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Sony warns of potential "eye fatigue or nausea" from 3D games

vomit

Everyone's going to be doing this in three years.

Sony's updated PlayStation's terms and conditions to warn that playing 3D games or viewing 3D content in general might give you mental eyes and make you throw up.

The note also recommends that you don't let children under the age of six view 3D material before consulting a doctor as their vision is "still under development".

Which all sounds highly convenient. So that's buying a new TV, buying some glasses, throwing up everywhere, going blind and ruining the lives of your small children: 3D, here we come.

Here's the new stuff:

"Some people may experience discomfort (such as eye strain, eye fatigue or nausea) while watching 3D video images or playing stereoscopic 3D games on 3D televisions. If you experience such discomfort, you should immediately discontinue use of your television until the discomfort subsides.

"SCEA recommends that all viewers take regular breaks while watching 3D video or playing stereoscopic 3D games. The length and frequency of necessary breaks may vary from person to person. Please take breaks that are long enough to allow any feelings of discomfort to subside. If symptoms persist, consult a doctor.

"The vision of young children (especially those under six years old) is still under development. SCEA recommends that you consult your doctor (such as a pediatrician or eye doctor) before allowing young children to watch 3D video images or play stereoscopic 3D games. Adults should supervise young children to ensure they follow the recommendations listed above."

Via Kokogamer and Joystiq.

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Patrick Garratt

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Patrick Garratt is a games media legend - and not just by reputation. He was named as such in the UK's 'Games Media Awards', the equivalent of a lifetime achievement award. After garnering experience on countless gaming magazines, he joined Eurogamer and later split from that brand to create VG247, putting the site on the map with fast, 24-hour a day coverage, and assembling the site's earliest editorial teams. He retired from VG247, and the games industry, in 2017.
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