Ghost Recon dev compares Kinect to blow-up doll

Thursday, 26 January 2012 21:30 GMT By Brenna Hillier

Using Microsoft’s motion controller is akin to resorting to sex toys over real human interaction, according to Ghost Recon: Future Soldier IP director Adrian Lacey – a man who knows how to get a headline.

Asked by Spong whether Kinect could ever replace traditional control pads, Lacey replied with “That’s like asking whether an inflatable doll replaces a woman.”

Having said that Lacey admitted he could imagine scenarios in which Kinect might rise to prominence.

“Perhaps its uses hinge on one particular gameplay mechanic. Maybe its uses are all about hitting and dodging things with your body. Maybe it’s uses in gameplay can be as subtle as a gesture made with a controller in hand to enhance the traditional experience. Maybe it’ll get so sophisticated that it will replace all traditional methods. We’ll have to wait and see,” he explained.

“Kinect is still in the first stages, so as developers we’re still learning how to explore this. You’ve gone from traditional controllers, to iPads and iPhones in the space of four or five years.

“For us, we’re learning how these things work, so we’ve gone from the dream of Minority Report to actually being able to do it in your living room. So there’s a learning curve for us on the development side.”

Ghost Recon: Future Soldier includes a Kinect-powered feature called Gunsmith, which allows players to customise weapons using gestures, but Lacey is clear that this is an addendum to the core experience, calling it “effectively a toy – something that’s fun”.

“We’ve also ensured that we don’t forget that something like Gunsmith is a mere step. The controller is still very important to the core experience, which is why you do everything else in the game with it,” he added.

Ghost Recon: Future Soldier arrives on PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360 in May, with a surprise PC version to follow. Check out an interview feature discussing the game’s delay and platform hopping.

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