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Ubisoft DRM software “vital to our business”, says Conviction creative lead

Friday, 16th April 2010 10:37 GMT By Johnny Cullen

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Splinter Cell: Conviction creative director Max Béland has told VG247 that Ubisoft’s DRM software is considered “vital” to the success of its games on PC.

Speaking in an exclusive interview concerning the game, he told us the firm would continue to deliver “creative and innovative games” for the platform.

“We consider that protecting our PC games is vital to our business,” said Béland, “and will allow us to continue investing in the development of creative and innovative games on the PC platform.”

Ubisoft’s DRM system has come in for a bit of a kicking recently, as it requires you to have a constant internet connection to play online.

It was thought last month that the withdrawal of Ubi titles Silent Hunter V and Assassin’s Creed II from Steam in the UK were down to the issue, but was, in fact, down to a business decision.

On the same day that was discovered, the firm delayed the PC version of Conviction until April 29: its gone on record since to clarify the delay wasn’t down to the controversial software.

Get our full interview with Max Béland here. Watch the first 20 minutes of Conviction for Xbox 360, which releases today, here.

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17 Comments

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  1. Erthazus

    O’rly?

    DRM failed when people already playing with cracked server emulator. Ubi can just shut up.

    #1 4 years ago
  2. endgame

    so vital that I will not buy this game just because of that.

    #2 4 years ago
  3. loki

    PC port fail anyway, like Assassins Creed 2

    #3 4 years ago
  4. Bulk Slash

    More fail from Ubisoft on their DRM. They just can’t admit that it’s shit can they?

    #4 4 years ago
  5. blackdreamhunk

    US gov’t admits piracy estimates are phony

    http://www.neoseeker.com/news/13600-us-govt-admits-piracy-estimates-are-phony/

    ubisoft your a lair!

    #5 4 years ago
  6. dirigiblebill

    From your link, BDH:

    ‘Of course, piracy is definitely a problem, and the GOA agrees, describing it as “sizeable”…’

    #6 4 years ago
  7. blackdreamhunk

    dirigiblebill

    looks like if they have problems with real numbers, so how credible is the gaming Industry? If the numbers are phoney means some one lies. The gaming Industry is known to be untruthful when it comes to pc gaming from pc gaming dying every year

    proof here

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=seOJpCcY-4w

    proof list of just of pc games found here

    http://adrianwerner.wordpress.com/about/

    even to gaming analyst like Pachter. Pachter said console gaming is more power than pc gaming which is false

    proof here

    http://www.gametrailers.com/video/episode-108-pach-attack/63343

    facts about pc gaming fund here

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h-j69RnEBAc
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4GPI9xDmRjk
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Y2nJmKzOVY

    how can I trust any thing that the gaming media says. for all I know those piracy numbers maybe really small.

    all this drm junk could just be big companies trying to force pc gamers in buying out dated old pc hardware at high price (consoles).

    microsoft and sony have lost billions on consoles too.

    proof here
    http://www.wired.com/gamelife/2009/05/e3-predictions/

    #7 4 years ago
  8. satsugai

    @endgame
    Damn right, this’ll be the first time I haven’t bought a game due to the DRM.

    #8 4 years ago
  9. Happy Hardon Harry

    I find it pathetic that gamers won’t buy a game just because of DRM.

    You see it mentioned on most customer reviews for PC games on Amazon, etc. Amazon should really take down such reviews as they don’t talk about the actual game, it’s all DRM blah, blah, talk.

    Developers are just protecting their IP. How would you feel if you put thousands of working hours into something, only to see some wanker on the net abuse it.

    Anyway, AC2 on the PC was the definitive version of the game, regardless of it’s DRM. It takes the console versions round the back of the shed for a beating, that’s for sure.

    #9 4 years ago
  10. satsugai

    It’s called voting with our wallet. If enough of us don’t buy the game hopefully they’ll release a patch to remove the wretched thing.

    #10 4 years ago
  11. NGCes26294BIV

    “for all I know those piracy numbers maybe really small.”

    So say that were true, why use DRM?

    It’s there for a reason. Whether you like it or not, piracy IS an issue.

    #11 4 years ago
  12. blackdreamhunk

    use drm to try and force pc gamers into buying consoles! I would say that consoles gaming has a lot bigger problem with high production costs,rented games and the used game market than pc gaming and it’s piracy.

    #12 4 years ago
  13. Gekidami

    “use drm to try and force pc gamers into buying consoles!”

    Because spending money to publish PC versions of a game with some form of disadvantage is a totally better way at getting PC gamers on consoles then say… Oh, i dont know; Just releasing the game on consoles and not PC. Right?

    lolconspiracytheoristslol

    #13 4 years ago
  14. blackdreamhunk

    there has been over 11 000 console game devs who have went bankrupt because of consoles.

    there was a lot of great franchises that were born on pc only to die on consoles

    #14 4 years ago
  15. rocketman71

    The only vital thing for PC (and consoles) is to make sure that NOBODY buys a single game from those Ubi assholes.

    #15 4 years ago
  16. DeSpiritusBellum

    @11 So how come the highest grossing games don’t use invasive DRM? It doesn’t entirely add up, although it is obvious that a lot of people are helping themselves.

    The music business as well as the gaming industry have been spinning this yarn since the late 80′s. First it was floppy discs and tapes, now it’s torrents or rapidshare. That doesn’t lend them a whole lot of credibility, considering that their market value has probably risen by a good 500-1000% since then.

    There’s no doubt most of that is now due to consoles, but I don’t see how applying DRM that makes their games less enjoyable is going to help them.

    I wouldn’t be against DRM as long as it was made worth my while. There’s no way I’m going to accept a game that’s basically rented from a publisher (meaning it only works when the publisher services it) for the same price as one that I’d actually own. Why pay the same price for a game you can’t play when you want? Slash it to half the cost of a real copy and I might consider it.

    #16 4 years ago
  17. Joe_Gamer

    Their DRM strategy is vital to my wallet staying fat, I’m not buying anything that comes with this crap. Here’s a very good explanation of the real purpose of DRM, piracy is the scapegoat, creating artificial scarcity is the real goal.

    http://arstechnica.com/media/news/2007/01/8616.ars

    #17 4 years ago