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Games of the generation: Dave picks the seismic shifts

Monday, 4th November 2013 12:54 GMT By Dave Cook

What were the games of the current generation? VG247′s staff pick their highlights of the past 8 years ahead of the PS4 and Xbox One launch. This time, Dave gets crushed in a tectonic shift of big ideas.

We’re dedicating this week to VG247′s personal games of the generation. We’ll post a different team member’s list each day, so stay tuned to see what we all thought.

What are the best games of the generation?

It’s a big question isn’t it? How do you even begin to approach it? What makes one game better or more significant than another? Well, I think that all depends on how you define words like “best” or “significant” in this context. There are so many parameters to consider and perspectives from which to approach this topic that it’s always going to be a subjective issue. No one really ‘wins’ a generation outright, but there are many games out there that affect us each in a personal manner, and enrich our hobby in new ways.

To me, the “best” games of any generation aren’t necessarily the most enjoyable, but those that bring wild new ideas to the table, inspire their competitors to do better, and persuade rival studios to think outside the box. I’ve decided to pick my five games based on that criteria. It’s worth pointing out that these aren’t in any significant order, or intended as definitive answers to the big question above, but they are five games that made me think differently about my hobby or the industry in a new light.

So without further stalling for time, here are my five games of the generation.

5. LittleBigPlanet
Creative elements in console games were around before Media Molecule unleashed its smiling toolbox onto the world in 2008, but they had never been delivered with such depth and finesse. While not as expansive as its sequel, the original LittleBigPlanet broke down the barriers of what it meant to be a ‘game.’ Core quest aside, the game could be whatever you wanted it to be, with a powerful suite of creative gadgets and gizmos that gave rise to a big community brimming with wild and wonderful ideas.

From its release and through several sequels, Media Molecule’s charming IP has left a trail of inspired followers in its wake, each eager to take a sloppy bite of the creation pie. Look to the industry today and you’ll an abundance of titles boasting creative elements in comparison to the previous generation. A quick name-check draws forth the likes of Trials Evolution, Terraria and Minecraft, each delivering creativity in unique ways.

But let’s forget games that allow you to build from the ground up for a second. You can even see LittleBigPlanet’s influence in games that offer only slight creative freedom. Since the game dropped, there has been a visible rise in titles that let players modify assets already present in the game, such as character creation or custom decals. These elements and the ability to build in games took an undeniable upswing after the launch of LittleBigPlanet and there’s no doubt in my mind that it’s wasn’t a coincidence. All arguments aside, any game that gets young or typically passive minds thinking creatively is surely worthy of applause. That’s why it’s absolutely LBP has earned a place on my list.

4. Call of Duty: Modern Warfare
Let’s be brutally honest here; Infinity Ward’s triggered something of a fierce, industry-wide trend when it dropped Call of Duty 4 on to the world in 2007. The seminal shoter was massively influential, even if some of you may see that trend as more of a plague. Every man, woman and their dog seemed hungry to rip off the game’s twitch, military template off without a hint of shame, but no game did cinematic warfare better than this at the time. Oh and that campaign is simply incredible, even to this day. Remember the TV studio shoot-out, the nuke twist, that stealth mission in Russia?

The plot was a masterclass in corridor pacing, with the tension ebbing and flowing just at the right moments to hold your interest. Incredibly, the story wasn’t utter waffle – I felt the studio saved that for Modern Warfare 2 – and the end result was a fitting homage to the militaristic action flick. Price’s ‘tache was pretty rockin’ too. Did I mention the stealth mission already? I did? Just checking. Throw in a superbly balanced and relatively sober multiplayer without the head-crushing mountains of shit exploding everywhere, and you have a well-rounded package that kept this particular critic hooked for a year after release.

It’s also worth noting the rolling XP-based progression mechanic and the ability to prestige, both of which have been copied in several franchises since. You can see Call of Duty 4′s influence in many titles today, even in the rival Battlefield series. I don’t even consider that a bad thing as developers of both franchises can learn a lot from one another, so this definitely isn’t a dig. Titanfall, Battlefield 4, Spec Ops: The Line and many other shooters have cribbed from Infinity Ward’s big book of ‘How to make your shooter exciting and engaging.’ Love or hate it, many walks of the industry owe Modern Warfare a debt.

3. Gears of War
I know that games like Kill.Switch and Winback introduced the ‘wider’ world to cover shooting as we know it today, but Gears of War made the notion sing. The game was considered a massive coup for Microsoft when it secured its Xbox 360 exclusivity in 2006, and when I look back now I feel that yeah, it certainly was. Why is it on the list? Well, just look at how many games have used the same cover-hugging tricks and techniques Epic Games brought to the table. You only need to look to Mass Effect 3, Uncharted 3, GTA 5 and Deus Ex: Human Revolution to see examples of games presenting new spins on the old format

Some would say that the mechanic has been over-used in the same way the Call of Duty format has been flogged over the years, but I see it more as a solution to a big problem. It’s a mechanic that makes for smoother transitions in 3D space, and in games where stealth is a factor you no longer have to clumsily navigate your avatar out of the enemy’s line of sight. You can now simply snap to cover and slide along walls, safe in the knowledge that you’re concealed.

The same goes for dodging hailstorms of bullets. Can you recall just how painful it was to hide from gunfire in games before snapping to cover was an option? You never quite knew if you were hidden or not and fucking up meant you could be killed in seconds without any room to reply. Confirming that you were hidden required a lot of edging your avatar around and manipulating the camera after every few steps to get a clear view around corners. Gears of War didn’t figure that conundrum out – again: see Winback and Kill.Switch – but it polished it to an attractive sheen that showed the world it could work. The rest is history.

2. GTA 4
Okay, stop hurling feces at me and I’ll explain why I’ve opted for the fourth game over GTA 5. Cast your mind back to Grand Theft Auto 3 and just try to remember how you felt when taking those first, mind-blowing steps into Liberty City. This was it man, the dream. It was a ‘real’, living city with odd-looking polygon people walking around, cars begging to be jacked and hell to be raised. It was like Rockstar North had delved into many of our minds and replicated what we thought the future of gaming would look like, but it was there in front of us, actually happening.

The PS2 game sparked a sandbox gold rush that would roll on for years through such series as Crackdown, Prototype, inFamous, Saints Row, Assassin’s Creed and many more. Despite GTA 4′s many flaws it still delivered a world that felt more believable and organic than those presented by the competition. I’m not saying the games listed above are bad – far from it, they’re each superb in their own ways – but Rockstar North remained unmatched in the world-building stakes.

Some people didn’t give two shits about things like Liberty City’s ‘working’ internet pages, the in-game phone, and many of its myriad mechanics, but chances are you found something special in that urban maze of decay that spoke to you. The sheer volume of options and tools in that play-space is still incredible to this day. To that end, I think GTA 4 was the kind of game that generated many ‘water-cooler’ moments. Conversations about how people tackled certain missions or insane rampages they exacted on the cops went on for months to years after the game released. You couldn’t escape it. Many of us didn’t want to.

Those emergent tales are more likely if a game world offers unbridled freedom and a vast tool-set to play around with. GTA 4 hit that bullseye with confidence. Years later, Rockstar North built upon that solid base to deliver GTA 5, a game that delivers a vast improvement in almost every aspect. So while Niko’s escapades may have soured the mouths of one-time fans since they came to pass, we can’t overlook just how significant that eye-opening jaunt into Liberty City has become.

1. Braid
Is this controversial? Maybe, but the list is in no specific order and like all the titles here I’ve chosen Braid for its wider impact and influence on the industry. It’s importance to modern gaming is simply immeasurable, even if you dislike Jonathan Blow and his game. The artistic, time-bending platformer charmed gamers with its beautiful art style and dreamy musical score, while the undercurrent of plot kept players guessing. Who was Tim really? Was he a frustrated lover or was he really the man who birthed the atomic bomb? Was he the hero or villain? I had never seen a game of Braid’s stature spark so much debate, yet I shouldn’t have been surprised.

After all, the indie scene had always proved populous on PC, yet the console market was yet to present the world with a suitable outlet for the creativity of solo coders and small teams. Xbox Live Arcade helped ease the issue, but the marketplace still needed that first, ground-shaking indie hit. When Braid came along it proved anyone, even the little guy could make their riches in the shark pool of the blockbuster circuit. You no longer required the publishing might of colossi like EA or Activision to make money in that arena. Financial and critical success could belong to anyone, even the cash poor. All you needed was an idea and the talent to pull it off.

Of course, we now know that in reality Xbox Live Arcade was a costly route to market, and certainly not the dream ticket we all thought it was once Jonathan Blow’s name started making the headlines. Even if you consider Braid’s runaway success an anomaly, it’s quite clear that it left a prominent mark on the industry. It appeared to open floodgates on both sides of the fence. On one side we saw a torrent of new, emerging independent talent rising up and getting their content out on consoles and Steam, while critics grew more accepting of the ‘curio’ title.

We now live in a world where Hotline Miami, The Stanley Parable, Gone Home, Dear Esther, Thomas Was Alone and Papers, Please are considered equals to the triple-a blockbuster juggernauts. They’re most certainly seen as headline-worthy across a wider range of sites. Indie games from relatively unknown coders or teams are no longer deemed a gamble, and many of us have stopped approaching them with preconceptions of lower quality. These teams are now respected as the artists, story-tellers and influential people that they are.

It’s impossible to pin this all on Braid alone, but I guarantee that Blow’s hit revealed a wider, brighter world to a significant amount of people out there. The game has since led me on to new, thought-provoking experiences across the years and has opened my eyes to wonderful things. I suspect I’m not alone in this either.

Well folks that’s all, I’m going to run for the nearest exit before the baying mob strips me of my skin and wears it as a rain smock. In case you did wonder, my ‘other’ games of the generation from an overall perspective include but are not restricted to Bayonetta, Dark Souls, Lost Odyssey, Uncharted 2: Among Thieves, Portal, The Walking Dead, BioShock, Journey, Left 4 Dead, Fallout 3, Mass Effect 2 and more I’ve definitely forgotten.

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101 Comments

  1. braindead1981

    Good list. In terms of “redifining gaming”, one could also argue for Journey or Super Mario Galaxy, since one delivered a completely unrivaled experience (not so much “game” necessarily), whereas Galaxy defined (again) what a 3D platforming game could be and do.

    #1 1 year ago
  2. KineticCalvaria

    @1, Pretty sure those two were on Eurogamers GotG list, don’t want VG247 to look like they’re copying EG do we now? :)

    #2 1 year ago
  3. Dave Cook

    @1 Thanks :) Journey is pretty special yeah, really enjoyable game, as is Galaxy.

    @2 and all the other sites doing ‘things of the generation’ articles yeah ;)

    #3 1 year ago
  4. monkeygourmet

    @2

    Yep, Mario Galacock was voted Number 1 on Eurogaymer. Wow… Who’d have thought slipping a ‘cock’ in would be so difficult?!

    That kid had skills…

    #4 1 year ago
  5. KineticCalvaria

    @3, Jump on the bandwagon, eh Dave :).

    #5 1 year ago
  6. Dave Cook

    @5 Nah, I was more like ‘oh’ when I saw EG do it. It’s something I had wanted to do for a while. Our lists are neat though, they each take a different, personal angle.

    Steph’s up tomorrow!

    #6 1 year ago
  7. Dave Cook

    @4 ??????

    #7 1 year ago
  8. KineticCalvaria

    @6, I’m only joking anyway :).

    #8 1 year ago
  9. Dave Cook

    @8 I know :)

    #9 1 year ago
  10. CyberMarco

    Personally my “Game of this generation” is Fallout 3 hands down.

    First time playing a Fallout game. Started it without having a clue about the lore or anything regarding the Fallout universe. Saw some random youtube videos and was a bit hesitant at first, but when I escaped the vault 101, just wow!

    The feeling of adventuring into the wild and unknown post-apocalyptic world had me pumped for the entire game.

    I could immerse myself into the game and forget how the time went by. Not to mention the mods. I think I’ve finished the game 2-3 times and still want to replay it, being the supervillain this time. muahahahaha xD

    Also, I played it on a crappy Pentium 4 with 1gb of ram! :P

    #10 1 year ago
  11. Dave Cook

    @10 It was an influential game yeah. I’d say I preferred New Vegas though, but they both have great positives.

    Remember those first steps out of Vault 101? Insane.

    #11 1 year ago
  12. Dragon

    @Dave,
    I will put up the year end poll at the end of month. Another one for game of the generation sounds good?
    Doubt any sites are taking polls on that :D

    PS- Will need Michael for counting.

    #12 1 year ago
  13. G1GAHURTZ

    No Jetpack Joyride???

    What kind of list is this!?!?

    #13 1 year ago
  14. Telepathic.Geometry

    Uurgh, Call of Duty and Gears of War Dave. Aaaaarrgghh…

    I know, I know, opinions and arseholes. But who could have known our arseholes would be this different…

    #14 1 year ago
  15. Dave Cook

    @12 yes, and you’ll have my full support on this, I promise. Do you have my email address?

    #15 1 year ago
  16. G1GAHURTZ

    What about Angry Birds, eh?

    #16 1 year ago
  17. Dave Cook

    @13 :O

    That game is stupidly addictive mind.

    @14 I think in many cases I’m looking at the mechanics or influence beyond the game’s content itself. Both Gears and CoD 4 were unquestionably influential throughout the gen.

    #17 1 year ago
  18. Obernox

    Great read Dave, although i never felt Little Big Planet made ripples in the industry.

    @CyberMarco Totally agree with you there. Fallout 3 was mind-blowing when i first played it.

    #18 1 year ago
  19. Dave Cook

    @16 Angry Birds shits for the birds my friend.

    #19 1 year ago
  20. G1GAHURTZ

    @17:

    I’m level 698!

    #20 1 year ago
  21. romuloff

    Glad that you mentioned Mass Effect 2 in the end, :p . Overall, good list, I hope that the next gen bring more games with this level of quality.

    #21 1 year ago
  22. G1GAHURTZ

    I think Angry birds showed everyone exactly how much money you could make with touchscreen gaming…

    #22 1 year ago
  23. absolutezero

    I had a conversation about this a couple of days ago with a mate and it struck me that I could not think of a single title that stood head and shoulders above everything else like Resident Evil 4 did for me the previous generation.

    Its not that the quality of titles is lacking and its not that the influential titles are missing its just personally nothing has blown me away unlike multiple titles from the past. I can still remember the day I got Metal Gear Solid 1 after waiting 6 odd months from the US release, entering the village for the first time in RE 4. Theres been nothing like that this generation for me. At a push my games of this generation would be the games that I feel deeply in love with over and above the games that changed things.

    1. Uncharted 2 – An almost perfect console game, with so much focus and love poured into it, its just a joy to play and stands up to repeat visits.

    2. Bayonetta – Astounding depth of combat which leads into an ever increasing level of escalation and crazy.

    3. Both Metro titles – Level design, atmosphere and a sense of place taken to such a degree that simply walk around its world became a pleasure, it took the moral systems seen in horrible Bioware games and refined them to work within gameplay and within the World, your actions are what affect the morality of your character not some binary choice in a menu.

    4. Amnesia – Rebooted the entire horror genre after the major publishers completely abandoned it stating a lack of sales and no audience. The culmination of all the experiments in style and interaction Frictional worked on throughout the Penumbra series.

    5. Dark Souls – Never under-estimate the player. Never assume that you need to make the story obvious, or need pop-up tutorials and every other simplification the industry has gone through. Make your game good enough and the community will band togethor and work everything out for themselves.

    #23 1 year ago
  24. Obernox

    Gears of War 2 is a worthy mention. Gears 2 introduced the mighty popular “Horde mode” which h appeared in many games in their own form. CoD: Zomies, Halo 3: ODST’s Firefight, Mass Effect 3.

    #24 1 year ago
  25. fihar

    I quite agree on Fallout 3.
    It felt like the first game in a series instead of a third one, although it could be called a reboot in some ways. The post-apocalyptic atmosphere of the game was simply amazing.
    Gameplay-wise, New Vegas is miles better but I was more sucked in to the Capital Wasteland.

    I’d put LA Noire into consideration, one of my favorite of this generation and a great way to use technology to enhance gameplay experience.

    EDIT: Just noticed that you put Lost Odyssey in the end there, Dave.
    That’s nice, people tend to not gave that game enough credit because it’s quite slow but it had one of the best story and characters in any RPG this gen and an amazing short story collection in the Thousand Years of Dreams.

    #25 1 year ago
  26. Dragon

    @Dave,
    &^*^@vg653.com ?

    Changed the digits since, you know, trolls.

    #26 1 year ago
  27. Rockstar Vienna

    Hi VG247! :D

    My “GOTG” is Red Dead Redemption. One of the best stories i’ve ever played, a beautiful world with amazing detail and with John Marston one of the best characters in video game history if you ask me. Can’t wait for a new Red Dead on PS4! :)

    #27 1 year ago
  28. braindead1981

    @3 yeah. In conclusion, I think we’ve been graced with a generation full of great games (whether they brought new things to the table or not). Oh, and of course Braid kicked my ass and I loved every minute of it. I think it’s been long enough that I have forgotten most of the puzzles, so maybe time to replay it, this time on Steam. :)

    #28 1 year ago
  29. monkeygourmet

    1. Dark Souls
    2. Fallout New Vegas / Fallout 3
    3. Mario Galaxy
    4. Tomb Raider Reboot
    5. Red Dead Redemption

    Why?

    It’s a secret.

    #29 1 year ago
  30. polygem

    my ultraultimate top 3 in no particular order:

    mario galaxy
    halo reach
    demons souls

    these three really are -by far- the most fun and impressive games i have played this gen and man i played a lot of games :)

    worth mentioning: bioshock, bayonetta, fallout 3, the orange box, journey indeed…

    #30 1 year ago
  31. Joe Musashi

    Noteworthy selections there Dave. I guess that unofficial Streets of Rage remake game that Sega shut down didn’t make the cut, huh?

    I like how you’ve stressed “I” and “Me” and “My” in the article too.

    JM

    #31 1 year ago
  32. manamana

    Nice list, Dave. Let me add: Minecraft and Journey.

    #32 1 year ago
  33. monkeygourmet

    @31

    He can put “I” and “Me” and “My” as much as he wants, doesn’t make his choices right.

    #33 1 year ago
  34. DrDamn

    Nice article Dave. You can look at the Games of a Generation in quite a few ways, so specifically saying you are picking out something like the Seismic Shifts is a good way to do it I think.

    I’d have had Demon’s Souls in there certainly, but I can see why most of the rest are there. GTAIV is the exception – more because I don’t think it influenced things as much as the other titles you included. In a strange way I think it influenced stuff in a different way – GTAV is a better game because of lessons learned in what GTAIV did wrong not in improving what it did right for example.

    #34 1 year ago
  35. Joe Musashi

    @33 I’m sure he feels his choices are right to him.

    JM

    #35 1 year ago
  36. Captain_Iglo

    1. Battlefield Bad Company 1
    2. Uncharted 2
    3. Skyrim
    4. Resistance 1
    5. Operation Flashpoint : Dragon Rising (despite some huge flaws, I enjoyed every moment on it)

    #36 1 year ago
  37. Dave Cook

    @25 Lost Odyssey is just beautiful.

    #37 1 year ago
  38. Dave Cook

    @27 It’s a stunning game, great choice :D

    #38 1 year ago
  39. Dave Cook

    @33 that’s not the point Monkey. It’s not about my choices being right or wrong. They’re just my personal favourites from an influence standpoint. It’s okay to disagree or agree.

    #39 1 year ago
  40. Ekona

    For me, the original Assassin’s Creed trumps everything in this gen in terms of bringing an experience to the table that is unforgettable. Finally, we had a game where you could literally go anywhere you could see (except the water, who knew that assassins were such crap swimmers?), and a story that dared to touch on religion without pandering to it.

    Those first few steps you took over the mountain and saw the whole of Jerusalem below you… Breathtaking.

    It gave you a sense of freedom and a way of attacking that didn’t penalise you too harshly if you got the sneaky stuff wrong and had to go all-out in swordplay. AC2 was by far the better game, but the original will always hold a dear place in my heart.

    Except for those damn flags.

    #40 1 year ago
  41. Ireland Michael

    LitteBigPlanet: <3

    #41 1 year ago
  42. monkeygourmet

    I love how people champion ‘Little Big Planet’ as a hive of creativity. Has anyone here on VG247 actually created their on level or even downloaded one that was in anyway playable or fun?

    I haven’t and the ones I have tried have been god awful. Trails HD easily stands out as a better exmaple of user created content IMO.

    Serious question!

    #42 1 year ago
  43. Dave Cook

    @42 Yes.

    Serious answer.

    #43 1 year ago
  44. DSB

    Little Big Planet just strikes me as a more modern version of The Incredible Machine. I don’t see how it connects to Minecraft or Terraria. Minecraft was inspired by Infiniminer, and Terraria mixed Minecraft with Castlevania.

    #44 1 year ago
  45. Ireland Michael

    @42 When was the last time you downloaded a level? The process was a bit messy in LBP1, but the spotlighting features of LBP2 and LBPVita have been doing a stellar job of highlighting absolutely great levels for some time now.

    #45 1 year ago
  46. Os Money

    kinda surprised no one said anything about minecraft…

    #46 1 year ago
  47. monkeygourmet

    @43

    Created or downloaded (or both)?

    I found the creation tools pretty clumsy. I think it may have been better with ‘move’ or on the Vita but I haven’t got around to trying that.

    #47 1 year ago
  48. Ireland Michael

    @47 They’re definitely not the most accessible tools, but my stepson picked them up in new time and couldn’t get enough for the game for months. All he would do is create stuff day in and day out, stuff I’m personally nowhere near creative enough to come up with.

    #48 1 year ago
  49. antraxsuicide

    @40
    Yes. So much yes. That game was so incredible.

    #49 1 year ago
  50. polygem

    i love jump and run games but i just can’t get into lbp. the floaty jumps, the forced humour (to me it feels like that), the ‘oh look we’re all hip and unique’ artdesign. i respect peoples love for this game. i can see the potential but i personally tried to like it with every new installment…i haven’t finished one of them. not a fan. not. at. all.

    #50 1 year ago
  51. Dragon

    Glad to see so much love for LBP. The best platformer this gen by a country mile imo.
    And also, probably blessed with one of the most creative communities in any console game. The packaged levels are generally just an icing on the cake for me. Highlighted community levels are among the best in the games.
    The community still keeps the game rocking after 3 years of release.

    #51 1 year ago
  52. brunomarcos

    #52 1 year ago
  53. Fin

    This is probably the only best-of list I fully agree with :O

    #53 1 year ago
  54. DrDamn

    @42
    Yes and Yes – even in LBP1.

    Creation I feel is an absolute blast to have fun with yourself. What you end up producing is irrelevant if you had fun creating it. One of my levels was a selection of Rockets I designed with various control mechanics. None of them were particularly successful but it was great fun doing it.

    In terms of finding good levels the trick in the first was finding one good creator then following their hearts and like to more and more.

    #54 1 year ago
  55. fihar

    I think some you guys are kinda missing the point of LBP’s inclusion here.

    There are possibly better examples of game with UGCs and obviously a lot of tighter platformers out there.
    But LBP was to my knowledge the first that brought UGC sharing to the forefront on consoles. Mods used to be restricted to PCs and while LBP wasn’t the first game to include a level creator toolkit, it was I believe the first that made sharing UGCs easily.

    Dave has stated that this list isn’t based on the quality of the game itself, but by how it acts as a game-changer to the industry as a whole.

    I mean, even Hitman took a page out of LBP’s book. A bald assassin studying from an anthromorphic… something wasn’t something you’d expect no?

    #55 1 year ago
  56. Clupula

    For me, the five best games of this gen, easily, were:

    5. Resonance of Fate
    4. Super Street Fighter IV
    3. Bayonetta
    2. Batman: Arkham City
    1. Valkyria Chronicles

    Of course, this is based on stuff I enjoy playing. I’d have to think long and hard about what games I feel changed gaming itself for this gen.

    #56 1 year ago
  57. Francis O

    @57

    Now I can see why you were so butt-hurt about Bayonetta 2 being on Wii U. LOL sucks being a drone, now you’ll just have to sit back and let the real gamers enjoy games on ALL SYSTEMS

    #57 1 year ago
  58. polygem

    “But LBP was to my knowledge the first that brought UGC sharing to the forefront on consoles”

    i think that was halo but well. yeah, i can see why lbp is on a game of the gen list. no problem, but man, do i disagree. these games just do not click with me at all.

    #58 1 year ago
  59. MadFlavour

    In no particular order, my games of the generation are:

    The last of us

    Dark Souls

    Portal/Portal 2

    Fallout 3

    Cod4

    Honorable mentions: Mass Effect 2, Red Dead Redemption, Bioshock, Oblivion, Fable 2, Dead Rising, Crackdown, etc etc.

    #59 1 year ago
  60. manamana

    @46 you haven’t read my comment then ;-)

    #60 1 year ago
  61. Joe Musashi

    @51 I really enjoyed LBP also and particularly admire what it set out to do. I have yet to check out LBP2 but it certainly set a precedent for wide-open community driven content on a console game. It didn’t hurt that Media Molecule made a pretty endearing ‘blank canvas’ character in Sackboy, had better-than-anyone-expected level designers and managed to compile a sensational soundtrack and include Stephen Fry’s voicework into the package. Pitch-perfect, for the most part.

    I’d not spent too much time with the games’ UGC but what I did see was quite engaging. (More so than what I saw in Infamous 2 – but the toolset was more restrictive in that game). It’s inappropriate to criticise the game for the imagination of its content creators. Finding that extra-special content was the key. But following the official channels and fan sites, it’s not hard to see some great stuff. And there was some very smart stuff produced that got reported when the game was enjoying its zeitgeist period. I understand the tools also improved in the sequel. But making something fun, no matter how good the tools are, is never going to be easy. Tools are simply a means to an end.

    The reveal of the game seemed to be the start of a turning point in the PS3′s life. The signature title that people were looking for had appeared to surface. This picture, taken moments after the reveal and the comment made by a competitor that they felt LBP was “on the wrong console” shows just what a significant title it was for this generation.

    JM

    #61 1 year ago
  62. fihar

    @58
    I completely forgot about Forge.

    It’s not about whether you like the game or not though, it’s about what the underlining concept brings to the table.

    #62 1 year ago
  63. Dragon

    @61,
    Same feelings here.
    “on the wrong console”
    http://www.joystiq.com/2007/10/29/reggie-fils-aime-thinks-littlebigplanet-is-on-the-wrong-console/

    That was hilarious, especially in hindsight.

    #63 1 year ago
  64. aseddon130

    Rayman Origins > Littlebigplanet

    #64 1 year ago
  65. fearmonkey

    I never owned a PS3 so I never played Little big planet, but it looked really good.

    I don’t really agree with Gears of War 3, the game was beautiful and interesting, but I never loved it. I played through the entire series, and even bought Judgement, but It’s not a favorite game of this gen.

    For me personally, the games of the generation were as follows (360 based)

    Kameo – This game really showed what the next gen could do, gorgeous graphics with hundreds of characters on the screen at a time, all fighting and doing their own thing. I thought it was amazing.

    Oblivion – I loved morrowind on Xbox, but it could never compare to the PC version. Oblivion was just amazing to me on console, it held me hostage for a long time.

    Viva Pinata – I loved this game enough that I did everything to get every achievement, I can’t say that about any other game besides Oblivion (which was just following all the quests, really easy). My girlfriend loved watching me play it, and thought it was the coolest game she had ever seen until…

    Alan Wake – The Cinematic atmosphere, the dark story, the graphics, everything about this game was class. The PC version is even better and just an amazing game.

    Dragon Age:Origins – The music, the storyline, the atmosphere, made this series one of my favorite RPG’s of this gen.

    Honorable mentions.

    Deus Ex: HR – The gameplay and the atmosphere were top notch. One of the very best looking high res PC games by the way.

    The Darkness – StarBreeze’s original was the best of the two, but both games are fun. The acting in the original grabbed you.

    Condemned: Criminal origins – Dark and creepy, and disturbing and a blast to play.

    Borderlands 2 – Only 3 games have had me so addicted that I have spent over 300 hours in gameplay, and this is one of them.

    Bioshock – The entire series is great, all three games are favs. Bioshock 2 isnt as good story wise as the first, but it’s combat is better.Infinite’s ending blew me away.

    Dead Space – Scary and action filled wwith Dread, the sequels were good but not as good as the original.

    Call Of Duty 2 – The first time I played this on 360, I was blown away at it’s graphics and atmosphere.

    Skyrim/Fallout 3, and Fallout:NV – The story in NV was amazing but the bugs in the game killed the game for me for a long time till it was heavily patched. Fallout 3 was more about exploration, and Skyrim was an atmospheric tour de force.

    #65 1 year ago
  66. Dragon

    @64,
    Rayman is great too. The art style is just fantastic.
    However I think lbp edges just a little because of endless fantastic levels, the difference its community makes.
    However, if they add UGC in Rayman, its over for lbp :P

    lbp and rayman are easily the top 2.

    #66 1 year ago
  67. Joe Musashi

    @63 I guess his body wasn’t ready.

    JM

    #67 1 year ago
  68. Legendaryboss

    Ignoring irony at @57: My list in no particular order:
    1. Every GTA Title. Personal Favourite Undecided.
    2. Every MGS Title. Same as 1.
    3. Any Handheld Traditional Pokemon Titles. Personal Favourite Pokemon Ruby And Sapphire.
    4. Any Naughty Dog Starting From 2007. Personal Favourite Uncharted 2.
    5. Red Dead Redemption Plus Its DLC
    6. Killzone 2
    7. Killzone Mercenary VS Fire Emblem Awakening.
    8. Killzone 3
    9. Sleeping Dogs.
    10. Max Payne 3.

    Worthy Mentions: Metal Gear Rising: Revengeance, Far Cry 3 and Others.

    Oh looks like i went over 10 (considering how many games are in the first 4 franchises).

    #68 1 year ago
  69. polygem

    That’s actually the thing. It’s a good game but it totally lacks some nintendo magic.

    #69 1 year ago
  70. Dragon

    “some nintendo magic”

    oh no you didn’t :P

    #70 1 year ago
  71. RussellGorall

    You put GTA4 and Gears in there, two of the most average big games out there, and then just to look hip you put Braid at the top?

    #71 1 year ago
  72. Legendaryboss

    @69
    Oh My God! OMG! OMG! Change it Polygem! Otherwise…

    http://img.pandawhale.com/post-25067-And-Here-We-Go-Joker-gif-Imgur-x71M.gif
    http://99gifs.com/-img/51f99e62afa96f5b3b00298b.gif

    #72 1 year ago
  73. Dragon

    ^ Sorry, but baby gifs are THE best.

    I win :D

    @67,
    I am quite sure his body still isn’t reggie.

    #73 1 year ago
  74. Legendaryboss

    @69
    Your body best be ready!

    #74 1 year ago
  75. Legendaryboss

    @73
    I bow to the master ;)

    #75 1 year ago
  76. Joe Musashi

    Awww, bless.

    But that’s the great thing about LBP and contributes so much to its landmark significance.

    It has magic coming from all corners of the globe. Ready to enjoy and share and build upon. Magic created by users, unrestrained by corporate-controlled branding or committee-directed themes. It wasn’t required to follow a template or pre-existing rules of what is or isn’t allowed to feature. The magic wasn’t held under lock and key in Kyoto, it was shared with everyone and further sharing was encouraged and the tools for more magic were handed over to the gamers.

    Magic doesn’t exist as a brand. It’s not owned by a corporation. LBP gave magic to everyone that wanted to make and share magic of their own.

    It’s a game that reaffirms why I believe it’s so important to break away from the standard templates. To be bold enough to try a new and experimental approach. When successful, as LBP has been – as a game, as an experiment, as an IP – it sets a timeless precedent.

    JM

    #76 1 year ago
  77. fihar

    @69
    Cute.
    What’s with the sudden use of proper capitals?

    #77 1 year ago
  78. Super Girevik

    Top 5 Industry Impacting Games
    ========================

    1) Street Fighter IV for reviving the fighting game genre.

    2) Batman Arkham Asylum for changing the misconception that comic book games are always poor quality.

    3) Super Mario Galaxy for proving why Nintendo still sets the standard for platform games.

    4) Call of Duty 4 for changing the FPS genre.

    5) Cave Story/Spelunky/Braid/Minecraft for starting the indie game revolution.

    #78 1 year ago
  79. KineticCalvaria

    @77, omg Poly is using capitals now? This site really is going to the dogs!

    Whatever next, Erthazus saying he loves CoD Ghosts on his ps3?!

    #79 1 year ago
  80. Panthro

    @78

    I do agree with everything but 1)

    Did it revive the fighting genre? I cant remember a change at all before or after it came out, care to educate me on what I missed?

    And I would lump Halo: combat evolved in 4) to ;)

    #80 1 year ago
  81. bradk825

    I like the theme of these games being game-changers as opposed to just looking at the top 5 in sales, especially since 4 of the 5 would be from the same franchise.

    Gears was a system-seller for Xbox. My friend Mike, a longtime Playstation gamer like I had once been came over and tried Gears on co-op with me. Within the week he had an Xbox 360, and still prefers Xbox to this day (Has a XB1 pre-ordered). It was gameplay style as mentioned in the article, but also the unique visuals, unique world, and the connection to Delta Squad that you quickly form in the gritty gameplay. Gears 1 will always be one of my all-time favourites.

    #81 1 year ago
  82. polygem

    @77: that was written on a mobile phone not a wiiu pad. back to wiiu right now as you can clearly see.

    @76: well if you think so. i disagree with that. i think it’s not half the masterpiece you are trying to make out of it. the game is first of all massmedia mainstream just like a mario or halo or uncharted. it plays it very safe in it’s core design. you are painting a picture of it as if it is the second coming. something truly groundbreaking. well, to me it was first of all an average game experience. it’s a soso game with some ugc elements on top of it and that’s it.
    to me it was a game with very mediocore gameplay mechanics, playing it save artdesign, cheesy humour (in a bad way), a huge dose of try hard zeitgeist hipness to a level that completeley killed everything that tried to be creative and fun about it. again, i can understand that people will strongly disagree with this but well, these are my honest feelings after playing all the lbp games…i mean halfway through them at least. they bored the shit out of me.

    #82 1 year ago
  83. monkeygourmet

    As a pure platformer, I’m sure most people would agree LBP is poor.

    Controls are pretty sloppy; it gets by on its art direction and how important people deem the user generated content. As a package though, it works and is helped along by the fact it’s an exclusive title.

    The Vita is easily home to the best version IMO, and I find the PS3 games severely overrated. When I first saw the original unveiling, I must admit it blew me away. Then I played it… For a game the relies heavily on physics based platforming, Sack Boy himself seems to lack any real solidity or feeling like he belongs ‘to the world’.

    Saying all that, it’s still the closest Sony have got in replicating a Nintendo like experience. Tearaway looks set to be the closest (interestingly another MM title).

    #83 1 year ago
  84. Darkfield

    @Dave and you played Dark Souls… how could u pick MW or GoW over Dark Souls, you now have a debuff Mister and it reads like -%10 public affection level.

    #84 1 year ago
  85. SplatteredHouse

    Gears is the one that I don’t go along with, out of that list. (Braid might be another, except I’ve not played enough of it to oppose its inclusion on any ground.)

    That Gears has inspired little more than terrible me-toos, (oh, and the fall from grace of a successful indie for its half-baked follow-up – that indie being, PEOPLE CAN FLY) and an absurd camera perspective from which your lug of a soldier blocks out most of the visible action on the screen, the upside of which, being that we get to witness these miraculous cloth textures on said lug’s clothing!

    Though it’s admittedly fun to play (the first, at least. By the second I could take or leave it, tbh), what it represents is a blotch upon the progress of the generation – a point where the ink spilled, yet someone tried to carry on writing. Epic would drive Bleszinki’s baby into a dead-end, before the gen was out. Some legacy, for the games to worsen as more time and money was spent.

    #85 1 year ago
  86. Super Girevik

    In Dave’s defense, Gears of War was a huge game, especially when it was first released. It set standards for graphics and featured third-person action that was soon cloned by other games. I can easily see this game being one that impacted the games industry.

    #86 1 year ago
  87. Joe Musashi

    I was informed earlier today that another’s personal choices are ‘wrong’.

    I’m certain that oddly shaped door swings both ways.

    JM

    #87 1 year ago
  88. polygem

    @87: “i” for one just disagree with “you”…it’s all cool. there’s no right or wrong here.

    #88 1 year ago
  89. monkeygourmet

    @87

    Sarcasm old bean.

    #89 1 year ago
  90. Super Girevik

    @87

    +1, why would anyone want to change someone’s opinion? If I wanted to talk to people who only shared my opinion, I would just talk to myself all day.

    I personally enjoy hearing people’s different views.

    #90 1 year ago
  91. Joe Musashi

    “04/11/13, 8:54 pm”
    “04/11/13, 8:54 pm”

    ಠ‿ಠ

    JM

    #91 1 year ago
  92. Legendaryboss

    I’ll give someone a cookie if they know which gif i would place in this scenario.

    #92 1 year ago
  93. polygem

    @91:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7Vf2sDgeu7k

    #93 1 year ago
  94. Joe Musashi

    ಠ_ಠ

    JM

    #94 1 year ago
  95. monkeygourmet

    @92

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-4ECgQBi4ff8/T2NPWakWnAI/AAAAAAAAMx8/hcMpKpUSExE/s1600/daily_gifdump_82_10.gif

    This one?

    #95 1 year ago
  96. absolutezero

    つ ◕_◕ ༽つGive DIRETIDE

    #96 1 year ago
  97. Legendaryboss

    @95
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S9RVS8cjNN0 You surpassed my expectations
    http://images.wikia.com/adventuretimewithfinnandjake/images/f/f3/DANCING_COOKIE.gif

    Dragon And I were right so that means: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0zszZJZqkhQ

    #97 1 year ago
  98. polygem

    @94:

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i45sk_pg15A

    #98 1 year ago
  99. Clupula

    @80 – SFIV very much revived the fighting genre. After SFIII, the genre was pretty much dead. Sure, SNK released yearly KOF titles for a while and 3D fighters were still a thing, but nobody wanted to make a big budget 2D/2.5D fighting game anymore. SFIV was a test. When it succeeded, suddenly we saw titles like BlazBlue, we saw titles like Injustice, the Mortal Kombat reboot, Guilty Gear was able to get a sequel after years of being ignored.

    SFIV brought a genre from being niche to being profitable, almost single-handedly.

    Of course, I believe it was improved upon greatly with Super SFIV, but still, the original version of SFIV did very much impact this gen strongly.

    #99 1 year ago
  100. DevilishSix

    In no particular order

    Minecraft – on how it changed they way many viewed what a game could be.

    COD Modern Warfare – on how it changed they way we played fps multiplayer at the time.

    Bioshock – for the thick atmosphere and mystery it created for a fps.

    Fallout 3 – for the incredible vision of post nuclear war world.

    Demon/Dark Souls – for bringing back the satisfaction that a challenging but fair game can give.

    Rayman Origins – for making 2d platforming feeling fresh again.

    There are a few more but that is a fair list. On a side note

    Kudos to the Walking Dead and Breaking Bad series for making me care about TV again.

    #100 1 year ago
  101. Dragon

    @91,
    That face :D

    #101 1 year ago

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