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Capcom wants to boost its diversity by promoting some female employees

Monday, 12th May 2014 13:00 GMT By Dave Cook

Capcom has pledged to increase its gender equality and internal diversity, starting with the promotion of females into executive roles.

Deep_down_ps4_1

It comes from Capcom’s own financial report, which reads:

“Capcom is fully recognising the importance of diversity of human resources in recent years while actively utilizing female workers and making evaluations according to performance and not based on gender, age and such.

“As part of such efforts, we are promoting executive positions of female employees, and so far we have two female corporate officers and 20 female employees in management positions such as general managers and senior managers.”

This might have something to do with the revelation that there are no playable females in PS4 exclusive Deep Down, which was followed by a heated blog our very own Brenna Hillier wrote on the matter to call the company out, among other things.

What do you make of the move?

Via CVG.

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11 Comments

  1. ManuOtaku

    So do like nintendo did with animal crossing new leaf development, this can work depending on how the implemented and the types of games that can maximize from this benefit.

    #1 4 months ago
  2. ManuOtaku

    So do like nintendo did with animal crossing new leaf development, this can work depending on how they will be implementing it, and the types of games that can maximize from this benefit.

    #2 4 months ago
  3. Obernox

    Maybe Brenna will calm down now….

    /Jk jk jk

    please don’t ban me…

    #3 4 months ago
  4. lexph3re

    YAY! Pity Promotions!

    #4 4 months ago
  5. Legendaryboss

    @ManuOtaku I heard you the first time!

    “This might have something to do with the revelation that there are no playable females in PS4 exclusive Deep Down, which was followed by a heated blog our very own Brenna Hillier wrote on the matter to call the company out, among other things.” Relight the fire – part two.

    #5 4 months ago
  6. PEYJ

    “… not based on gender, age and such.”

    “As part of such efforts, we are promoting executive positions of female employees,…”

    Hmmm…..

    #6 4 months ago
  7. ManuOtaku

    @Legendaryboss sorry for the double post, i was trying to correct it while posting it, oooppps.

    #7 4 months ago
  8. salarta

    @PEYJ I think this could be nothing more than the word “promoting” being a poor choice of word for what Capcom’s trying to convey. We’re used to the word “promoting” to mean that they’re giving certain people in the company higher positions within the company. Here, I think Capcom meant it in the sense that they’ll make people more aware of the female executives and managers the company already employs in those positions.

    Personally, I’d say even if they meant it the other way, I’d find that to be more important than the “not based on gender, age and such” remark. Think of how many racists out there spout how they’re not racist. A racist might claim they’re not judging employees based on their race, completely oblivious to how their racism makes them devalue the same or better qualities within a black person or other race while highly valuing them in a white person. Same goes for women. The simple fact of having at least some women in leadership positions is important for no other reason than including a female perspective regardless of any other traits, and it’s highly unlikely that in any modern organization there would be absolutely zero qualified women.

    Capcom’s behavior with Resident Evil shows they need female input badly. All the women since RE5 have been treated like they’re secondary to the men or their lives revolve around the men. Ada may be the sole exception, but that’s no excuse when Jill used to be her own woman and has since been turned into a plot device and accessory to Chris. Other Capcom franchises, meanwhile, put almost all the attention on men. The closest to not doing that is Street Fighter, but that’s not saying much. Remember Me’s been the only bright spot for Capcom as far as female representation as video game characters lately.

    #8 4 months ago
  9. PEYJ

    @salarta

    As for the first paragraph – you could be right but I highly doubt it.

    As for “Personally, I’d say even if they meant it the other way, I’d find that to be more important than the “not based on gender, age and such” remark. Think of how many racists out there spout how they’re not racist. A racist might claim they’re not judging employees based on their race, completely oblivious to how their racism makes them devalue the same or better qualities within a black person or other race while highly valuing them in a white person. Same goes for women. The simple fact of having at least some women in leadership positions is important for no other reason than including a female perspective regardless of any other traits, and it’s highly unlikely that in any modern organization there would be absolutely zero qualified women.”

    This is what I would call modern day State (or is the right word Government) feminism. Women (and other “minorities) are “as a fact” oppressed, thus they should be given special treatment. Those disagreeing with this stance represents racism and sexism.

    But we’ve been there before….

    #9 4 months ago
  10. PSOCecil

    I have a dream, that the worth of a person will be based not on their gender, or the color of the skin, but the content of their character.

    I seriously hope Capcom doesn’t mean “We’re giving promotions to women to promote a equal work place”, because that … doesn’t make sense. “We’re giving promotions to employees who deserve them.” is far better. The gender of these people doesn’t matter.

    #10 4 months ago
  11. salarta

    @PEYJ The portion you’re answering with regard to “state feminism” is a bit complicated. I wouldn’t say someone is racist purely for not wanting a woman or a person of race or ethnicity getting a spot in a company partly because they have that identity as an attempt to counterbalance inherent sexism and racism in our society. Suggesting someone in favor of those options would automatically consider opposing voices to be racists or sexists is going overboard. There might be people that believe that way, but it’s not true of everyone.

    However, I think such a position is needed in many contexts, especially with a video game company, and especially with Capcom as of late. They make video games, and these video games include female characters. It makes perfect sense that there should be a woman involved somewhere down the line to keep the company from screwing up things where having a woman’s input would be all that’s needed to set things right.

    #11 4 months ago

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