impossible to argue against the difficulty Nintendo now faces in that market. Vita, too, has no easy prospects with its high initial retail costs and struggles to find balance between “dollar-game” culture and the realities of publishing games like Uncharted. Times have very much changed for mobile gaming.

There’s every indication that we’re about to see the same state of affairs applied to the TV games market.

The next 12 months will be very telling for “games”. We’ve seen mobile gaming endure seismic shifts recently, but we’ve watched from afar. Mobile gaming is not the centre of the games industry. The bluster, money and true attention is always, and has always been, on the TV market.

Digital distribution. PC owns its ass.

The reality, of course, is that the current console business has already been disrupted, by both modern PC gaming and the onset of digital distribution. Steam, for example, has now achieved 5 million concurrent users and 40 million accounts. PC has emerged as the default platform for open-ended creativity, despite indie-related efforts from both Microsoft and Sony. An extended console cycle has seen a large segment of the core user-base invest in PC gaming – every VG247 staffer has bought a new gaming PC in the past year – and traditional publishers are well aware of the potential in the PC space in the coming years. The digital revenue of PC gaming in its entirety – MMO, triple-A, casual, F2P, whatever else – is expected to rise from $18 billion in calendar 2011 to $24.1 billion in 2013. Console digital sales, by comparison, will climb from $3.1 billion to $4.3 billion in the same time-frame. Consoles, at least in their current form, are clearly ill-suited to match digital’s distribution mountain goatish ascendance of the coming years’ Everest of e-cash.

That said, we’ve seen a great deal of hyperbole in the last few years about the importance of the PC in the current market, and it’s important to not get carried away with the whole “death of consoles” argument. The bulk of games revenue comes from consoles. In the last four recorded quarters – the 12 months ending September 30, 2011 – EA brought in $709 million revenue from PC, compared to $1.18 billion from 360 and $1.12 billion from PS3.

There’s no denying, though, the current solidity of PC gaming; while total PC revenue for that period actually fell from $733 million in the previous year compared to a rise in total console sales from $2.37 billion to $2.62 billion, EA brought in more money from PC than it did from PS3 in its last quarter, as it did in the second quarter of the previous year. Steam, meanwhile, doubled both revenue and data delivery in 2011 over 2010.

In EA’s full-year 2011 earnings call, John Riccitiello said: “The consumer has changed. 200 million console players have become 1.5 billion consumers gaming on multiple devices.” Nintendo, Sony and Microsoft’s consoles are not the games market any more. They’re merely part of it.

Over the past two cycles there’s no doubt that we’ve seen large-scale changes, but we’ve never seen a threat to the format itself. That could be about to change.

Jostling in the console space is nothing new. Console gaming’s history is one of disruption. Sony harried Nintendo with PlayStation in the mid-90s. PlayStation 2 failed to stop the pig-headed Microsoft entering the market with Xbox in 2001, and PlayStation 3 was forced to fight for its life against Xbox 360 in the current generation. Over the past two cycles there’s no doubt that we’ve seen large-scale changes, but we’ve never seen a threat to the format itself.

That could be about to change.

Battle of the TV

While we’ve already seen significant disruption in the games market related to traditional formats such as PC and mobile, Apple really could turn the whole thing on its head. Apple TV is rumoured for launch in 2013.If the date’s correct, we could see Apple at market with a console-free offering as a competitor to the next Xbox. My scoffing about control was, in retrospect, ridiculous; any iTouch device could be used as a control method. The App Store on a new generation of televisions could revolutionise developers’ ability to reach into people’s lives, bringing the tiny-game mentality to sitting room evenings and potentially unlocking a new route into the home for triple-A developers and publishers.

If Apple TV does take hold as a games outlet, the entire notion of dedicated gaming set-top boxes could be made old-fashioned to a large audience, and that audience is likely to be distinctly broader than the current console market. We could see Microsoft and Sony under pressure from Apple over Xbox and PlayStation in the same way Vita and 3DS have suffered in the past year. Why buy a 720 or PS4 when you have an Apple TV and an iPhone? Are we going to see Microsoft and Sony fight to differentiate their hardware from Apple’s offering as Sony and Nintendo were forced with Vita and 3DS?

Again, it’s important to keep feet on the ground. It’s clear Nintendo – and, seemingly, Microsoft – is perfectly aware of Apple’s threat. Wii U has a tablet controller, and it’s highly likely the next Xbox and PlayStation will feature similar functionality in some form. This is because of iPad, and it shows that the current major players in the games market don’t lumber to the point of being unable to adapt.

Equally, it’s important to remind ourselves just how invested the likes of Microsoft and Sony have become in the games market. Will Apple TV provide lip-reading motion tech? Or match the hard-won, dedicated infrastructures of PSN or Live? Or even provide a dedicated gaming experience? Of course not. Just as there’s room for Apple to disrupt, there’s room for the demonstrably vicious Microsoft and Sony to cling onto their hold on the games market with every ounce of strength.

It’s unlikely Apple can make Xbox and PlayStation irrelevant in the next generation. Consoles have their place. Whether or not Apple TV is the beginning of the end for “traditional” living room games hardware is another matter.

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28 Comments

  1. Freek

    If Apple TV will disrupt anything it’ll be Nintendo. They have the casual audiance at the moment, who can be easely switched over by cheap casual games.
    The person who plays Call of Duty or Uncharted on the other hand is not going to care about Angry Birds HD.

    Ofcourse you have to wonder how cheap it’ll be. Phone cost are hidden away in subscription plans so it doesn’t feel like you just spend 800 bucks on a smart phone.
    TV’s don’t have that luxery. You pay upfront and with Apple products that’s going to be ALLOT.

    #1 3 years ago
  2. ManuOtaku

    As i do agree a lot with this article, nice tittle by the the way very original, and especially as a fan of that record, i think dedicated home consoles will be relevant if they can introduce new ways, like the wii did in this generation, i think games in the short term will not need tv at all, with holographics devices, thats the true 3D, and that will make dedicated home consoles manufactures able to turn things again to its favour, in case this Apple treat really takes form and become a reality, Therefore i think Sony, Microsoft and nintendo, and hopefully sega again, needs to think outside the box to keep gaming on homes fresh, new and with interesting ways of interactions.

    #2 3 years ago
  3. DSB

    It’s worth noting, Pat, that while EA traditionally bring in more revenue on 360 and PS3, they also offer more titles on both platforms. I’m pretty sure that if you could tally the number of titles in comparison to the revenue, the PC would match them every step of the way.

    300-400 million dollars less – With none of EAs sportsgames on PC? Makes perfect sense to me. You can pretty much count on every Madden, FIFA or NHL bringing in way over the average 50 millon dollars in revenue. Maybe even NCAA among those, none of which are available on PC. I don’t know if Tiger Woods is available on PC or not.

    The same can be said for other interesting games like Shadows of the Damned and NBA Jam, so with that in mind I’m actually pretty sure that the PC is turning a greater average with those 700 million.

    The ammount of revenue you pull in is going to be relative to the ammount of investment, and the quality of those investments.

    #3 3 years ago
  4. Patrick Garratt

    @3 – It’s a good point, yep. I’ve got someone on IM here saying they saw an internal presentation last week saying PC revenue would eclipse console revenue in the US and Europe by 2014.

    #4 3 years ago
  5. Gheritt White

    Everyone has being saying for ages that the next gen will be the last traditional console gen. Who’s to say that it won’t be disrupted half-way through its life-cycle?

    #5 3 years ago
  6. Erthazus

    I’m not sure that this will be the last traditional console gen and i hope that it will end eventually, but it won’t.

    The reason for this is simple, soon there will be another format http://uk.ign.com/articles/2010/07/26/sony-developing-successor-to-blu-ray

    that can hold 1 TB on the single disc which means that no fucking way there will be the internet in the upcoming years that can support so much memory. Some games already require 1 TB in the development stage, so 10 more years and there will be games with 500GB – 1TB on the single disc.
    Digital only is not possible for every game in the future. IMHO.

    Apple TV is Apple TV. They can GTFO. It’s not going to be a game changer and they won’t include games controller and there won’t be a lot of exclusives and etc.

    OnLive? I’m sorry. It’s a complete suckage right now, unless you are super casual and play Mass Effect 2 on your couch for 1 hour.

    Even Call Of duty fratboys require precision and fast movement in which OnLive lacks for now, not to mention about latency issues.

    #6 3 years ago
  7. Rain

    i think all of you guys are missing a point,apple no longer has what it takes to change the whole thing.well,pat you really fear that apple creates a tv and beats samsung lg and sony together in terms of sales?look at the market,how can apple beat all the three? apple cant even disrupt.
    are we really comparing a 50 million bucks sony game with a tiny one trick pony game on app store?
    open your eyes.apple is on free fall.ios is nearly killed by the relentless force of android.so is for mac os.

    #7 3 years ago
  8. Christopher Jack

    Apple likes to maintain a pompous look, they’ll never take gaming seriously. Although, if the PSV is any indication, the ARM architecture is almost ready for the big screen as far as gaming is concerned but by the time the octacores come & are able to deliver similar performance to the PS360, the next generation of consoles will have already hit, being another 3-4 times as powerful, minimum!

    The biggest threat to conventional console gaming are probably HTPCs but they’ve been too slow to pick up steam… Now that I think of it, I reckon it’d be a pretty good idea for someone like Valve to partner with someone to release a dedicating gaming HTPC.

    Tablets are also another factor, especially with Microsoft’s Windows 8 on the horizon & their emphasis on the touch screen interface.

    Microsoft & Google seem to be the only ones likely to truly shift the industry, while Apple may have the potential, I doubt that they would ever act upon it.

    #8 3 years ago
  9. Gheritt White

    Apple is in freefall? Pull the other one!

    I’m not an Apple fan, but come on!

    #9 3 years ago
  10. Da Man

    I would call pompous people who advice their customers to work more hours to purchase a ‘huge financial investment’.Or probably those who say ‘no self respecting young man would play Mario’. But hey, to each their own.

    #10 3 years ago
  11. OlderGamer

    Another good read, Pat.

    Some thing that pop into my mind:

    I have been saying 150usd+ dedicated gaming handhelds with limited functions and 50usd games are a dying breed. Simply said that market will continue to shrink in terms of % over the next ten years. Nothing new there, imo.

    Consoles will change dramaticly. I think you can argue they already have been. What was once a dedicated gaming console already has evolved into set top box multi media devices. I think the evolution of that is the convergence of PC and console.

    I think the “platform” that we have come used to talking about(xbox360, PS3) will change from a simple perpritory piece of dedicated hardware into a “service”. What do I mean? Look at the Wii. Nintendo “service” is that it not only offers Wii games, but it also plays NES, SNES, and N64(and other) pervious systems games. Nintendo is selling you their brand wrapped up into their platform. It may well be that we headed for a day when you can have the Nintendo Libary/”platform”/Brand streamed/digitaly doanloaded on a generic piece of hardware. The same type of way you can Onlive on any manufactures netbook/notebook/etc. think of it this way, do you need another peice of hardware to watch just HBO? And a seperate one to be able to watch just Food network?

    Nope, down right crazy to do that. And I am betting that in the future games will be similar to that. Sega launched a Sega Chanel in the US just before the launch uf the Sega Saturn. It was a cable TV chanel that allowed the subscriber to attach a device to their Gen(Mega Drive) and play around 50 Gen games. One fee, 50 games, the libary changed month to month. Sound like TV for games? Thats what I am thinking we will see down the road.

    I think that is why we are seeing a resurgance and refocus from Sony on first party franchises that they own the rights to. I think they are trying to build their brand.

    I think we will continue to see the evolution of set top boxes. I think we will see more players making them. And I think Apple is well suited to take a legit stab at that emerging market.

    So to me it makes sense.

    A couple of other things.

    I don’t expect games to continue to grow in size and graphical power. Well, I do, but not by leaps and bounds from where we at now. We are not going see multi TB sized game code. Not anytime soon. That seems like a dumb statement to some I am sure. And given the past expansion plausable that growth will be rampant. But I say no.

    I say next gen will not be the leaps an bounds that many expect. I expect wider color paletes, smoother frame rates, hopefully better AI, full screen AA, and a few other bells an whistles. I am not expecting Pixar Studios level graphics.

    Why?

    Dev cycles and profits.

    Game pubs are not going to want to keep games in dev for years and years. The investments are too big and so are the risks. That type of thinking is why we are seing the resurgence of the indie driven PC market to begin with. It means pubs will only want to make the same ole game franchises. Proven and safe.

    There is a magical slider out there in video game dev/pub land that show investment vs profit. Look at your indie market. Look at the potiental of Minecraft, Angry Birds, or even something bigger like Tourchlight 1/2. Lots of money to be made pushing out smaller, easier to publish, cheaper to make, quicker to develop games. We have already been seing that trend over the past few years with Arcade/indie style games and mobile games(seems every week we read about another studio refocusing on casual/mobile phones).

    Think Pop-Cap.

    There is a ton of cash to be made doing high profile, low budget games seeling at price points that more people can aford. Apples and oranges(no pun intended) but do you know how off putting something like CoD plus map pack dlc(even with elite) can be to people? My point here is that the biz model we now see in place could also stand to evolve, and I think we will see that happen.

    I don’t really think the future(next gen and beyond) is going to be about high powered, high dollar game focused hardware. I think we will see subscription based platforms, a focus on multi media, and a growth in expanded markets that care a lot less about so called core games, and more about having fun experiences that they can afford.

    Lastly, think about what would happen if Apple TV hardware was free with a paid 2/3 year subscription. What if it included an expanded Onlive games line(with games from Namco, Capcom, Konama, Sega, Epic, EA, and other 3rd parties), included Netflix, and maybe some more suprises I am not thinking of.

    Tell me honestly that something like that wouldn’t be a game changer? I think that is where we are going in the maybe not so distant future.

    #11 3 years ago
  12. Rain

    #9
    i think apple is slowly losing market share.and in some fields like mac os they havent been good enough

    #12 3 years ago
  13. tenthousandgothsonacid

    As if by magic :

    http://www.reghardware.com/2012/01/09/lenovo_touts_worlds_first_ics_television_set/

    One more gen of traditional consoles, then they’re over

    Sony shouldn’t be too bothered, they make lots of content (films, music etc) and tellies themselves. Microsoft and Nintendo might want to find something else to do…

    #13 3 years ago
  14. Gheritt White

    @ 12: Nice you think that. Have any stats to back it up?

    @ 11: Spot on (as always).

    #14 3 years ago
  15. DSB

    I think that Apple is getting close to peaking. Even if the TV venture is succesful, most of their succes at the moment mostly hinges on people working with Apple “in spite” of things.

    They cut extremely hard deals across the board, and even if they aren’t sueing people left and right, they still do a lot to be as buttoned up as possible.

    I don’t think that sort of business model can survive in a world where everything is out in the open, and only moving towards becoming more so. It’s only going to get harder to reach customers if you don’t want to actually engage with them.

    Of course if the US decides to cripple technological progress and freedom of information by passing SOPA or PIPA, then the Apple techno-fascism has won the day, but there are quite a number of things that get swept under the carpet because we just love their stuff.

    I don’t know of many other companies that could get away with slave labor, patent abuse, and censorship while lowballing almost everyone they depend on for content.

    I love their hardware, but definitely not the business.

    #15 3 years ago
  16. The_Red

    Thanks again for another great read. I’m still not sure about Apple TV’s chances when it comes to the game market. It all depends on how we define the market in discussion. Hardcore, casuals and the people in between have to be separated.

    A tablet controller won’t work for middle group as well as some of the hardcore players: People that buy Call of Duty games everyday love their traditional controllers and in my humble opinion, won’t trade that for a tablet controller . Casuals and some of the hardcore gamers on the other hand could welcome the new methods to play the game. In short, most of best selling AAA games will still be part of MS & Sony’s game market.

    Then there is PC, where some of the most hardcore won’t even think about a lot of stuff that might be on Apple TV or consoles.

    #16 3 years ago
  17. Virginityrocks

    @8 Anyone who doesn’t use the HTPC format in their living room either don’t have the space for it, or are simply blind to it’s superiority over any other substitute.

    #17 3 years ago
  18. freedoms_stain

    The only thing that could get me to buy an Apple product for any purpose is Half-Life 3 Exclusivity.

    Nothing less.

    I detest the way Apple operate in every field.

    #18 3 years ago
  19. IL DUCE

    Yeah, consoles have been around for 30+ yrs…they’re not going anywhere

    #19 3 years ago
  20. DSB

    @19 Kinda like carrier pigeons.

    #20 3 years ago
  21. deathgaze

    @20 Fun fact: Carrier pigeons are still used in parts of the Himalayas. Another fun fact: It’s hard to find technologies that disappear completely once created. They always stick around.

    The relevant question is whether consoles will still be, well, relevant in the post-OnLive/Apple TV world. My guess is that consoles will still remain relevant for at least another few years, at least until all game purchases are digital and/or until we find a better way to control games than the ol’ twin-stick-with-shoulder-buttons rig. However, as the article points alludes to, would it necessarily be advantageous to consumers to have Apple serving all content? Ever?

    I don’t think it would be. Thus there will always be competing platforms unless all current console makers agree to a platform agnostic gaming approach. That kind of convergence could happen, but it would probably take something like, well, Apple TV for the console makers to resort to that.

    #21 3 years ago
  22. DSB

    @21 If they didn’t, what I said would’ve made no sense. Of course people “still use” carrier pigeons. Just not 99% of the planet.

    And people still use ancient cameras to take photos. People still use quarter and 2 inch tape to record music. People still use EGA applications from the late 80′s to master pop music. People still use casette tapes, or VHS tapes.

    That’s pretty much the point. There’s a ways way from being a worldwide technological standard, and to be marginalized or kept solely by nerds or people with special conditions. That’s quite arguably going somewhere, which is pretty much what has always defined technology :)

    Saying that things aren’t going to change is a bad bet on any given day.

    #22 3 years ago
  23. Patrick Garratt

    I think the pertinent question, really, is this: will the next-gen systems outsell the current generation? Will the next Xbox outsell 360? Will Vita outsell PSP? Will PS4 outsell PS3?

    My gut reaction is to say “no” on all fronts because the games market is just so much more complicated now, and we have so much more choice in the ways we consume games content. Gone are the days of a PlayStation device being able to sell 100 million units, right? PSone did 100 million sales, PS2 did 150 million, then PS3′s done 55 million to date. It’s obvious why: Xbox and, to a lesser extent, Wii. So if you throw Apple, tablets, smartphones and the new-born PC in there as well, it seems safe to predict PS4 and 720 sales will be well down on the current gen.

    And if they’re in decline, then they’re ceasing to be relevant, surely?

    I don’t see it being be an overnight thing, but I think there’s a pretty strong case for believing this coming generation being a turning point of some kind.

    #23 3 years ago
  24. Rain

    #14
    We do not need stats my friend,look at the growth of android as it takes over ios and how android smartphones are stealing the market from iphone.

    #24 3 years ago
  25. OlderGamer

    “I think the pertinent question, really, is this: will the next-gen systems outsell the current generation? Will the next Xbox outsell 360? Will Vita outsell PSP? Will PS4 outsell PS3?”

    I also think we should caution against looking at sheer numbers. I think market share is a more fair and far more important when looking at the whole picture.

    Game sales are in record numbers today. But those sales and profits are spread out across multiple places. And are also spread out across different demographics. ie, my wife with a mobile phone playing Angry Birds vs me playing FF on my PS2. The sales are still there, just in different ways.

    Very hard to do a straight numbers comparison is all I am saying.

    I think everyone would agree that gaming as an industry and hobby won’t be going anywhere, this, next, or in some future generation. But what games we play and on what hardware, and most importantly in what manor said games are delivered most certianly will change. I agree strongly that this coming generation could be a major turning point.

    I can easily envision a day when the brand name behind the games are far more important then the hardware they are running on. Might even be a posibility to see the current crop of Cable/TV/isp providers to replace their current DVR/boxes with games enabled(via cloud/streaming) features. Maybe Time Warener carries Nintendo, Sega, Acti and Sony games, while a rival providers carry Nintendo, Sega, EA, and Sony games. Sorta of like streamed, interactive gaming chanels that work like TV networks.

    I think that is still a long ways away. But still, makes a lot of sense to me.

    #25 3 years ago
  26. ManuOtaku

    #23 With all due respect i disaggre, yes the ps3 sold less than the ps2, but if you look at total sales for the dedicated gaming devices you see that theres an increase, this gen is almost surpassing the 200 million, compare with the 160 million from last gen, and its been increasing since the SNES days, therefore i believe the same will occur next gen, if they keep a good technology with great prices, thats why i do aggre with OG, the next gen will not be the increase in tech like some gamers expect it to be, it will be good bu not like this gen, in order to keep it affordable to consumers, true 1080 p will be the main focus, therefore i think the next gen will have the numbers increased again, just like all the previous gens.

    Look at handleds, once the 3ds find a good price it did started selling like hotcakes again, and i think it will do as fine as the Ds, and the same will happen to vita once it reaches and affordable price and killer apps too, the thing with the vita is that sony is already loosing money, because the tech in the vita is very expensive, but when they will be in capacity to increase the lost is another question, and the other they will do it again with their next home console?, therefore i think the same will happen to home consoles, it will have good tech with good prices, and of course innovation too to adapt it to current needs and trends

    #26 3 years ago
  27. MegaGeek1

    I sincerely hope these predictions are wrong. Console/PC gaming technology advancement is one of the few things I get excited about anymore. The last thing I, or any hardcore gamer for that matter, wants is a cheaper, lower spec “next-gen” console that pumps out Angry Birds HD on a TV.

    I think its pretty safe to say that iPads/iPhones/Android/etc.. have taken a big chunk out of the casual gaming audience that bought PS2s and pushed its sales past 150 million. Its also pretty safe to say that developers and publishers are going to go where the money is. But, I would argue that mobile gaming isn’t the cash cow that the industry wants us to believe. Strictly speaking – from a development cost vs. sales ratio perspective – the margin of profit is probably higher on mobile games. With that said, look at the margin of profit for games like COD. I know that is one franchise, and its a freak of nature, but we are talking about hundreds of millions of dollars in profits. If your going to compare mobile gamings biggest franchise, you might as well compare it to console gamings biggest franchise.

    Additionally, yea Angry Birds had over xx million downloads, but how many of those 10s of millions of downloads were at 4.99, then 1.99, then .99 and eventually free? We will probably never know, but I bet a large portion of those highly touted “downloads” were at either a substantial discount, or free. If you were a greedy, Bobby Kotick dictated publisher, what would you want; 50 Million downloads at a maximum average of 2.50 per download, or 15 million purchases at 60 bucks a pop?

    If the future of gaming is going to be exclusively mobile or streamed, I will be taking up another hobby. Fuck me for wanting 4K HD open game worlds the size my city, with NPCs that never say the same thing twice, and graphics so realistic I never ever want to leave my couch and go back to the drudgery of my mundane life!

    #27 3 years ago
  28. poketrainer

    Short answer: No. Here are some reasons why Nintendo, Microsoft, Sony don’t have to worry about these new emerging platforms

    All will co-exist

    #28 3 years ago

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