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Russian authorities talk "possible ban" of violent games after Moscow shooting

The Russian government is looking into how violent games in the region are handled after a shooter, who just so happens to like playing videogames, killed six co-workers at the Rigla pharmaceutical warehouse.

It is said Dmitry Vinogradov's attack was spurred by a breakup with a female coworker, but authorities made note of his enjoyment of Rockstar's 2003 shooter, Manhunt.

However, it must also be noted that according to Moscow News, before the shooting, Vinogradov "had been drinking for five days and posted an extremely misanthropic manifesto on his social network account hours prior to the killing."

According to United Russia deputies Sergei Zheleznyak and Franz Klintsevich, an inquiry with the Russian Federal Surveillance Service for Mass Media and Communications will have to be conducted in order for Manhunt to be banned from the country.

Klintsevich told media outlets violent games should be restricted, while a chairman from the State Duma Committee on Education suggested a commission to supervise PC game sales should be formed.

Manhunt was blamed partially for the murder of Stefan Pakeerah by his friend Warren Leblanc in the UK, previously, before police publicly dismissed a link.

The game is banned in Australia, Germany, Ontario, and New Zealand.

Thanks, GI International.

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Stephany Nunneley-Jackson

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Stephany is VG247’s News Editor, with 22 years experience (with 15 of them at VG247). With a brain that lacks adhesive ducks, the ill-tempered, chaotic neutral fembot does her best to bring you the most interesting gaming news. She is also unofficially the site’s Lord of the Rings/Elder Scrolls Editor.
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