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Mass Effect 2 looks like it runs rather well on a netbook when using Gaikai

Thursday, 2nd December 2010 19:55 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

gaikai

Want to know how Gaikai works or how it will run a game like Mass Effect 2 on a netbook with a “single core Atom CPU”?

Engadget has you covered.

Below, you’ll see how the game runs on the netbook used for the Gaikai beta. It looks fine to us, honestly.

That’s not all either. Engadget also has loads of information on how Gaikai’s servers work and how publishers can determine how much latency “makes for an acceptable session on a per-game basis” based on your internet connection speed.

It confused us a bit, but many things do, so just take our word for it and read up on it yourself.

Currently in open beta, Gaikai is slated for a mid-December release.

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26 Comments

  1. Patrick Garratt

    That’s pretty fucking cool.

    #1 4 years ago
  2. CroMagnon

    Looks like cloud based gaming has two major contenders. Except that Gaikai actually looks as expected here while OnLive only push fancy pre-rendered videos.

    I know which one I’d trust.

    #2 4 years ago
  3. OlderGamer

    Why not Onlive does the same type of thing and works great too.

    Now it comes down to price point and game selection.

    I know that Onlive is moving to a 10usd/month flat fee for unlimited play on what seems like all but brand new games.

    Ball is in your court Gaikai.

    #3 4 years ago
  4. OlderGamer

    @2 What are you talking about? I use Onlive, the games run fast and smooth, in full graphic glory. My guess is that if you can’t fully run Onlive, you will have the same trouble with Gaikai, because it is likly your isp and not the services themself.

    #4 4 years ago
  5. Erthazus

    Always connected to the internet is the bad idea

    + i see lags and not the best performance.

    If i want lags and not the best performance of the game the best way to go with consoles for now. They don’t require nothing.

    If you want better visuals and don’t want to be connected to the internet by playing singleplayer then standard PC is the best choice.

    Onlive and Gaikai have chance after 10 years maybe when internet will be better and performance will be better.

    Nothing amazing here for now.

    WOW, Gaikai runs Mass Effect 2. Such an achievement. You can’t run it on your PC or what?

    Let them run CRYSIS 1, CRYSIS 2 or ARMA 2 or RAGE on max graphics. Or Battlefield:BC 2, Black Ops without lags.

    #5 4 years ago
  6. onlineatron

    Cloud-based gaming is the future for sure.

    I’m all for it as long as publishers don’t use it as an excuse to screw us on price.

    If the cloud is to really take off pricing needs to be handled in a similar way as Steam. Standard prices at launch but relatively frequent sales.

    #6 4 years ago
  7. theevilaires

    Cool but I don’t care I’m playing it for PS3 :D

    #7 4 years ago
  8. Erthazus

    “single core Atom CPU”

    Thats not an achievement considering my sister playing Mass Effect 2 on the single 3.0 GHZ CPU having Geforce 9600 GT that is cheap and playing it at the same quality (if not better) and without lags.

    Nothing impressive there. Absolutely nothing.

    #8 4 years ago
  9. Stephany Nunneley

    @8 Nothing wrong at all with an NVIDIA Geforce 9600 GT.

    /pats her other PC tower lovingly

    #9 4 years ago
  10. OlderGamer

    You almost sound scared of Cloud Erth. Has it harmed you in some way? ;)

    Ok lets look at Tea for a sec. That man is on the go alot. ALOT. If he can have a game service that costs about the same price as renting one game(Onlive is putting a 10usd/flat fee into place), and he can play those games in a hotel room on a tiny(easy to travel with) work laptop/notebook/netbook, why shouldn’t he?

    I can think of many reasons that something like this would be apealing. Not like he can fit his Desktop or his PS3 in his carry on bag when he travels. Sure he could take a PSP, but he couldn’t play fullblown console/PC games on that either.

    No one is replacing your PC or stealing it. But if someday no one needs high end game rigs to play games … how is that a bad thing?

    I’d like to dream and say that maybe someday all games will be multiplat and none exclusive and 100% playable from a wide range of things from a iPad/iTouch to desktop to a microconsole to a netbook. Opens games up and should drive down costs because it would effectivly release the death grip certian companies have on the industry right now.

    if nothing else it would end the stupid console fanboy crap that plaques us all.

    #10 4 years ago
  11. AHA-Lambda

    @9 – exactly!

    *pats 9600GT SLI pc tower*

    #11 4 years ago
  12. Erthazus

    @10 People like portable devices because they like to carry something small in their pockets.

    thats one of the reasons why DS succeed while PSP being sold for 62 million units that is not bad.

    Look, when you are on the go you want to play with something and be done with it. Thats where DS, iOS device games did right and PSP didn’t.

    LapTop on the go? well, you have a point about a Hotel room thing. Thats ok if Gaikai can support 1080p and good framerates, but again… Without decent internet you won’t play games with good framerate.
    + you still need to carry controller or mouse with you.
    Still PSP or iOS, DS devices is a better choice.

    It’s still too far for this thing. Gaikai and Onlive are not ready for now. Just not ready.

    “You almost sound scared of Cloud Erth. Has it harmed you in some way?”

    You are absolutely right. You are a smart man and you know why i’m scared?

    Because platform will not be open. We need less services like that. What i don’t like while playing my games on the 360|Ps3 is that i feel like i’m being watched by some company. You are restricted to a lot of functions on your PS3 or 360, while on PC when it is open platform you can do with your game what you want. Mods, no stupid security systems and etc. You can upgrade your videocard if you want. Basically you have choices.
    + service always will want some additional cash from you. Some small little 10 bucks a month or another shitty thing.

    For now STEAM does everything right. When i play game on Steam i feel myself that i can do with my game what i want.
    If someone wants to make that service… Steam dev team must do it.

    I’m sure you like Civilization 5. I’m sure you wanted something more from this game and maybe looked at the internet and searched for some good mods for it. Or community, or something.
    With services like GAIKAI or OnLive it’s going to be less freedom. + there are already… a lot of services… Gaikai, Steam, OnLive, D2D, Stupid Ubisoft system, GFWL, GOG, Battle.net.

    Seriously enough…

    #12 4 years ago
  13. theevilaires

    @11 – exactly!

    * Pats NVIDIA RSX PS3 tower * ;)

    #13 4 years ago
  14. spiderLAW

    I llloovvveee my Nvidia RSX pc. Such a wonderful machine.

    #14 4 years ago
  15. DSB

    If cloud gaming could iron out the kinks, that would be a huge boon to the PC market. Possibly even comparable to Steam.

    The real question is how much money the licences can throw back on one of those services. Or rather the margins those licences throw off.

    It would suck if a huge rise in cloud gaming lead to cheaper, less cared for games, designed for the PC “rabble” so to speak.

    @5 Let the average PC player run “CRYSIS 1, CRYSIS 2 or ARMA 2 or RAGE on max graphics. Or Battlefield:BC 2, Black Ops without lags” – Spoiler alert: They can’t, because they’re still on a dual or single core machine by a margin of 7 to 3 against the minority of quadcore gamers.

    If you could actually offer those games to 100% of the PC market (or rather a vendor that enables 100% of the PC market to play them) that would be one of the best things to happen to PC gaming since the 90′s.

    Let’s face it, hardware manufacturers have done more to kill PC gaming than pirates could ever dream of. Here’s a potential bandage for that injury.

    #15 4 years ago
  16. Erthazus

    “Or Battlefield:BC 2, Black Ops without lags” – Spoiler alert: They can’t, because they’re still on a dual or single core machine by a margin of 7 to 3 against the minority of quadcore gamers.”

    these games don’t require super hardware. (except Crysis 1, Crysis 2, Arma 2. Yeah, here you are right.)

    Ok. Battlefield:BC2 require a lot, but COD for example can run pretty fast on the outdated 8600-8800 GT without a freakin problem with a single CPU.

    But how about… Buying yourself a 9600 GT and you can play COD and most of the games on that hardware and be satisfied with this?

    Or for sake… just CONSOLE is not enough? Soon we will see next generation.

    “Let’s face it, hardware manufacturers have done more to kill PC gaming than pirates could ever dream of. Here’s a potential bandage for that injury.”

    I don’t agree here. No one asks you to buy SLI 580 GTX with I7 970x and 12 GB Ram RIGHT NOW to play Call Of Duty.
    While pirates finish of the sales for some games. Look each year for the graph where are statistics about how much people downloaded Call Of duty. you will be so surprised with that number.

    Onlive or Gaikai btw can fix that problem. Thats maybe the only GOOD thing for the PC market. Because that thing can destroy pirates by delivering game from their own system, so PC will have better games this time around.

    + i’m sure for 90% that people won’t use single CPU for serious gaming. STEAM stats are not ridiculous, i’m just not sure that everyone of them play Assasins Creed or Battlefield:BC2. Games like Plants vs zombies? Ok.
    You still need a good LapTop that can run something else with good quality.

    I just don’t see this thing as a game changer. So far no one wants it. I mean really almost no one. Everyone see it as a cool technology.

    #16 4 years ago
  17. Moonwalker1982

    Oh but this is not really that new.

    This Netbook from Asus…i forgot the exact model, runs ME2 perfectly. For a netbook ridiculously impressive.

    #17 4 years ago
  18. DSB

    @16 Yeah, no it can’t.

    I’m stuck in the US at the moment, with a silly little dualcore laptop that has no chance of playing it, but I did have the chance to try it out on a dualcore “gaming rig from yesteryear” – And it was lagging all over the place. It was completely unplayable on the very lowest settings on Veteran.

    So, we busted that myth.

    Not that my argument was those specific games that you keep going on about, but merely the fact that most modern PC games won’t run very well on the level of hardware that’s available in peoples homes, and certainly not near the optimal.

    The PC currently demands updated hardware for a proper experience. Fact-of-life. You might wait one year, you might wait two, you might wait three but you’re going to have to upgrade to keep up – A cloud service will flatten those requirements out and allow people not to worry about that, which is exactly the same device that made most people jump to consoles in the first place.

    You might not care because you’re living in some kind of bubble where everybody’s got a quadcore and a 1GB graphics card (Which couldn’t be further from the truth – Again 30-35%) – but the fact is that the graphical splendor and the technical genius of most games isn’t available to 70% of the PC market.

    That’s not even mentioning the fact that less people will be likely to pirate games if all they have to do is buy a subscription (a la Netflix) to play games. Why would I want to download a season of Dexter on a lousy torrent when I can just stream it for no added cost?

    I’m not sure cloud gaming are offering those kinds of subs right now, but I’d be surprised if no one made the attempt. As you can tell just from this comment section, it certainly appeals to a lot of people already.

    #18 4 years ago
  19. freedoms_stain

    Have any of you read the Gaikai business model?

    It’s GENIUS.

    Basically they’re pushing it less as a full-on cloud gaming service and more of a “try before you buy” demo service.

    Basically you’ll visit the games web page (or even VG247, IGN, EuroGamer, pretty much any website advertising the game) and if you’ve got the bandwidth you’ll be offered a free trial period of the game.

    The FULL game, from the start for x amount of time. It doesn’t cost the devs/pubs any time or money in creating a unique demo, they just provide Gaikai the full game and they cut your trial off once you’ve played the allotted time. After that they link you up to partner websites where you can buy the full game, or you can pay Gaikai for a license to keep playing the game over the cloud.

    You don’t have to wait for anything to download, you just start playing, right in your browser. It won’t do anything for megaton hits like CoD, but for the smaller games where people are wary of punting their cash on unknown quantities, the ability to cheaply provide the actual full game experience could generate some serious sales.

    “I like the idea but not sure if I’ll like the game” Gaikai it bitch.

    #19 4 years ago
  20. Erthazus

    “I’m stuck in the US at the moment, with a silly little dualcore laptop that has no chance of playing it, but I did have the chance to try it out on a dualcore “gaming rig from yesteryear””

    It depends not on cores, it depends on the GHZ and speed. Dual core is not impressive until i will hear numbers of it’s MB cash, speed and GHZ.

    Because Intel Core i7-875 2.93 worse then Quad core S775 Q9650 for example.

    I can buy for todays standard 1 core CPU that will do a much better job then some Dual core models. + overclocking.

    Not to mention about videocard and RAM. CPU is not that important in PC games, compared to a good videocard.

    “The PC demands updated hardware. Fact-of-life. You might wait one year, you might wait two, you might wait three but you’re going to have to upgrade to keep up”

    BS. I didn’t upgraded my second PC for two years and it’s old already and have Quad Core CPU Q9550 and 4 GB Ram with Geforce 9800 GT 1 GB.
    Nothing needs to be changed. I can even play ARMA 2 on mid-high settings.
    But if i will overclock it i can use it for 2 years more if i want to play on max.

    You don’t need to upgrade every freakin year except if you want every freakin pixel on max. graphics settings.
    This generation of 360 and Ps3 my old second PC can live to the end and don’t need an upgrade at all.

    @freedoms_stain, Not a bad idea using it with that business model

    #20 4 years ago
  21. Crysis

    @Erthazus, the fact is you spent hundreds on something that’ll only last 4 years, then you will spend hundreds more to get a new top of the line rig, these cloud service eliminate that cycle completely, but it’ll be 15-20 years before it becomes big in the rest of the world, hopefully new service like this will halt Australia’s net providers from capping us, it’s ridiculous! we’re in the 21t century now.

    #21 4 years ago
  22. Michael O’Connor

    Cloud gaming is nice, and it has some great uses for specific people in specific circumstances. But it’s not the future, and it never will be. Not unless someone finds a magically way to eliminate lag. Which is impossible.

    It’s a nice concept, and I have nothing against it personally, but it’s not that future.

    #22 4 years ago
  23. Crysis

    @22, you can’t imagine a future where streaming HD video takes less than a millisecond? seems pretty short sighted, ofc it won’t be happening anytime soon for the common man, but we’ll get there, we’ll definately get there, give it some time.
    But for now, digital distribution is the now & future, i personally prefer physical game disks, but that’s just me & that won’t last forever…

    #23 4 years ago
  24. Freek

    But ofcourse computing power for home based devices doesn’t stand still either. So the question is will it still be relivant to use that streaming power for games in the future? Or will be it just as cheap to just run the game locally?
    Gaikai with it’s demo on the fly service nicely sidestepps the issue by still offering something of value: the power to try a game where ever and then decide how you want to buy it. A form of interactinve advertisement.

    OnLive on the other hand is trying to be the replacement of home computers and consoles, that’s allot more difficult.

    #24 4 years ago
  25. DSB

    @20 Denial is a terrible thing.

    The fact that you went quadcore early hardly means it’s going to be the same for everybody else, quite to the contrary. As the adoption rate clearly shows, most people haven’t.

    Clearly you can’t handle reality, so should we just leave it at that? I’ll take any bet you make against cloud gaming failing to generate massive profits within the next half decade.

    @22 Of course. It’s not “the” future, but it could very well play a big part in it. It won’t appeal to very many with a 30 percentile computer and a decent job with room for several higher end Steam purchases a month, but why would it need to? It just needs to catch the 70 percent with an outdated rig and a budget.

    The client is a gamer, he has little money to spare and his computer sucks. Gaikai comes along and offers him to pay 40 euro or dollars a month, roughly the price of one full game, for access to a library of more than 2000 streamed games.

    A lot of people would take that deal. You have massive populations in the eastern and southern part of Europe and big percentages in America to whom that would be extremely appealing.

    They might not get the perfect experience, but they’ll be playing modern PC games without having to get through either the hardware or the software paywall.

    #25 4 years ago
  26. OlderGamer

    “Cloud gaming is nice, and it has some great uses for specific people in specific circumstances. But it’s not the future, and it never will be. Not unless someone finds a magically way to eliminate lag. Which is impossible.

    It’s a nice concept, and I have nothing against it personally, but it’s not that future.”

    I dunno, I bet alot of people said the samething about Netflix and it’s instant streaming once upon a time.

    We all know how that turned out. And in a somewhat short period of time too.

    I am optimisticly watching these services, hoping for a better, cheaper, faster, and easier way for me to play games.

    #26 4 years ago

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