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Dishonored: too short? You’re doing it wrong

Tuesday, 9th October 2012 08:17 GMT By Brenna Hillier

Dishonored has achieved a remarkable critical consensus, but nobody seems able to agree on how long it is. Is nine missions too few to justify a triple-A price tag? Not at all, says Brenna Hillier.

Dishonored is a playground and everyone is invited to do whatever they bloody well like, and this is so far removed from what we’ve been taught to expect of triple-A first person titles that a contingent of players simply aren’t going to understand that on their first try.

Dishonored only has nine missions: this is a fact which may cause you concern. There are plenty of people who say this is enough, provided you take your time rather than rush, and you are right, based on historical incidents, to be mistrustful of them. Whenever a game with a distinctive aesthetic turns up people get starry-eyed and start throwing around terms like “embedded narrative” and “player-authored experiences,” and you’re well within your rights to do a little sick as a result; we can’t all get excited about the high-concept stuff.

If Dishonored were in this category I would even now be crafting a paragraph exhorting you to stop and reconstruct a story from the carefully scattered teacups in an abandoned room, and you’d be yawning and closing the tab. Happily, it’s not. You don’t need to spend an hour looking at broken crockery in order to pad out your gameplay time. Enjoying Dishonored isn’t about stopping to smell the roses and write sickening fanfics; it’s about playing the game.

Really playing it, I mean – playing with it. Dishonored is a playground and everyone is invited to do whatever they bloody well like, and this is so far removed from what we’ve been taught to expect of triple-A first person titles that a contingent of players simply aren’t going to understand that on their first try.

If you finish Dishonored in six hours, son, you played it wrong; and you played it as you’ve been taught to by the successive waves of tightly linear games which have dominated the triple-A scene for years. Following the mission markers and completing objectives is, of course, the “point” of the game but unlike Lure of Glory: Combat Zone XVII if you stop moving forward the game does not obligingly halt and wait for you. It doesn’t constrain you to an A-to-B path where looking behind you shows only empty rooms. There is no advantage to taking the quickest route beyond the fact that it is the quickest route, and by following it you will quite literally miss most of the game and do yourself a right disservice.

Let me level with you, friends. I don’t count hours when I play but I’m pretty sure my first run through of Dishonored was less than ten hours. That’s not a lot, although metrics suggest it may well be too much for many of you (think about your pile of unfinished games when we hit 2047 and all single-player campaigns can be completed on your tea break). I consider this first play through to have been wrong. I needed to learn the rules and see the story quickly so I could do a second play ahead of review deadline, and while I had a smashing time and would highly recommend that ten hour experience to anyone, I didn’t get anywhere near as much joy as when I began my third, unhurried, post-deadline pass.

Doing it right.

This time, I peeked into corners; talked to NPCs; listened to the fever-dream whisperings of the Heart; tracked down side quests; experimented with different strategies and abilities; sought out all the runes and bone charms to expand my repertoire; purchased upgrades; communed with the Outsider.

And that’s not even half of what I could do, if I chose. I’m not reading the books or standing patiently around while NPCs blather; I’m not being pedantic about collecting every item or getting perfect stats; I’m not quicksaving and reloading for any reason other than fun. And yet: I’m not finished this new playthrough after 20 hours. I’m having the time of my life, despite having nominally (but not actually) seen it all twice already. I strongly resent not being back at it right now.

Dishonored is like your career, your love life and your education – you get out what you put in. If you want to speed run it in six hours you are welcome to do so. If you want to spend upwards of 40 on a save-and-reload completionist run you are at liberty to pursue this. Neither of these extremes appeal to me in the slightest but until the revolution comes I am not in charge of you: nobody can stop you from deliberately not enjoying yourself and then complaining about it on the Internet if that’s what fires your loins.

Don’t be that guy. Give Dishonored a bit of respect, do yourself a favour and remember how to have some fun.

Dishonored releases in the US today and in the EU on Friday.

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56 Comments

  1. Talkar

    Some times it doesn’t matter how good the game is, if it isn’t 20+ hours when it is also a single player game. Just look at RAGE. That was a astonishingly good game, yet it wasn’t perceived as being very good, mostly because of how short it was.

    #1 2 years ago
  2. Patrick Garratt

    I think this is spot on, based on what I’ve played. The “gamer” in me rushes to each story objective marker just to get it out of the way, but I’m finding that if I just calm down, look around and “be” the character the game’s so much more rewarding. Best thing I’ve played for a good while, to be honest.

    #2 2 years ago
  3. GK

    “If you finish Dishonored in six hours, son, you played it wrong”-this is nonsense sentence! there are no wrong playing or right,there are just good players and bad players. if you finish game in so short time,its creators problem and not a gamers.blame yourself to put easy ways,overpower powers or something else if you want to blame.

    #3 2 years ago
  4. Dave Cook

    Yep, only someone who likes wasting £40 on games will play it by speed running and shooting everyone. Using restraint and stealth to non-lethally achieve your goal is so utterly satisfying. It’s a rare feeling.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. Pytox

    Nice article Dave :D Can’t wait for it to arrive
    Can you also kick AI just like in Dark Messiah?

    #5 2 years ago
  6. Dave Cook

    @5 Brenna wrote this one :)

    #6 2 years ago
  7. Edo

    @1 Thanks for the laughs.

    #7 2 years ago
  8. G1GAHURTZ

    I never understood this way of thinking.

    The first time I finished Wind Waker, I blazed through it, and was left very disappointed by the ending.

    It was about 15 hours of actual gameplay and about another 15 sailing around in a boat, fishing for stuff.

    I mentioned it to a colleague at work, who was still only a few hours into it, and he seemed to have the idea that it was my fault for ‘rushing’ through it.

    So what am I supposed to do?

    Walk around and enjoy the view?

    Talk to random NPCs who have nothing to do with the main quest and pretend that the conversations matter?

    I think that a game needs to provide you with actual gameplay, rather than replying on you to amuse yourself before you can get your money’s worth.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. Fraser Sim

    If I want character I read a book, I’m not looking for that in a game, I’m looking for action and fulfillment. I don’t want to have to play games slow, they should be able to keep up with me, not me having to slow down for them. I normally 100% agree with this site, but this time I’ll have to disagree. But I think it’s a subjective view.

    #9 2 years ago
  10. Telepathic.Geometry

    Some of my favourite games ever have been ‘short’. Vanquish, Ico, Rez… I would say that I like short games with high density, games where you can replay the game with a totally different character or in a completely different way, and get a new experience.

    In this game, it seems like you can play the game listening in to every conversation and finding the best line through the game without killing anyone, or you could go through as an assassin and back-stab and stealth kill your way to the end. Or, just go balls to the wall and kill everybody…

    It’s all good.

    #10 2 years ago
  11. Dave Cook

    @8 different scenario altogether mate. Adding time to Dishonored is not just about picking up texts, speaking to people and doing nothing. It’s meticulous planning, being stealthy, exploring alternate routes, and achieving victory by being smart and non-lethal.

    It gives way much more gratification than just simply shooting everything. It’s a rare feeling that fans of stealth games know all too well. it’s brilliant.

    #11 2 years ago
  12. Talkar

    @11
    While i completely agree with you, what you are saying is totally subjective. There are some people out there who don’t find it rewarding to think, plan, execute said plan, fail, retry. I count myself among the people who very much like to spend hours, some times even a day just to plan out the perfect way to dispose of someone in Hitman, so i think i’ll enjoy this game, based on what i’ve read. But there still are some people who don’t enjoy that.
    Now someone could argue those people shouldn’t play these kind of games at all then, and they might be right.

    #12 2 years ago
  13. Dave Cook

    @12 Absolutely subjective, I agree :)

    #13 2 years ago
  14. Demigod

    @1 Rage was a very good game BUT its last chapter was very obviously truncated. It was missing side missions the rest for the game had and the rather subpar driving shooty bit was simply made harder in the end(mass’s of tanks) to roadblock you from the end. The end seemed to come in the middle of the narrative. The end was more of a tv mid season break than a games end. That was why it was seen as too short, not just because of the time it took to get there but because the end wasnt an end.

    #14 2 years ago
  15. jacobvandy

    RAGE sucked because there was no end-boss… Or at least that was it for me. Very decent run-up was wasted, and the entire experience gets rated mediocre at best.

    As for Dishonored, I just took about 4 hours to play through the first mission, with its half-dozen explorable areas containing side quests and hidden collectibles. I’m being sort of stealthy/lethal, and I rarely reload a save just because I was detected. Sometimes I get into big brawls because I screwed up, and that’s fine.

    A major part of having to slow down and actually pay attention to what I’m doing is that I turned off most of the UI junk. No magic floating objective markers for me to blindly run toward — I actually have to read the journal and follow street signs, etc. It’s like the difference between Morrowind and Oblivion, makes for WAY more immersion and satisfaction once I manage to get something done because the game wasn’t holding my hand the entire time.

    The tutorial pop-ups are bad enough, literally telling you all the different ways you can approach specific obstacles, which I hope is going to be isolated to that first mission. (Yes, you can disable those, too, but I was wanting to learn about the basic mechanics.)

    #15 2 years ago
  16. viralshag

    Now I’m disappointed I pre-ordered this game.

    #16 2 years ago
  17. Patrick Garratt

    @17 – You shouldn’t be. It’s brilliant.

    #17 2 years ago
  18. ps3fanboy

    @15

    RAGE sucked because of horrible texture popping, bad framerates and a bland story… not because it was missing a end boss (the only good thing with RAGE, was that it didn’t have an idiotic end bosses that you gotta shoot 1000 times)

    As for Dishonored, its a short game and i welcome that. i just hate games that force you to play more than 8 hours at first play through. the second play through when i have learned the game, i take more time playing it. so with two play through there will be total of 16 hours or more, its perfect. doing a 60 hours play through at first time is just a overkill.

    #18 2 years ago
  19. Ireland Michael

    @8 Of course you don’t understand it. You’re too busy playing Lure of Glory: Combat Zone XVII.

    Rushing through Dishonoured is liking taking a trip to Paris just to see the Eiffel Tower. Sure, its one of the main highlights, but it’s not the only thing there.

    #19 2 years ago
  20. G1GAHURTZ

    Oh O’Connor, you’re so refined…

    #20 2 years ago
  21. absolutezero

    Welcome to the current generation. Immersion has been shot in the head and I desire instant gratification or I’m leaving.

    #21 2 years ago
  22. Dragon246

    @19,
    Really? Are linear games that bad?
    Last I checked, most of the best selling games were “linear experience” ones.Different games, different crowds. COD is at the top for a reason.
    Game lengths cant satisfy everyone. I know people who will blast any game if its smaller than gta4.
    Game looks ace, but I dont have time for the next 2 months. Will be playing it sometime afterwards.

    #22 2 years ago
  23. G1GAHURTZ

    Why sneak around for 2 hours (or a whole day, according to Talkar) trying to stab someone in the back, when you can kick down the door and shoot them in the face, like a man?

    #23 2 years ago
  24. absolutezero

    Gratification.

    “I love it when a plan comes togethor” over and above “hurr durr guns durr explosions hurr.”

    capiche?

    I do enjoy how having options is now seen as a negative and that being given a choice even within a game where theres no negative consequence at forging a more challenging path alot of people are taking the easy way out. Then complaining about it and blaming the game for them being given options.

    Which is nice. and not at all retarded.

    #24 2 years ago
  25. G1GAHURTZ

    It was my plan to shoot him in the face!

    Think of a plan and execute it a fraction of a second. Now that is a sweet feeling.

    It requires insta-skill.

    Perhaps that’s what others are lacking…

    #25 2 years ago
  26. absolutezero

    ppppfffffffff aha ha ha haha

    Actually now that I think about it thats one of the reasons why Crysis 2 was so poor and forgettable. Where I remember planning and then executing a variety of different plans created under pressure, the second game became a series of trigger response mindless battles.

    Rote repitition and hum drum action. The Future of gaming is bright.

    #26 2 years ago
  27. KrazyKraut

    I love stealth games and the last game I had the choice between sneaking and action was in Goldeneye Wii. Ofc it needs more time, but the reward is higher and you feel like a goddamn Ninja.

    #27 2 years ago
  28. zinc

    Is it open world like GTA, or is it a series of open-world playgrounds like Hitman: Blood Money?

    #28 2 years ago
  29. Dave Cook

    @28 a series of open world playgrounds that offer so many hidden routes, paths and possibilities. Very well crafted.

    #29 2 years ago
  30. zinc

    @30, Good, I liked that about Blood Money :-)

    #30 2 years ago
  31. Ireland Michael

    @22 Linear games are great. The point is, this isn’t one.

    Imagine playing Fallout 3 and only doing the main quest. It’s basically the same thing here.

    #31 2 years ago
  32. hitnrun

    Very strong write-up Brenna, even though you contradicted yourself a bit between the first paragraph and the rest of the article.

    All-in-all, this sort of length structure is perfect for modern games, and I wish more had it. If you want to suck the marrow out of the world for a few dozen hours, you can. If you’re determined to play and FINISH a highly anticipated game without allowing another freaking title to come near your Pile of Shame, you can. Everybody wins.

    #32 2 years ago
  33. zinc

    @31, if the setup is like Blood Money, then it is a linear game, set in a series of open world environments. One mission leading to another.

    Unless of course you can choose in which order you do the missions? Is that the case?

    #33 2 years ago
  34. Dave Cook

    @33 there are tons of optional missions, so many ways to complete missions, so many routes, hidden paths, ways to do things. It’s like a massive toolset that is yours to use as you see fit.

    #34 2 years ago
  35. Len

    Switch of all the objective markers, whack it on hard and off you go. :)

    #35 2 years ago
  36. TheWulf

    It’s interesting because my favourite online experiences (Champions Online and Guild Wars 2) have the same problem. Yes, you can rush ahead, but in doing so you miss all the fun stuff. You miss all the neat little hidden touches in zones, and all the things that you could have done. You just blast past 80 per cent of the content.

    Now, why is it like that? It’s a choice. The developers didn’t want to create some kind of life-sucking grindfest, they didn’t want a game with padding. They wanted a game where, and I must stress this, the player could choose their own pacing. It’s a noble idea, but the problem is is that the majority of people aren’t very bright.

    If you put a table of chocolates in front of people, most will gorge themselves until they’re sick, then they’ll throw it up. And we’re talking about most people, here. You know this is true. There seems to be something in the human brain, that’s commonplace, that makes people act like this. And I really can’t understand it.

    What’s the point of gorging yourself if you’re going to throw up?

    And then you have people who treat games the same way. The answer to this by some is to make the process a horrible grind, full of padding, but then those who are sensible with their gaming diet actually have to slog through this boring content which we find not fun. We can’t take things at our own pace any more, we have to go full steam ahead.

    And worse, we have to sacrifice all of our free time to the game, so you lose out on your social life, and if you have a vocation then that might become a casualty, too. Children? To hell with the kids, amirite? Getting to the next level (either map or character number) is more important than being a good parent.

    And that’s a bad mindset to have. This is why games are dangerous in the hands of people with that kind of mindset, because they can’t pace themselves. With any kind of entertainment, whether games, books, or even delicious food, you have to pace yourself. Take your time, look around, find the hidden things, and soak it up. If you’re in a rush to the end then you’re missing the point. And if a game is designed to be a rush to the end through mindless grind, then the designers are idiots.

    A game that you can speedrun through is not a bad thing. Portal 2 can be completed quickly, but does that mean it’s a bad game? No, not by a long shot. It’s just a game that allows you to take your time and poke things, and there are plenty of secrets to find.

    Hands up, how many of you playing who blasted through Portal 2 instead of taking your time actually missed out on all of the secrets? You all did. You know it, and I know it. And that’s the problem, the people who blasted through likely didn’t even realise that there were secrets there. They were just in this mad rush forward.

    No pacing. Just gorging.

    Gorge. Gorge. Gorge.

    And this kind of gorging mentality is why we have games which try to be grindy in the first place. It’s a vicious cycle, and I don’t like it one bit.

    #36 2 years ago
  37. Dannybuoy

    For some reason I really fancy some chocolate

    #37 2 years ago
  38. doa766

    the game is both great and of average lenght, it’s not a 20+ hour game

    I’m not rushing through but I am killing everyone on my path on my first playthrough, I go in to every room and loot, I look for all the runes and most of the bones and speak with everyone and I do all the side missions I can find

    and if I keep my progress speed about constant it should take me around 7-8 hours to complete it

    #38 2 years ago
  39. doa766

    I think there has to be reason to play stealthy otherwise you’re kidding yourself

    if the developers wanted to make a game that lasted 20+ hours because you had to study the levels and wait for guard rotations and stuff like that before you can make your move then they shouldn’t made the character so overpowered that you can kill 6 guars in a row just by keeping your distance and using arrows (and you can do this even without upgrading any ofensive power or the crossbow)

    IMO if you can do that then the stealh aspect is just masturbatory: why spend time hiding behind boxes for one guard to look the other way when you can just slauther six of them without breaking a sweet?

    #39 2 years ago
  40. Gekidami

    ^ Indeed, if blasting through everything CoD-style is the “wrong” way to play the game then the game should punish you for doing it, yet from what i’ve heard you play as an unstoppable God who can take on anything head-on. What is the point of stealth if you dont actually need it to get by? Try run’n'gunning though MGS2, it might be doable on easy, maybe normal if you’re careful, but most of the time once the Alert goes off, an infinite amount of heavy armoured soldiers will be heading your way and you’ll quickly understand why you need to use stealth.

    Playable characters should be adapted to the gameplay, if you have the option to avoid combat there should be a logical reason to it otherwise, as doa766 says; Its just masturbatory padding, not a worth while game mechanic.

    #40 2 years ago
  41. Maximum Payne

    @39 And what is reason to play in stealth way in Hitman games ?
    Because its more fun and game is design around it. Killing everyone is just one option if your cover is blown.

    #41 2 years ago
  42. doa766

    @41 Maximum Payne

    the reason to play stealth in Hitman is because you can not progress through the game otherwise, same goes for the Metal Gear games

    Dishonored tries for a “choose yourself” just like approach just like Deus Ex HR but it fails in what that game nailed: it doesn’t matter how you rank up or which abilities you upgrade you can still kill everybody in your path without much trouble

    I’m halfway through Dishonored right now and let me tell you: it can take a long time to get around a guarded entry without alerting the guards, but it can take one minute to kill them all, and after you kill the two or three guards standing next to gate then maybe three more come out, after you kill those nothing happens, all the bodies stay there on the street and you just walk in (you can move the bodies but nothing changes if you do) and whatever is going on inside the place you’re trying to get into is not affected by how you got into it

    so there’s really no point in trying for stealth unless you’re going for a no kill run, but that’s like finishing a game in the hardest difficulty or finding all the inteligence laptops on a COD game, not everyone will want to do it

    #42 2 years ago
  43. zinc

    In Hitman: Blood Money you could easily progress, no matter how loud you went. In GTA4 you can slaughter hundreds as long as you can find a spray shop or safehouse.

    Dishonoured is a game which allows YOU to choose your path. If you want to run & gun you can, if you want to stealth it you can.

    To criticise it for not punishing a play-style over another is really missing the point.

    #43 2 years ago
  44. Phoenixblight

    @43

    Agreed. All the Hitman Games you can practically go at it if you wanted to as a run and gun type thinking though you really removing 90% of the game doing something like that.

    #44 2 years ago
  45. joealberino

    at #1 – RAGE a good game?? Rage was a wanna be borderlands with some of the worst pop in I have EVER seen on any game. Have never had pop in actually spoil my game experience, it did with RAGE. Also, rage was linear feeling, and VERY repetitive. I could not believe ID had put their name on it. Anyway as to Dishonored. I don’t quite get the players that rush thru a game. Why buy a game if you are going to skip thru all the content??

    #45 2 years ago
  46. joealberino

    The most rewarding games to be are not games that are just open in the sense of the map or quests. But open in the sense of how you can tackle the game or a certain situation. Dishonored has small sand boxes that lets you pick the way you handle it, trying out all the ways and gadgets was a blast, Also, this approach gives the game a good pace.

    #46 2 years ago
  47. doa766

    imagine this for a moment: let’s say you’re trying to sneak into some area of the game and you alert the guards

    what are you going to do? run away and hide when you know you can easily kill anything the game throws at you? most likely you’ll do the latter and the next time you’re on that situation you’re just going to kill them because there’s no point in sneaking in

    there’s no rewards or moreality system, or big changes on the outcome of the mission

    #47 2 years ago
  48. Phoenixblight

    @49

    The game does give you consequences for going and doing the run and gun playstyle.

    BTW when I get caught, I do infact run and blink until the enemy is not aware of me anymore than I go for a non-lethal takedown.

    #48 2 years ago
  49. Talkar

    I just want to warn people that stealthing in this game isn’t all that great. It is far to easy which diminishes the sense of accomplishment you get after completing a level without killing anyone and without being seen by anyone…

    #49 2 years ago
  50. fightclubdoll

    Getting from beginning to end as quickly as possible does NOT a good player make.
    I prefer to play deeply and master a good game, not merely “finish” it.

    I want to make a comparison to sex here that illustrates the point, but I’ll let you just fill in those blanks yourself.

    #50 2 years ago
  51. kroegs

    Now that the game is out. I have to say I like it. But it is too short. I’ve had work all week, I get regular sleep, I’ve read the books when I see them, go after all items I can find, explore every room, and have had to explore a couple areas over and over until I could find codes to unlock a couple safes. Side quests, eh, there are a few. I’m nearly done and I imagine tomorrow after work or at the latest by sunday I will have finished my first play through.

    This is too short. I’m trying to not kill whenever possible but sometimes it just seems too tedious to reload and try again when I want to get to where I’m trying to go. I finish most missions with a half and half ratio of kills to not killing. This has some awesome gameplay but, damnit this game is just too short. I payed $60 for a weeks worth of gaming.

    The game is linear, despite what anyone says, which is fine. But it progresses similar to the witcher. Large mission stages with side missions. Only much, much shorter, and less side missions.. Though the freestyle gameplay is extremely refreshing, i just wish I had more to do with it. I really do..

    #51 2 years ago
  52. nilart

    I agree with everything you said but the game is still too short. It takes a lot to engage me into a game and finish it. I have played many games but just finished few of them. Dishonored is one of them.

    I played the first time without knowing the good and bad sides, just the way i like. Killing people but leaving some alive. I enjoy exploring (up to a point) and experiencing, just not rush and kill everyone. Silent but deadly way. I also read notes but not books. Got all runes and charms and completed game after slightly more than 20 hours but still had the same feeling as with all CoD games, intense but short. And it’s even more frustrating considering how good the experience was. I wanted MORE.

    #52 2 years ago
  53. InsaneMagic2100

    Wow guys. I love the game. Forget side missions and secrets. Dishonored is awesome anyway. I’m on mission 7 and I already had a lot of fun with it. I could play again on a higher difficulty, no problem. The game is great fun with good controls. No game is perfect and we always want more. (Thats what Dishonored 2 will be for, no?) It could of had some survival mode where you get unlimited pistol ammo and see how many enemies you can kill OR anything like that wouldn’t of hurt. Oh did I mention the story is good. No, it’s great!

    I see the “problems” though. Running around looking for charms and runes up or down on every area/mission. BUT you get to KILL, KILL and KILL some more! Save and load your game and KILL some more!!!! What the problem is? This game is almost perfect.

    I’m afraid it will get boring sooner or later; but what game doesn’t? Maybe new content for the game will be released.

    Whatever, Dishonored is a very good game no matter what anyway says about it. If you’re into buying or collecting a lot of single player games, get this one for sure. (Wouldn’t be the worst game you spent $60 on. (For sure wasn’t for me).

    I mean, Dishonored sucks! Gaming is an addiction and all the people making games know that and punish us for it! They no longer put their heart into their games, only their greed. They don’t stop to think for one second about adding some kick ass extras and challenges and bonus stuff to the game without making us pay for the content! It’s ridiculous, just ******g ridiculous!

    If you’re addicted to games, might as well buy this one, you will enjoy it. It’s a step up for sure from all the crappy money hungry quick made BS games made or being made now. At least they tried! Thank you!

    I could type some more BS but I’m going to go play …… some……. GAMES!!!!!!!

    #53 2 years ago
  54. TheDarkWeapon

    It is short… if you don’t develop the main gameplay and relay on side quest to give your game some length.. you end up with a “basic” short game.

    It’s amazing… but it’s short.

    #54 2 years ago
  55. Porqueman

    just wanted to say its stupid to say your playing the game wrong if you actually played games you would understand you can only play a game differently and that does not mean its wrong by any means

    #55 2 years ago
  56. atomos-kairos

    i made an account simply because i felt the need to back up the author and tell porqueman that yes, you can play a game wrong. can you, “literally”, play a game “wrong”, i mean not really. if you want to get all black and white about it, but we live in a world with grey areas. some games simply cannot be enjoyed if you rush through them, period.

    another recent example is bioshock infinite. they literally created a world so richly researched and developed it’s basically a period work of art. a random poster on a wall could add depth to the story. a voxophone you maybe wouldn’t even find because it’s tucked away can add an entirely new perspective to the story. but people think “omg shooter must play must kill” and get in their satisfying pewpew and 7 hours later have taken to the internet in droves about what a short bullshit ass game it was.

    no, you are bullshit. as the author so perfectly stated that i basically yipped in satisfied agreement, “nobody can stop you from deliberately not enjoying yourself and then complaining about it on the Internet if that’s what fires your loins”. if you want to rush through a game (the WRONG way) that you paid 60 dollars for to ensure that you have a short experience and multiple things to bitch about, then…ok. but you are the one to blame, not the people who made a game that it’s POSSIBLE to rush through. i’m in the middle of mission 7 on dishonored and each mission so far has taken me maybe around 3-4 hours (the boyle one had admittedly not that much to do, that one was less for me), so add that up to over 20 hours and i’m not nearly done. what have i gained over the idiots who ran through it with their heels on fire? a better appreciation for the story, the environment, the weird sci-fi historical whatever they created, the small victories from exploring really far out areas and finding shit. the list goes on.

    games are like any artform. everything that you see in front of you was put there on purpose and usually for a reason. when you read a book you don’t skip every other page. when you listen to music you don’t skip through the song. when you watch a movie you don’t fast forward at random. you COULD, but that would be the WRONG way to do it.

    #56 1 year ago

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