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US Senator proposes congress bill to research the impact of violent games

Thursday, 20th December 2012 13:00 GMT By Dave Cook

US Senator Jay Rockefeller has proposed a new bill to congress that – if passed- would task the National Academy of Sciences with thoroughly researching the impact of violent games and other violent media on the young minds. If passed, the bill could result in the largest study into the effects of violent games ever conducted.

On his website, Rockefeller said of the bill, “Major corporations, including the video game industry, make billions on marketing and selling violent content to children. They have a responsibility to protect our children. If they do not, you can count on the Congress to take a more aggressive role.”

If the bill is successful, the National Academy of Sciences will be expected to submit a report on its findings to Congress, along with the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission within 18 months.

Rockefeller’s bill follows a shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Connecticut, which has since raised new questions about the correlation between acts of violence, video games and other violent media.

The proposed research would look at the ties between exposing children to violent content, and their capacity for committing aggressive acts, damage themselves and to see if games have a different impact than say, violent movies. It aims to look at the far-reaching implications of said exposure beyond childhood and into adult life.

Rockefeller added in his statement, “With respect to violent video games, NAS must look at whether current or emerging aspects of games, like their interactive nature and the personal and vivid way violence is portrayed, have a unique impact on kids.

“Changes in technology now allow kids to access violent content online with less parental involvement. It is time for these two agencies to take a fresh look at these issues.”

What’s your take on the proposed study? VG247 offered up its own take of the events here.

Thanks Gamespot.

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59 Comments

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  1. KrazyKraut

    Oh…ofc…banning weapons would make some rich bastards poor…so better blame Games and Media for the lastest Newton shoot-out.

    #1 1 year ago
  2. The Auracle

    *sighs* Okay. This is the LAST time I’m going to break this idiotic, red-herring, fearmongering ass argument down.

    “Major corporations, including the video game industry, make billions on marketing and selling violent content to children.” – Actually, no they don’t sell every game directly to children. That’s a common misconception/over-exaggeration. Games like Skylanders is marketed directly to children, yes. Games like GTA? No. It never has and never will. Granted, some kids might find it appealing but that’s what the ESRB rating system in the States is for: to help parents make educated decisions. More on the parents role in just a moment.

    “They have a responsibility to protect our children.” – Oh? So what’s a parent supposed to do? Just allow them to play and watch everything and expect them to figure things out for themselves? Get real, Rockerfeller. A publisher and a developer’s role responsibility is to produce the content, not babysit and raise children.

    “Changes in technology now allow kids to access violent content online with less parental involvement. It is time for these two agencies to take a fresh look at these issues.” You mean after the introduction of parental controls on virtually EVERY software medium available? You mean after the introduction of game ratings? You mean after arming a parent with every single tool imaginable, you still advocate for them to have less involvement in what they watch and play? Well, that kind of exposes the real reason your campaigning for yet another study on top of the other countless studies already conducted.

    Oh, one more thing: isn’t the Sandy Hook perpetrator a 20-year-old man? The kids were the victims in the shooting, not the perpetrator. Ever since Columbine, the press has always tried to link a violent video game as the scapegoat for training and influence in their act. Give it a rest, already.

    #2 1 year ago
  3. Dave Cook

    @2 I hate to say this mate, but I agree with Rockefeller on most points, he’s just not putting his argument across all that well.

    When I grew up, games were all colourful, blocky and childish, so of course I might say ‘violent games make kids violent do they? what bullshit, I was a kid once, I used to play games.’

    Yeah that’s true, but the games kids are playing now are more realistic and more violent than the laughable Mortal Kombat I played back in the day. We’re from different generations, so who am I to say – without doing proper research – that violent games aren’t having some unseen impact on our kids?

    It could be true, the industry just hasn’t been around long enough for us to fully research the effect and to make a call on it.

    I don’t think any of us have all of the facts to make a blanket claim that violent games don’t impact kids, and I mean any of us.

    #3 1 year ago
  4. viralshag

    “Major corporations, including the video game industry, make billions on marketing and selling violent content to children. They have a responsibility to protect our children.”

    To be honest that’s what rating associations are for, to advise what is suitable and acceptable for certain ages to play. It’s the parents responsibility to step in and say “sorry, you’re not old enough to play/be sold this” and that goes for the retailers too if they’re slack on identifying the correct age.

    I don’t think 20 is that old, if anything you are a young adult, and yet he got hold of firearms.

    Games don’t kill people, guns do. Gamers don’t kill people, unstable people do.

    #4 1 year ago
  5. Moonwalker1982

    Oooh sure. And let’s not take a look at movies and tv shows at all, right? It’s up to the parents to make sure what their kids are doing in the first place.

    #5 1 year ago
  6. Dave Cook

    @5 we have looked at the impact of violent TV and movies before, many years ago. Games are newer, less research has been done. it’s something that must be researched, even if parents are to blame or not.

    #6 1 year ago
  7. viralshag

    @Dave, the industry may not be very old but school shootings aren’t exactly new.

    *I had to edit that to make sense. My bad.

    #7 1 year ago
  8. Moonwalker1982

    Yeah i guess so. As long as it won’t have any negative consequences for older gamers, like us, i’m good. Young minds shouldn’t even be able to touch a game like GTA V, Gears or worse.

    #8 1 year ago
  9. G1GAHURTZ

    No dev sets out to sell violent games to children.

    If they get their hands on them, it’s no different than when they get their hands on violent movies, literature, etc.

    Focusing on computer games is trying to shut the proverbial stable door here.

    Sure, violent games have an undoubted negative effect on many kids, but the problem is much, much, much deeper than that.

    However, it’s no surprise that so many people are blind to this.

    #9 1 year ago
  10. Dave Cook

    @9 “but the problem is much, much, much deeper than that”

    Correct. Which is why I think the guy isn’t explaining the subject well at all. I think his proposed study would go some way to exploring the wider issue – if it isn’t biased of course – but perhaps I’m too optimistic.

    #10 1 year ago
  11. Ireland Michael

    The only thing this bill will do is require the NAS to do some research into the subject.

    And they’ll come to the same conclusions they always come to. Violent video games have no impact on violent behavior. Most studies have shown the exact opposite – that it actually relaxes and de-stressed people.

    This is not something to get upset over. It’s doubtful it’ll even get looked at.

    @3 “Who am I to say – without doing proper research – that violent games aren’t having some unseen impact on our kids?”

    They don’t. The research has been done countless time. People are capable of detaching reality from fiction. People are either predisposed towards violence, or they’re not.

    Constantly exposing your child to violent media is obviously not going to be good for them, but that’s the responsibility of the parent, and is true of every single medium. Age ratings exists on everything anyway, so it’s a non-issue – the blame falls *squarely* on the parents if their kid is being exposed to this stuff.

    #11 1 year ago
  12. DeyDoDoughDontDeyDough

    So Dave. Because the graphics are better than when you were growing up, you put forward the case that YOU turned out fine, but that THEY (meaning other people who aren’t you, and on whose behalf you appear happy to speak) cannot tell the difference between a videogame and reality?

    Are you aware that political statements like those Rockerfeller has issued in the above statement are driven by lobbying on the religious right? You know the religious right, right? The ones that want to imprison homosexuals and so on.

    There are dozens of reports on this issue like this one: http://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/video-games/8798927/Violent-video-games-reduce-crime.html#

    All of them state a reduction in violent behaviour among gamers compared to non-gamers. Look them up. They have a calming effect.

    Should we ban masturbation? Think that’ll put an end to sex crime.

    I cannot tell you how much I detest the attitude that it’s ‘Okay for me, but other people are too stupid to know the difference between fantasy and reality’. What other people? Show me one. Have you ever met a single person in your entire lifetime as a gamer who thought anything they were doing in a game related to reality in any way at all? No.

    Humans are built to tell what’s real and what is not. That violent films, books and, later, games have existed for a century or more and in that time not one causal link has been established tells you everything you need to know.

    Think about that. REALLY think about it. A hundred trillian instances of human exposure to violent FICTIONAL material and NOT ONE proven link. Oh, but wait; the guy who killed John Lennon read Catcher In The Rye and Lee Harvey Oswald read Conflict: the history of the Korean War.

    What does it tell us? That Violent people, amazingly, read books, watch films and yes, they play games. Crazy.

    #12 1 year ago
  13. DrDamn

    @11
    “Constantly exposing your child to violent media is obviously not going to be good for them”

    So violent games do have an impact on kids or don’t? Because just above this you said they don’t.

    #13 1 year ago
  14. Dave Cook

    @8 well said. I think that’s the big deal-breaker isn’t it. if it stops me, a 29-year-old from playing adult games, then I’ll get my pitchfork out, but by all means we should be protecting kids.

    #14 1 year ago
  15. Dave Cook

    @12 I never said people were too stupid to not tell the difference, you’re kind of making it out like I said that ;)

    What I mean is, young kids now are being exposed to different violent material than I was when I was a kid. So who am I – personally – to say that that content isn’t impacting the kids in some way?

    I can’t, that’s why more research needs to be done. As for all the research that has been done before, they have been conducted with somewhere between 20-30 kids for like a week. You need a bigger test sample I think, that’s what I’m trying to – clumsily – say.

    #15 1 year ago
  16. expose the core

    Fuck the Rockefellers they were staunch supporters of eugenics in the 1930s, and poured vast amounts of money to the German “racial hygiene” programs etc… They even funded the work of Josef Mengele for fucks sake. They have absolutely no moral right to get on a high horse, and start pointing fingers.

    #16 1 year ago
  17. Dave Cook

    @16 bloody hell, that’s insane :/

    #17 1 year ago
  18. humanfish

    Completely agree with your sentiments Dave.
    To dimiss it and say that research shouldn’t be done is foolish.

    #18 1 year ago
  19. OrbitMonkey

    I think it’s more worrying that Dave is giving credence to these claims. Those politicians finally getting through to you with their guilt-tripping Dave?

    By the by, realistic looking violence scares children. Cartoony violence they find funny & are far more likely to imitate that.

    #19 1 year ago
  20. Ireland Michael

    @13 I said the simple existence of it isn’t going to affect someone.

    *Constant* exposure to nothing but violence and brutality and harm isn’t going to be good for any young developing mind, obviously, but no self respecting parent would do that to their child, and most don’t. I’m not talking solely about video games here though.

    If you’re letting your child constantly immerse themselves in nothing but violence (and I’ve seen parents who do) then you’re a bad parent. Whether its video games, telivision, images, videos, or simply the behavior of the people in their lives… it’s telling the child that this constantly violent stimuli is an acceptable way for one to live their life.

    #20 1 year ago
  21. Dave Cook

    @19 no of course not :P

    I’m just saying that we’re all too quick to dismiss the *possibility* that violent games don’t have an impact because we’re defending or cherished hobby. I defend games all the time whenever people say it’s childish or I should find something better to do.

    But I’m no psychologist, I haven’t done this research myself, so I can’t make the claim that violent games don’t have an impact. I’m just being open-minded about it.

    #21 1 year ago
  22. expose the core

    @17 http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rockefeller_Foundation

    Developed and funded various German eugenics programs, including the one that Josef Mengele worked in before he went to Auschwitz.[9][10]

    The Rockefeller Foundation, funded Nazi racial studies even after it was clear what this research was being used to rationalize the demonizing of Jews and other groups. Up until 1939 the Rockefeller Foundation was funding research used to support Nazi racial science studies at the Kaiser Wilhelm Institute of Anthropology, Human Heredity, and Eugenics (KWIA.) Reports submitted to Rockefeller did not hide what these studies were being used to justify, but Rockefeller continued the funding and refrained from criticizing this research so closely derived from Nazi ideology. The Rockefeller Foundation did not alert “the world to the nature of German science and the racist folly” that German anthropology promulgated and Rockefeller funded for years after the passage of the 1935 Nuremberg racial laws.[32]

    #22 1 year ago
  23. Dave Cook

    @22 Jesus. Was there ever a modern investigation into this? Someone should do an expose on it.

    #23 1 year ago
  24. OrbitMonkey

    @21, I’m not defending my hobby, I’m attacking a stupid notion, by a headline grabbing politician, that seems to have the backing of a moronic media.

    The world is awash with violent media, including in-depth stories of horrific crime, reported in the same tabloids that all seem content to blame it all on videogames…

    It’s just stupid people looking for simple reasons, without having to make hard decisions.

    #24 1 year ago
  25. Ireland Michael

    @21 Crime rates, homicide rates, and the rates of numerous other violent actives have been plummeting in the US over the last decade. Meanwhile, the current generation of young people (teenagers and young adults) are more open minded, more cultured, and more informed than my generation ever was.

    So the way I see it, it clearly isn’t having any negative effect on society, despite it being one of the most popular pastimes in the world.

    #25 1 year ago
  26. Mike W

    But don’t we have the ERSB rating system in place to seperate what is meant for a child vs what is meant for an adult? If a parent buys their 7 year old child a game with a mature rating on it and then is shock how much violence there is in the game, then shame on the parent.

    Congress has to realize when someone commits an unspeakable crime (like the tradegy that happened in CT) that the person that did it, should be held responsible, not movies, games or any of sort of entertainment that the person was into.

    #26 1 year ago
  27. OrbitMonkey

    @23, Why? Back then eugenics was considered a bona fida science. By everyone. It’s the Nazi’s who made everyone realise that maybe it’s a pile of shit.

    #27 1 year ago
  28. viralshag

    Why aren’t the firearm companies that make (probably) billions questioned as to why guns make it into the hands of “regular” people who would do something like this?

    @Dave, I don’t think people are throwing the idea out that games have nothing to do with it, more that there seems to be much clearer issues at hand such as questionable parenting, accessibility of firearms, recognition of mentally unstable and/or dangerous people, etc.

    #28 1 year ago
  29. Da Man

    Violent videogames don’t affect kids, they ‘re art and entertainment, playing videogames is a hobby and quick scope doesn’t dumb down fps games.

    True story.

    #29 1 year ago
  30. YoungZer0

    http://youtu.be/CH5iXWu6AKg

    Meanwhile US senators are confused over the fact that videogames exist in Europe and Canada and produce no mass shootings.

    Scapegoating Bullshit.

    #30 1 year ago
  31. DeyDoDoughDontDeyDough

    “I’m just saying that we’re all too quick to dismiss the *possibility* that violent games don’t have an impact because we’re defending or cherished hobby.”

    I was actually defending common sense, but it appears there’s none here to defend. Onward.

    #31 1 year ago
  32. Dave Cook

    @31 Right…:/

    #32 1 year ago
  33. Phoenixblight

    I don’t support this. Research needs to be done with unbiased study and not be funded by people that will probably have a biased view.

    #33 1 year ago
  34. xXNapsterManXx

    Dat last name

    #34 1 year ago
  35. OrbitMonkey

    @31, You didn’t choose the smug life, smug life chose you :-/

    Common sense? It’s a politician scapegoating, again. But by all means buy into their illogical logic, if it helps.

    #35 1 year ago
  36. Clupula

    This is exactly the same waste of tax dollars smokescreen that Al Gore did in the 80′s with metal and punk music. It’s disgusting that with all the problems we have in America, we are wasting money on this absolute bullshit. There’s a problem, so let’s blame the media. Let’s not look at the billions of dollars cut in mental health services. Let’s not look at the fact that you can just waltz into Wal-Mart and buy a gun without any sort of waiting list in many states.

    No, of course, it has to be videogames. As an American, this makes me absolutely ashamed of my country.

    #36 1 year ago
  37. YoungZer0

    @36: Don’t be ashamed, politicians are the same in every country. Always looking for a scapegoat. As long as the videogame industry doesn’t pay them, it will remain the scapegoat.

    #37 1 year ago
  38. Clupula

    @19 – I agree. I am very bothered by Dave’s attitude towards this.

    #38 1 year ago
  39. Dave Cook

    @38 I’m not agreeing outwardly with the way Rockefeller himself is proposing we handle the issue in this single instance. I’m saying that – in general terms – more research should be done. I’m doing a clumsy job of saying it, as usual.

    You can relax now folk, I haven’t sided with the maniacal politician in this instance ;)

    #39 1 year ago
  40. Ireland Michael

    You people are giving Dave way too much shit about this.

    He was just opening the subject for questioning. Calm your nuts.

    Even if you don’t agree, learn some goddamn respect. There’s no need to be a jerk about it. Otherwise you’re just kinda helping to prove arguments linking gaming to anti-social behavior correct.

    #40 1 year ago
  41. Dave Cook

    @40 they are, thank you mate.

    It sort of proves the point I was trying to make in my opinion blog on Tuesday, the one about gamers being quick to defend the hobby with acid-tipped, nasty replies rather than actually taking time to considering the wider issues, and the possibility that maybe, just maybe games do have a negative effect.

    I’m not saying they do have a negative effect, I’m just saying, at the age of about 30+, gaming still isn’t old enough for us to properly see the long-lasting impact.

    Stack that against centuries of music, and many, many decades of film, then you can see that gaming is still just an infant itself. We’re still figuring things out, the way it works and yes – whether you like it or not – the way it influences us as people.

    I’m not being vicious towards games, why would I? I’ve been playing them since I was seven myself.

    Think we all need to relax a bit here.

    #41 1 year ago
  42. Clupula

    Dave, you know I like you. I think it’s awesome that you come on here and talk among us. So, I’m going to try to be as civil as I can when I try to explain why this touches such a raw nerve with me. First off, there have been a bunch of different studies, some of which you guys have posted on your site, numerous times. Most of which say that the opposite is true of what the Senator is claiming.

    However, I see you coming into it as an outsider to American politics. I, on the other hand, grew up with the fucking Meese Commission tapping my family’s phone and setting up sting operations to arrest his colleagues, because he created entertainment that the government saw as morally objectionable. I’ve seen this happen time and time again. My father told me about how in the 70′s, they went after the porn industry. In the 80′s, they wasted taxpayer money to go after metal musicians. Take some time to Youtube Dee Snider and Frank Zappa being brought in to testify in front of the senate.

    In the 90′s, they made a big deal out of the evils of rap music and Al Gore, who had previously been in charge of those 80′s hearings, started saying things like, “Hollywood has six months to clean up their act once I become president or I’ll start passing legislation to force them to do so.” This is part of why so many of us voted for Ralph Nader in 2000 and, as shitty as Bush was, I would prefer him to Al Gore any day.

    Now, it’s videogames they’re going after. And all of this is usually the forefront of an attempt to control content. They will argue that mandatory ratings are not enough. That the industry is doing a poor job of regulating itself. And that more needs to be done to keep this out of the hands of children.

    And none of this will happen in a vacuum and the money that comes out of my paychecks will be used towards this bullshit. So, I hope you understand why I am filled with rage at this.

    You say that things were bright and colorful in your youth, but now they’re more adult, so maybe they are effecting people. That’s the exact same argument Tipper Gore used against music in the 80′s in her book, “Raising PG Kids in an X-Rated Society.” The same book where, at the back, she encourages parents to send their kids to, and I’m not kidding you, these really existed, Metal and Punk Deprogramming Centers.

    Meanwhile, here we are, how many years later, and I have friends who are respected professionals, one of which legally represents the governor of New Jersey, who owns an album with the song, “Meathook Sodomy” on it (my lawyer friend, I mean. The Governor of New Jersey is a big Springsteen fan). Certainly didn’t make him any less able to function as a human being and certainly didn’t make him shoot up a school.

    THAT is what this sort of bullshit leads to.

    We cut $4.3 billion in mental health care LAST YEAR ALONE, yet we want to spend money on this bullshit? This is why it fills me with rage when it appears you are saying that there’s something to what the senator says, besides political scapegoating and repeating a cycle that does nothing but destroy the lives of creative people.

    #42 1 year ago
  43. YoungZer0

    We always had this, you know. Books were evil, films were evil, rockmusic was evil, metal was evil, The fucking Beatles were evil and now videogames.

    It’s the same shit every fucking time. Old people don’t understand it, so they want it gone. “Dems Mass Effects made him kill dem Kids!”

    The whole world consumes videogames, even violent videogames. One mentally disturbed person gets his hands on weapons and starts killing innocent people. Now some old fart tells us that videogames are bad and we should feel bad.

    It’s stupid, a huge waste of time and money, a lazy scapegoat tactic, because they will never talk about the real problem: Poor gun regulations. There is a reason why the Brady Campaign gave Obama a F-Grade for his (lack of) Gun Control.

    You know, around the same time, some fucker in China ran around stabbing school children with his knife. He was stopped and although 20 kids were injured, none of them died.

    There was talk about videogames being responsible for the killing of the 28 people before people even knew how many he killed. It’s the same old shit and i’m not buying it. Please do yourself a favor and watch the video i mentioned in comment #30, and read the video description, because there ARE studies out there who prove shit eaters like Rockefeller wrong.

    #43 1 year ago
  44. Clupula

    The quote above is the most important part, “Major corporations, including the video game industry, make billions on marketing and selling violent content to children. They have a responsibility to protect our children. If they do not, you can count on the Congress to take a more aggressive role.

    This is the beginning of game developers being treated like criminals if they make something some soccer mom in Peoria thinks is objectionable. Ask Jello Biafra what it’s like to have your home raided like you’re a drug kingpin, because someone says a poster for your band is pornographic.

    #44 1 year ago
  45. freedoms_stain

    I think we need some definitions of what “violent” games are here.

    I’m almost certain that a lot of the politicians sounding off on this subject have a very differing view on what constitutes violent gameplay and what does not. I’m also pretty sure their collective knowledge on the industry at large is extremely poor.

    Furthermore, the industry already has rating systems that are supposed to protect children from inappropriate content, it falls on retailers to ensure such content is not sold to children and to parents not to provide it.

    Things get a little bit murkier when it comes to PC’s, but you can make sure your child doesn’t have administrator rights on any computers they have access to (therefore they can’t install pirated games or F2P games of an inappropriate nature or indeed any software without an administrator/parent’s approval). I don’t know how good web filtering is these days for kids.

    #45 1 year ago
  46. YoungZer0

    @44: Sounds like absolute blackmail to me. “You make a shit ton of money, where is our share?”

    #46 1 year ago
  47. Clupula

    @45 – You’re very right about the definitions and what a place of ignorance they are coming from. Keep in mind a few days ago, Dynasty Warriors was referred to as “shockingly violent.”

    #47 1 year ago
  48. blackdreamhunk

    It’s not going to happen why because gaming Industry is worth a lot of money. They would not want people to lose tons of jobs.

    #48 1 year ago
  49. _LarZen_

    Im a gamer and I hope this bill passes!

    Regardless if children get effected by adult games I hope there will be a Law that forbids selling adult games to children.

    Children have nothing to do in games like COD, it’s made for adults.

    I alsow hope they will document once and for all if violent games is bad for normal People. You dont have to be a genius to understand that unbalanced People should not play violent games.

    That said one dont have to be a genius to know that the gun Law in the US is out of controll.

    #49 1 year ago
  50. Zohar

    I won’t flat out say that violent video games don’t effect children at all. Let’s have an unbiased study and see what happens. I’m not a psychologist, so lets let them do their study and see what happens. (assuming it’s unbiased and totally fair, which there’s a fat chance in hell that it will, or at least won’t be presented fairly when it’s all said and done. They obviously have their political objective.)

    Here are some things I do know:

    Bills don’t materialize out of thin air in a matter of days. This thing has been sitting in his desk drawer waiting to be sprung. “never let a serious crisis go to waste” is an oft-quoted line from a prominent politician named Rahm Emmanuel which I think applies here. Video game regulation has been on the back burner with certain politicians for years. Joe Lieberman, to name one.

    The ESA, ESRB, publishers and developers absolutely -do not- have a responsibility to protect children. That is 100% the responsibility of parents.

    Publishers do not market violent games to children. That claim is a complete ass-pull.

    Parents are responsible for deciding what games their underage children play. Period.

    Adam Lanza was a mentally and emotionally disturbed individual from a broken home who, if the reports are to be believed, found out his mother was about to commit him to a mental facility. He didn’t learn how to shoot guns in a video game, he learned how to shoot guns when his mother took him to shooting ranges and -trained- him how to shoot REAL guns. He had a psychotic breakdown, stole his mother’s guns, and went on a rampage.

    Videogames shouldn’t even be part of this discussion. It’s an insult to the victims and their families to try and cloud the issue with this peripheral bullshit. That applies to both ends of the political spectrum, where I’ve seen the pundits regurgitating phrases like “murder simulator” while possessing complete ignorance of what videogames are, have been, and can be.

    #50 1 year ago
  51. YoungZer0

    @49: “Regardless if children get effected by adult games I hope there will be a Law that forbids selling adult games to children.” Isn’t there one already?

    #51 1 year ago
  52. DeyDoDoughDontDeyDough

    Everything Clupula said.

    #52 1 year ago
  53. Cobra951

    Yes, there is.

    A study? Oh, good. Then by the time it actually happens, people won’t be as focused on blaming the wrong things as they are now, unless of course there’s another big school shooting around that time. Memories are intense, but so short. I’ll take a study over knee-jerk legislation any day, and take my chances with the results, and their timing.

    #53 1 year ago
  54. DSB

    @45 If you really wanted to get serious about legislating, you could always hold parents accountable for their children accessing that content on their computers, while they’re in their custody.

    Since parents are most often directly responsible for buying that content for their kids, you’d actually be targeting a responsible party, even if it’s still virtually unenforceable.

    But let’s not kid ourselves that it’s actually about keeping kids safe, it’s about impressing their parents with another round of base fear mongering, reassuring the parents that nothing is their fault, and that it’s all the big bad industry trying to poison their undoubtedly stellar efforts.

    #54 1 year ago
  55. Da Man

    I hope they restrict the sales just to make overgrown nerds who get a boner from playing video games for 12 year olds type even more walls of deluded bla bla bla.

    You have to wonder what kind of backwards and/or deprived person thinks pressing buttons on a gamepad is in any way related to visiting a concert.

    Probably the same kind of person who ‘s that desperate to make his life more exciting as to fight for companies selling him software because apparently those companies ‘express themselves’.. which apparently leads to the person pressing buttons also expressing himself.

    Oh well, at least folks have something to do with their time.

    Anyway, looking forward.. Perhaps more developers will start making videogames instead of qte demos too.

    #55 1 year ago
  56. Christopher Jack

    @55, For someone who claims they only have enough time for a game session or 2 per week, you seem to have no issues being on this site for hours frothing your normal bs.

    #56 1 year ago
  57. Da Man

    Yes I do, dude. Sometimes I have hours for you and your inane angst, it’s when I have to be in messenger but don’t really have to do anything time consuming.

    For some odd reason I’m still less online than most of these guys.

    Now tell me more about art and governments.

    There’s nothing bs about pointing out inadequacy.

    #57 1 year ago
  58. Ireland Michael

    @56 Stop giving him more incentive to keep trolling.

    #58 1 year ago
  59. Da Man

    ^The irony..

    For an attention seeking, internet dwelling person who enjoys posting deliberately pseudo-original remarks to get a pseudo-discussion which is basically who copy pastes the better, you sure do lack it, Lolconner.

    #59 1 year ago