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Newly discovered glitch lets you play Zelda: Breath Of The Wild in first-person

Ever wanted to explore the world of Zelda: Breath Of The Wild's Hyrule from the perspective of its long-slumbering hero? Well, thanks to a new glitch, now you can!

Twitter user Axk_000 appears to have discovered a glitch that allows you to shift the game's perspective from the third-person viewpoint that has become so iconic into the game into a more intimate, first-person one (thanks Gamespot).

Better yet, if you want to try the glitch yourself, it appears like it's not that hard to pull off. All you need to do is pulling out the in-game camera, hold an item from the menu, and then cancel the item hold.

Immediately after that, the game shifts to a first-person view. Take a look at the glitch in action below.

From our own testing and what we've seen on social media since the glitch was discovered, the technique is fairly consistent – meaning you could commit to a run with this glitch in effect nearly constantly if you so wished.

Of course, it limits your situational awareness and viewpoint of the world quite significantly, meaning it'll make the game a lot harder in the long run. Still, if you've replayed the game a few times and you're looking for a reason to jump back in, this could be a good idea.

The discovery of this glitch follows on from the unearthing of the ability to add custom characters into The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild. If you are eager to head back into the world of Hyrule, you may want to check out our detailed The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild guide.

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The Legend of Zelda: Breath of the Wild

Nintendo Wii U, Nintendo Switch

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About the Author
Dom Peppiatt avatar

Dom Peppiatt

Editor-in-chief

Dom is a veteran video games critic with 11 years' experience in the games industry. A published author and consultant that has written for NME, Red Bull, Samsung, Xsolla, Daily Star, GamesRadar, Tech Radar, and many more. They also have a column about games and music at The Guardian.

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