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Clouded vision: what Sony will do with Gaikai

Monday, 2nd July 2012 11:09 GMT By Rob Fahey

Rob Fahey makes sense of Sony’s Gaikai buy. Streaming is only part of PlayStation’s future, but it’s going to be a vital one which leverages an enviable back catalogue across multiple devices. Question is, who’s going to buy OnLive?

The Gaikai vision, which I suspect is shared at Sony, is of cloud gaming as a supplement to the gaming you do already. It’s not going to replace a next-generation PlayStation packed with custom hardware and aimed at providing the ultimate console gaming experience from games distributed digitally or on Blu-Ray discs.

Sony, it’s fair to say, isn’t exactly in rude financial health right now. It just posted the worst financial results in its history, and its new boss, Kaz Hirai (he of PlayStation fame), faces the unenviable task of turning around a slow-moving company that’s hemorrhaging cash. Yet today, the company finally confirmed what VG247 reported ahead of E3 – it’s bought cloud gaming platform Gaikai, dropping $380 million on the firm and further swelling the bank account of its founder, Dave “He Made Earthworm Jim, By The Way” Perry.

What does that tell you? It tells you that Sony really, really wanted Gaikai – enough to splash out cash even when cash is causing such headaches. While the rest of us accept that cloud gaming is going to be a part of the medium’s future at some point down the line, Sony wants to be involved as quickly as possible. Whatever the company has planned for the future of the PlayStation line-up, cloud gaming is obviously going to be a big part of the equation.

Gaikai’s technology is pretty good. Unlike his rivals at OnLive, Perry has always been careful to downplay where cloud gaming is right now – he doesn’t trumpet it as a way to replace consoles or gaming PCs, but rather as a way to deliver gaming in new ways and to new devices. Gaikai runs in a browser, without needing any dedicated hardware or software, and it’s perfect for things like running fully functional game demos on websites, or logging in to an MMO from a tablet device that’s not powerful enough to run the actual game client. You can play full games on it too, of course, but Gaikai shies away from the dubious claims of lag-free, crystal-clear HD perfection with which OnLive has become associated.

That probably tells you something about how Sony views cloud gaming. The Gaikai vision, which I suspect is shared at Sony, is of cloud gaming as a supplement to the gaming you do already. It’s not going to replace a next-generation PlayStation packed with custom hardware and aimed at providing the ultimate console gaming experience from games distributed digitally or on Blu-Ray discs – instead, it’s going to give you extra gaming options on a variety of different devices.

The bombastic rhetoric about cloud gaming being The Future (which it might be, but it’s a future several console generations away) has always glossed over the problems with such a system, but those problems become a cold hard reality once a console platform holder buys up the cloud gaming platform. (That’s always been the exit plan for both Gaikai and OnLive, I’m certain – neither of them really expected to survive as independent companies.) You talk a great game while you’re trying to attract a bidder to come and buy your company, but reality settles in afterwards.

The reality is one we’re all familiar with as gamers. Internet connections aren’t reliable. Sometimes they lag for a few minutes while the people next door microwave their miserable ready-meal dinner. Sometimes you move into a flat that for no comprehensible reason can’t get better than 512kbps ADSL. Sometimes your phone cable is severed by road works and doesn’t get fixed for days. Sometimes your flatmate denies vehemently that he’s downloading anything while your Netflix stream stutters and fails, and his secretly BitTorrented collection of goat porn grows ever larger. Sometimes you’re simply not in a place that has a net connection at all. In all of these scenarios, streaming-based cloud gaming services will fail you utterly. If your entire gaming system relies on the cloud, then you don’t get to play games unless your net connection is in perfect condition.

That’s a reality which cloud gaming platforms tend to gloss over – if they address it at all, they use platitudes about how it’s a minority of users who encounter such problems, or how net connections are getting better all the time. Both of those things are true, but they’re also meaningless. If you’re Sony or Microsoft, or any other publisher or platform holder, you want to know exact numbers. If 10% of your customers, for example, are going to hit regular, persistent problems with cloud gaming, then that means between 6-10 million people for whom your service is worthless – a nightmare scenario that makes Blizzard’s Diablo 3 woes look like teatime in fairyland. Is either Sony or Microsoft about to ditch six to ten million customers because their net connection isn’t up to scratch? No, they’re not.

Sony wanted to stop anyone else from buying Gaikai, and you can be sure that as well as Samsung, Perry was talking to plenty of other firms Sony considers to be rivals. That begs the next question – now that the acquisition party has started, who’s going to buy OnLive?

So that’s what Sony won’t do next. Dispense with any ideas of the PS4 being a cheap streaming box delivering next-gen experiences from a science fiction datacentre. A move like that would set the cat among the pigeons, but it would be an old, lame, declawed and likely blind cat, and the pigeons would just look bemused.

What Sony will do next is arguably even more interesting, though – albeit less earthshakingly revolutionary. The company has had a few faltering starts in recent years at the idea of extending the PlayStation brand across new devices. We’ve had a PlayStation branded Xperia mobile phone, which was unfortunately rubbish, and the brand also wiggled onto Sony’s interesting (but also a bit rubbish) efforts at Android-powered tablet devices. Then there’s PlayStation Mobile, formerly PlayStation Suite, a system for delivering PlayStation content onto mobile phones – presently just Sony phones, but a deal with HTC was announced at E3. The idea, ultimately, is to get PlayStation content and the PlayStation Network onto as many devices as possible.

Gaikai is a major piece of that puzzle. Back at E3, the company announced a partnership with Samsung to integrate Gaikai technology into every Samsung television. Expect Sony to do much the same, but even more of it, with Gaikai technology creeping into Sony televisions, phones, laptops, tablets and, of course, consoles.

What will that technology do, once it’s there? It’ll provide access to one of the most enviable back catalogues of entertainment software out there. Sony and its publishing partners are sitting on 15 years worth of extraordinary games – the back catalogues of PlayStation, PS2, PSP and PS3 effectively cover the entire period in which gaming became a part of mainstream culture and include countless games that have defined and redefined our medium. Some of those have been made available on PSP and PS3 as emulated titles, but Gaikai offers the potential to vastly speed up the process of making this software available, to serve the games to a wider variety of devices, and moreover, to experiment with new pricing ideas. How about access to the PS1 content library as part of your PlayStation Plus subscription? A couple of pounds a month for the whole Sony back catalogue streamed to your phone or tablet? Neither of those may come to pass, of course, but the point is that Gaikai gives Sony flexibility and reach it could only dream of before.

There are ways this can work for new games, too. I like the idea of streaming a game demo rather than downloading a few gigabytes for a 20-minute long sample – sure, the quality may not be quite as good as the final game, but even non-technical consumers are surprisingly savvy about stuff like that. We’re all used to the idea that DVDs look better than YouTube, that Blu-Rays look better than DVDs; the concept that full games look better than streamed demos won’t be a stretch for people. There could even be a streaming option for full games – I just wouldn’t expect to see it replacing disc-based and download-based distribution any time in the next few years, at the very least.

That, I think, is how the Gaikai future will look. Not a replacement for your home console, but rather, more PlayStation in more places – an execution of a strategy that Sony’s been struggling to get its head around for the best part of a decade. Of course, there’s also one final reason why Sony bought Gaikai right now. It wanted to stop anyone else from doing it, and you can be sure that as well as Samsung, Gaikai was talking to plenty of other firms Sony considers to be rivals. That begs the next question – now that the acquisition party has started, who’s going to buy OnLive?

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53 Comments

  1. StolenGlory

    “That, I think, is how the Gaikai future will look. Not a replacement for your home console, but rather, more PlayStation in more places – an execution of a strategy that Sony’s been struggling to get its head around for the best part of a decade.”

    Brilliant bit of insight that and a great article.

    Can’t wait to see what comes of this.

    #1 2 years ago
  2. Erthazus

    “Question is, who’s going to buy OnLive?”

    EA, Microsoft.

    Only they can. EA have more reason because they like to buy every shit there is.

    #2 2 years ago
  3. kingofscotland

    Good article, and exactly what I think ‘an added option’ so if you don’t like streaming or threaten to ‘quit gaming if the future is streaming’ then simple answer is – Don’t

    This won’t take away anything we already have, just giving additional options and potential subscriptions.

    All options are welcome

    #3 2 years ago
  4. kingofscotland

    This also puts Onlive in a strong bargaining position with M$ or whoever as Gaikai are off the market now – so you pay us what we want or go it alone.

    But I think the main contender with M$ for Onlive will be Apple – then we’ll finally see Onlive on App store as well as Apple TV and integrated into their rumoured TV

    #4 2 years ago
  5. Ireland Michael

    This is going to be nothing more than another Sony misstep.

    #5 2 years ago
  6. Erthazus

    @5, Yeah. I agree.

    There is no reason for that. Cloud gaming is worthless currently in any shape of form. I won’t download even demos on my PC and i have Perfect Internet connection.

    Because GAIKAI is a piece of shit.

    #6 2 years ago
  7. CyberMarco

    @6 They have to start from somewhere… Nevertheless, we’ll wait and see how this will turn out!

    #7 2 years ago
  8. AHA-Lambda

    @5 – how? cloud gaming will be huge, this is one of the few times i’d say sony made a smart decision.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. G1GAHURTZ

    Unlike Sony, MS already has it’s own cloud infrastructure set up.

    You can pretty much use the full version of Microsoft Office from any web browser right now. And let’s not forget SkyDrive.

    They have no need to buy any company to do something for them that they already know how to do.

    #9 2 years ago
  10. Ireland Michael

    @8 Yeah… No, it won’t.

    It’s a convenient niche for those who feel a need for it, but that’s all it will ever be, and there are countless reasons why it will never take off in anti legitimately mainstream sense.

    - impossible to eliminateImput lag
    - Lack or visual clarity in graphics
    - No true ownership of content
    - Bandwidth sapping that ISPs would never be able to handle if it was used by everyone

    #10 2 years ago
  11. Erthazus

    @7, Start from where? Diablo III shows that always Online (even with perfect internet connection) is pain in the ass.

    It also gives the publishers almost total control over a game that you bought with your money.
    Service is down? Sorry, but you can’t play your single player game. Shutting down our servers? Well, now you have some useless data that you can’t do anything with anymore.
    Crappy visuals/low resolution and horrible frame rates with latency issues? Sorry, server issues and other premenstrual syndromes.

    Gaikai is horrible. I played Dead Space 2 and Mass Effect 2. It’s a horrible experience. I’m already not the biggest console fan, but at least it’s a solid 576i,570p,720p image with physical disc/digital media that works. that let you play your game when you want and where you want.

    GAIKAI is S T U P I D. Everything that is online is broken and closed. It’s a more closed environment than already closed Console environment.

    P.S. Fun fact. In Diablo III there is Auction House and Blizzard can turn off whenever they feel they need to do it.
    for example right now it’s Offline and you can’t do anything.

    It is right now at this moment!

    #11 2 years ago
  12. rrw

    @10

    for lag read this

    http://www.joystiq.com/2012/05/16/nvidias-grid-platform-hopes-to-dramatically-improve-cloud-gamin/

    #12 2 years ago
  13. CyberMarco

    @11 There is always room to make some improvements, don’t need to be so harsh. I agree that these systems have a lot of flaws today, but you can’t say they wont be fixed tomorrow.

    #13 2 years ago
  14. Erthazus

    @12, It will dramatically improve already horrible resolution and slow frame rates to a horrible resolution with less slow frame rates that won’t give a better result because GAMES every year look better!

    My 7 year old videocard from Nvidia will do a much better job. Thank You.

    @CyberMarco, “There is always room to make some improvements”

    Yeah, right now for example. I’m playing Diablo III right now and Auction House is offline because you know why? Because publisher decided to turn it off. THAT you can’t improve.
    You can’t improve something if publisher wants to turn off and etc.

    #14 2 years ago
  15. rrw

    @14 obviously this is not for you that want every single human nose detail while playing max payne 4

    but for “normal” person. playing 360p 20fps crysis on the phone is awesome. hence cloud gaming exist

    #15 2 years ago
  16. Erthazus

    “but for “normal” person. playing 360p 20fps crysis on the phone is awesome. hence cloud gaming exist”

    Yeah, you re right. Next great step will be when EA announces Battlefield 4 exclusively on iOS and android devices as an AAA title and etc.

    Normal person can fuck off really because he is satisfied with Angry Birds that does not REQUIRE internet connection or Streaming, you know that?

    #16 2 years ago
  17. Ireland Michael

    Cloud gaming is the ultimate form of DRM… something which half of you people usually condemn.

    Think I’m joking about you not owning your games?

    “We expect to keep all games supported for as long as people continue to play them, but at a minimum, all current games will be supported for 3 years after their release on the OnLive Service.”

    And should they decide to get rid of a game? Tough shit.

    Imagine if someone called to your house one day and decided he was allowed to take that old game you cherished but haven’t touched in years, simply because you haven’t played it?

    Yeah.

    This whole Cloud bubble is going to burst the moment one big company goes under.

    @10 Yeah, and most ISPs will still suck and have limited bandwidth allowances that will make using cloud gaming as a permanent option nigh on impossible. The speeds will go up over time, but so will the image resolutions and bandwidth requirements.

    You can only fit so much data through those wires. Christ, high speed broadband still hasn’t even penetrated into the public completely yet.

    Hardware is funny like that. Always chasing its own tail.

    #17 2 years ago
  18. rrw

    it like netflix and blu ray really.

    want high quality video? buy blu ray movie with blu ray drive

    want quick video experienced? download netflix on you laptop/phone

    it’s options. pretty sure PS4 still have next gen ND game on BDXL

    #18 2 years ago
  19. ManuOtaku

    I agree with Erthazus and Ireland Michael on this trend, that is also my way of thinking for the reasons well established by both of them, i will not add anything, they did cover pretty much all i have to say in this matter.
    p.s Regarding cloud gaming that is

    #19 2 years ago
  20. rrw

    IMO i also dont like cloud gaming in general. but i dont think it’s bad purchased. in addition of opening new section of consumer this allow sony to have future proof service. so they dont have to worry about stuff like BC

    not to mention this can open new possibility like playing uncharted on sony phone or TV.

    #20 2 years ago
  21. DrDamn

    Good article. It could well turn out to be an expensive misstep, but lets see what they actually want to do with it before writing it off.

    MS may have a lot of Cloud experience already, but I would assume the problems and solutions are quite different between Office and gaming. Maybe not. So MS may want to buy OnLive for the tech and patents (that one could be a biggy and a huge consideration for the Gaikai purchase).

    In terms of Sony the tech Gaikai have presumably could also be used to enhance remote play between PS3 and Vita too?

    #21 2 years ago
  22. The_Red

    Great read as always. I really like Mr Fahey’s editorials even though I don’t usually agree with them. That said, there are a lot of interesting and insightful points here worthy of further discussion.

    I just hope Sony doesn’t pull another Move / Vita where they invest in something sweet and then completely ruin it by misstep after misstep as #5 said.

    #22 2 years ago
  23. stealth

    i agree its not going to change anything

    #23 2 years ago
  24. lexph3re

    Ireland you cant say everyone won’t use it to everyone using it will sap up the ISPs bandwidths. This is a good move for them to stay competitive market against MS with win 8 being compatible over a wide range of devices.

    Technology like this will appeal to a specific demographic. This doesn’t mean stop buying physical mediums. Thats just ove exaggerated the circumstance pointing out current flaws. This thing could be amazing in the future could be crap.

    #24 2 years ago
  25. Ireland Michael

    @24 I expressly stated in #10 that it will be a useful niche for those who will have a use for it. But it’s not “teh futoor!1!”, and it never will be.

    #25 2 years ago
  26. Kabby

    I wonder what the new name for the service will be.

    #26 2 years ago
  27. Patrick Garratt

    @26 – PaiSai.

    #27 2 years ago
  28. Ireland Michael

    @26 (P)laystation (O)nline (S)treaming

    #28 2 years ago
  29. Phoenixblight

    I agree with this article. Its about accessibility not about replacement of the console or replacement of downloadable or physical media.

    “now that the acquisition party has started, who’s going to buy OnLive?”

    No one will Gaikai are innovators they actually improve the cloud technology just like they did with using Google’s native CLient without the need of download or Java. Microsoft already have Cloud services what Onlive does is not that much harder than what Microsoft are doing with their services.

    #29 2 years ago
  30. DonnieTC

    Sounds great! I personally love OnLive and have spent a total of around $250 games for over 30 games with a total playtime of over 500 hours. As far as how this affects the industry…well that all hinges on what Sony plans to do with their acquisition. People love to hate on cloud gaming but really I think it is extremely innovative and definitely where the future is heading. For most of the games I don’t even notice all the lag and blurriness some people bring up and whether it’s playing on my phone, tablet, TV, or computer it feels like I’m playing locally. As far as not getting anything physical or technically owning anything…it’s not a big deal to me. I pay upwards of $10 for a movie ticket and even more for a concert ticket. Do I get anything back? Nope just a few hours of enjoyment. Comparing that to some of the games that I’ve spent over 30 hours playing on OnLive and I think that’s a pretty good deal! As far as cloud gaming not picking up any momentum let me leave this as a comparison:

    Number of games available on Steam after 3 years of service: 18

    Counter-Strike
    Day of Defeat
    Deathmatch Classic
    Half-Life 2
    Half-Life: Opposing Force
    Ricochet
    Team Fortress Classic
    Counter-Strike: Condition Zero 2
    Codename: Gordon
    Half-Life: Source
    Counter-Strike: Source
    Half-Life 2: Deathmatch
    Half-Life 2
    Half-Life: Blue Shift
    Day of Defeat: Source
    Rag Doll Kung Fu
    Half-Life 2: Lost Coast
    Darwinia

    Number of games available on OnLive after 2 years of service: 297

    #30 2 years ago
  31. lexph3re

    Actually, it is “teh futoor!1″ because its a future service to be implemented in a larger array of devices with easier access to It. Cloud will be another excellent feature to all future devices.

    #31 2 years ago
  32. Ireland Michael

    @31 You know full well what I meant by the remark.

    People are acting like this is going to redefine gaming and the Internet as we know it. It isn’t.

    #32 2 years ago
  33. lexph3re

    redefine internet and gaming? nah, but hardware and communication? yeah that will be something to redefine

    #33 2 years ago
  34. rrw

    it will just like mobile gaming today. in 5 years time we will see it common but not replacing console gaming

    #34 2 years ago
  35. OlderGamer

    Some of you folks are thinking as games as individual pieces of entertainment. As things you buy, own, play, charish, and replay forever.

    But that is wrong. That is a hardcore, dedicated gamers way of thinking.

    You need to see games more like movies. Or even TV shows.

    Most people watch them once and move on to something else. Keep in mind I said Most people, not some uber nerd that watches Family Guy every day back to back to back. Most people watch something, enjoy it and move on. That is why Instant viewing on something like Netflix works.

    People aren’t paying for the Movie/TV show. They are paying for the rights to watch it. And when they are done watching it, they move on to another one. It doesn’t bother them at all if the movie is there for a limited time, because they got to see it.

    Who here still plays Halo, or Halo 2 and yet owns Halo Reach? Who Plays FIFA 07 and plays it instead of playing FIFA 12(that they also own)?

    That is the key element that people aren’t grasping here. Digital entertainment is about what you can do right now, today. If today I can select from several games to play, I am happy. Whatever I am in the mood to play, I can play. If the selection changes next week, I just play something else.

    The key here isn’t what do you do with “Your” game(btw read the elua, you don’t own a game now, you only bought limited rights to use it in the fashion that the liscince holder allows). The key here is making as much content avalible at the lowest enter point possible. If your paying, 20usd/month, are you going to care that Uncharted 5 is only avalible to play for four or five years? No, most people won’t care, because in five years there will be Uncharted 6 or 7 and they have moved on to something new.

    You have to look at thing not as gamers that Bought NES games, and built up large piles of game boxes over the years, but as consumers in the digital age. I have shelves of records. Yes Stacks of Wax, 45s and 78s, rows of them. Do I ever use them anymore? No. Why? Because I also have a MP3 player and that plugs into my sterio and car.

    Look at things from that point of view.

    I can’t play my records in my car. I can’t listen to them while on a walk in the park. Does anyone want to ditch their MP3s and return to phonographs? Me either. Stop being afraid of change. Full blown cloud gaming isn’t here yet. It isn’t ready yet. But it is being planed for, and the industry had better get ready, because it is on its way.

    I am pretty positive that selling games one at a time through a streamed service is not going to be the way cloud will work. That is one reason OnLive fails right now. they are trying to sell games like a store does, one at a time at a high end price. I believe these services will be much more like Sega Channel(Gen/MD in NA), or like Netflix. One reasonable flat monthly fee, unlimited play, and a rotating line up of 3rd party games, with a consitant stable of first party exclusives.

    I would really like to see this lead to the end of yearly franshise updates like EA Sports or CoD. Tweaking the game clients should be easier with streaming games. Also adding Content like Map Packs and roster updates should be a cinch too. But just like you gamers, some of the established industry gurus need to rething gaming and how games are delivered…and most importantly at what price points. Steaming me 100usd PS4 games obviously isn’t going to work.

    Outside the Box, people. Ignore the Box. There is no Box. Must think outside the Box.

    #35 2 years ago
  36. Ireland Michael

    “There is no Box”

    And that, my friend, is the problem.

    You’re deluding yourself if you think they’re going to be generous and give consumers ease of use and convenience, frankly. They’re going to milk people for every penny that they’re worth.

    #36 2 years ago
  37. OlderGamer

    I don’t use OnLive anymore. Once in awhile I check in to see what has been added to their Play Pass. But most of the time it is stuff I can get somewhere else or already have, or am just not interested in. Like I said the trying to seel people signle games at high prices to stream is pointless and flawed. Why would I want Dirt Showdown on OnLive for the same price i can have it on Steam for?

    That is why I say for cloud to work it has to be like Sega Channel/Netflix. One monthly sub(at a sensible price point), and a large pool of games to play. If they do that, changing the games in that pool won’t bother too many people. So long as the games in that pool aren’t stupid off name games that no one wants to play(like is often the case with OnLive).

    #37 2 years ago
  38. Cee

    Remote play for vita is a possibility too?

    #38 2 years ago
  39. DrDamn

    @36
    Like PS+ for example? Generous, easy to use and convenient. :). You are making a lot of assumptions on what and how this will be used with little concrete to back it up.

    #39 2 years ago
  40. DrDamn

    @38
    Remote play already works on some titles – like it does on PSP. This purchase could certainly help the tech behind remote play though.

    #40 2 years ago
  41. OlderGamer

    But, Mike apply this”

    “You’re deluding yourself if you think they’re going to be generous and give consumers ease of use and convenience, frankly. They’re going to milk people for every penny that they’re worth”

    To music in 1985.

    It parrelels the games industry today. I believe the current model of expensive hardware and expensive game prices(dev costs and retail) are unsustainable. I think if things continue to go that route the console industry will consume itself. All that will be left of games down the road will be mobile/handheld/tablet/phone type stuff playing simple and cheap games. I know on a dedicated website for games, that sounds like crazy talk.

    But if you steped into a Music store in 1985 and talked about the death of the physical medium, they too would have laughed. Now it is tuff to even find a physical music store. They have become niche and irrelevent.

    #41 2 years ago
  42. Ireland Michael

    @37 That’s never going to happen.

    It’s hard enough for companies to make a profit out of games as it is, and they’re only going to continue to get more and more expensive. Publishers are not going to risk bottoming out their physical and digital sales for a subscription based option.

    “To music in 1985.”

    You still have to pay for every single song though, unless you’re pirating them. The entry cost is vastly lower.

    Note that I did mention “digital” media in my post. I never said it had to be physical. But people still want to *own* their stuff, whether physical or digital. And that’s why Steam and GoG are so damn popular.

    You literally own nothing with cloud gaming. If a company wants to stop listing their game, there’s absolutely nothing you can do about it. You. Snt store it on your HDD, you can’t back it up, you can’t burn it to a disk. Nothing.

    Nobody, and I do mean *nobody*, wants that.

    Cloud gaming is the ultimate DRM.

    #42 2 years ago
  43. Cee

    @40 Exactly.
    Takes out the restrictions of the PS3 Hardware if Sony should ever find such “restrictions”.

    #43 2 years ago
  44. knuck

    Please stop caring about input lag. You should be worrying about the real evil shit “cloud” gaming can/will bring, just look at Diablo 3. Here are some *good* things the cloud might give you:

    - No need for physical media
    - No need to download stuff
    - No more cheaters

    All that at the expense of:

    - Always-on DRM by design
    - The [high] possibility of a publisher pulling the plug on any game you might have “bought” (not really bought because games will be considered “services”) simply because not many people play it
    - Stormy weather? No videogames for you
    - Some hackers decided to DDoS game servers? No game for you
    - Wanna play a game while someone elses watches Netflix and downloads some torrents? Tough luck
    - Wanna play an old map? Too bad, they removed it, for everyone
    - Got reported by someone? Guess it’s time to get a new account, because you’re banned forever!

    Please be smart and *don’t* be a part of this. It’s just a bunch of suits eager to fuck you over.

    EDIT: Please do not forget there will be no loading screens. Yay? Nah, they’ll be replaced by ads. =]

    #44 2 years ago
  45. xino

    good job Patrick for breaking the news. I thought the news was fake, and everyone expected it at E3 sony conference.

    good stuff, you are becoming like Hip Hop Gamer:)
    who breaks news early on, and later news becomes true

    #45 2 years ago
  46. OlderGamer

    But isn’t something like Siurus(sp?) radio(satilite streaming radio) basicly the same type of service? Where you pay to listen, but don’t own anything? Or even cable TV or Dish TV? The focus is just on the service and not the individal pieces of content. I just think that type of biz model is going to be a big part of the games industry down the road.

    #46 2 years ago
  47. knuck

    @46 and you’re right! Other than trying to get people *not* to be a part of this, I’m pretty sure the great majority (“lol cod ownz u nub sux lmoa” kind of people) are going to flock like sheep to the cloud.

    I’m just trying to delay it so videogames won’t suck [completely] so soon. :(

    #47 2 years ago
  48. DrDamn

    @42
    PS+. Lots of publishers on board, great value, popular, and you own nothing. Just get to play while you sub. Different way of doing it, but similar principles.

    #48 2 years ago
  49. Christopher Jack

    @35, I’d agree with your if all franchises were like Fifa or CoD with yearly releases, but they’re not. People continue to play the older Halo’s- Halo 3 still remains one of XBL’s most played games, & people will give a shit if they can’t go back to an earlier Uncharted game. Even movies have replay value well beyond their release date, there’s a reason Star Wars continues to sell, people love it & will always go back to it, but they obviously get pissed whenever they change it. You’re talking purely from your perspective & you seem to hold very little value from past experiences, a little ironic coming from an OlderGamer.

    I personally think that gaming altogether will follow Steam, except with the addition of cloud gaming. You buy a game from retail, you connect it to your account & can download it or stream it from anywhere so long as your account is connected to it- that is the best possible outcome of the next console gen, imo. I do think physical games should be playable with multiple accounts, so long as its offline, I do think the online pass that EA, THQ & all that would work in that regard, simply switching the owner of the game to use its online features, then the new account holder of the game would have access to playing it online, streaming it through the cloud, & downloading to their console if they choose to. I don’t like it but it is the best option from my point of view.

    #49 2 years ago
  50. Demiath

    Sounds like a dreadfully mundane business plan to me. Come back to when you’ve got that streaming box ready, Sony/Gaikai. At least OnLive shoots for the moon by aiming for the actual future of gaming rather than some poor man’s advertisement platform for peripheral hardware which only detract from meaningful core gaming experiences.

    #50 2 years ago
  51. Christopher Jack

    @50, Who says that Gaikai will only stream demos? Sony already has the PlayStation 3 & that has an install base of 65million. So much potential here.

    #51 2 years ago
  52. Kabby

    The problem with streaming console games is you need to run the code on something. You can’t just hook up some PS3′s on a 1:1 contention basis. You need a server farm.

    Which means you are going to need a specialized machine OR you need to emulate a PS3 on PC hardware.

    #52 2 years ago
  53. rrw

    why not use PS3 as sever then

    #53 2 years ago

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