Splash Damage: Crunch time “inevitable”, but “respect for staff” is key

By Stace Harman, Tuesday, 26 July 2011 15:09 GMT

Paul Wedgwood, CEO of Brink developer Splash Damage, has told Edge that whilst the crunch period during development is all but inevitable, the key to a healthy studio is to do as much advanced planning as possible.

Speaking with Edge, Wedgwood said of the infamous period toward end of a development cycle: “There’s just no way of avoiding that; things just get forgotten,” he said. “We’re human, you know? We make mistakes.”

However, in comparison to comments made by Wedbush Morgan analyst Michael Pachter who said that bonuses offer compensation for the expected long hours, Wedgwood believes that crunch time should be planned for, and not taken for granted.

“Nailing the crunch problem is a real priority for Splash Damage, and getting to a point where, when we do overtime, it’s planned in advance and we’re able to compensate people appropriately for, in an ideal world, volunteering to do additional work. That’s the ultimate ideal goal.”

Crunch periods are not a new concept in the videogame industry, but the debate over them was reignited recently by ex-Team Bondi members who claimed that 100-hour working weeks during the development of LA Noire were common.

Sometimes we include links to online retail stores. If you click on one and make a purchase we may receive a small commission. For more information, go here.

Comments

Headlines

Brink

Crunch

  • Crunch time: More industry vets voice opinion on topic du jour

    More and more developers are offering opinions on the recent hot topic of the dreaded crunch time. While some contend that a certain amount of time spent crunching during a game’s development cycle is inevitable, all seem to agree it can be avoided if proper planning is implemented and adhered to from the start.

Michael Pachter