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Star Citizen passes $20M in funding – video shows off Hangar, ships, other shiny things

Thursday, 26th September 2013 20:15 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Star Citizen has passed the $20 million funding mark. Up next is the $21 million stretch goal which adds a salvage mechanic to the game. Meanwhile, the game has been given new video providing a 15 minute tour of the various ships and their sparkling paint jobs. Along with the Hangar updates, you get to see the amazing detail that has gone into each ship. The space sim is looking rather spiffy, obviously. Granted, it’s not an official video, but watch it below anyway, courtesy of YouTube fella Scott Manley. Star Citizen is slated for release on PC in late 2014. Thanks, PCgamesN.

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4 Comments

  1. TheWulf

    I wish I could get behind this but the antiquity of the ships would just irk me too much. I’ve never been a fan of fighter planes in space because it feels so archaic and devoid of any kind of imagination, it would also be really sad to think that we’ve come so far and yet achieved so little.

    I’d imagine that humanity would have a degree of morphological freedom (if you’re unfamiliar with this concept, then Down and Out in the Magic Kingdom by Cory Doctorow is a good place to start), so customisation would be important. Furthermore, by that point we should be using fully realised neural interfaces because we’re almost getting to that point all ready with modern day science. So by the time we can actually build a spaceship, we wouldn’t be controlling it with our hands due to there being much more efficient methods of control on offer.

    Come on, even Back to the Future 2 got that right. :P

    So I’d prefer in that case that they just don’t show me the pilot in the cockpit. I believe Freelancer just shows you the cockpit and not the pilot or joystick, and that would be way more enjoyable for me. I suppose I’m still waiting for a space game that would be more applicable to my interests, but this feels like a more homogeneous, easy to understand effort, much like past space games.

    Derp, people wouldn’t understand morphological freedom or neural interfaces, so let’s have a bald guy with a joystick.

    That makes me sad.

    So I can’t get into this one at all, honestly. It’s fine for people that like it and I’m happy for them, it’s just that they don’t have my particular perspective or understanding. Now that science (not fiction) has come so far, sci-fi really has to try harder. Honestly, I’d love a game set in anything written by Iain M. Banks.

    Oh how I’d love a game based upon his Culture books. You have no idea.

    Edit: It hadn’t occurred to me until just now, but if anyone feels the same way that I do, I have to recommend Nowhere to them. It’s not exactly a space exploration game, but it is something sort of along those lines and it is incredibly neat.

    #1 11 months ago
  2. Lukewarm

    If you want really realistic ships, you would have no ships but drones and an AI that does the job for you. THAT would be realistic. Putting people into space ships that fly at speeds that allow space combat, already is a big stretch. And these space ships need wings, because they fly in atmospheres as well. Yeah, right, just throw in artificial gravitation. But (all) such devices can fail, no matter how much redundancy you implement, and in such a case you will wish that you are in plane flying in the air, and not in a sphere falling to the ground. Apart from that you will prefer wings to carry weapons systems and other devices, to emit the heat your engines produces (and no science magic solves that problem because even the most efficient processes always emit a critical amount of heat) and to give you an advantage in dogfights. Imagine a bad guy on your tail, who has to shoot on a flat ship instead of sphere (that gives the same target in all directions) or so.

    Star Citizen is a space simulation. It has to simulate all the little aspects like your hands on the flight sticks. That’s a crucial element of the genre and something that space-sim audience expects. If you want to play “Crysis in space”, wait for the “Freelancer-remake” based on Star Citizen. Besides, I have my doubts that a fighter jock would work with an interface, that makes his own ship invisible for him.

    By the way, science fiction is not about “Hey, look at my smartphone. The next “Star Trek” needs smartphones that are directly installed into your brain, or it becomes ridiculous!”. Science fiction isn’t an extrapolation of todays technology either. It’s about how society interacts with fictional technology and deals with the implications for the society that come with that technology. Christopher Nolan’s “The Prestige”, set in the Victorian times, actually has very distinct science fiction elements.

    P.S.: And “Star Citizen” is designed as space opera a’la “Star Wars”. That makes a huge difference.

    #2 11 months ago
  3. TheWulf

    Well. That was a pile of ragespew from some stranger who didn’t even comprehend where I was coming from.

    I’m not saying I want realistic sci-fi, guy. That’s something you cooked up. No. If you’d do me the honour of paying attention, I’m saying I’d quite like interesting sci-fi — as opposed to the same old, same old that we’ve been exposed to. I have the same aversion to that that I have to overly troped and familiar fantasy settings.

    The reason I name-dropped Iain M. Banks (which is a name that any self-respecting sci-fi fan should recognise) is because he brings a refreshing take to a tired, old genre. He has his own ideas about how things should work, which is more than you could say for most. Whereas Star Citizen comes across as a work of grand self-imitation (Wing Commander et al) with no character of its own, the Culture represents a new direction for science-fiction.

    So let’s touch upon a few parts of the ragespew for amusement’s sake.

    If you want really realistic ships, you would have no ships but drones and an AI that does the job for you. THAT would be realistic. Putting people into space ships that fly at speeds that allow space combat, already is a big stretch.

    Where did I even say that I wanted pilots in fighter ships? Did I not write neural interface enough? You could have a mothership where AI and biological pilots coordinate to do this, after all. I see absolutely no problem with that.

    And these space ships need wings, because they fly in atmospheres as well.

    what an incredibly antiquated way of looking at things. When new technologies become standard, wings become archaic and quaint. You then go on to make an assumption that any technology other than wings would naturally fail.

    Well, I guess helicopters are fucked, then.

    All I hear from you though is that you want to make lazy excuses to support your dire need for perceived old-school realism (fighter planes in space). Except what’s real now and what’s real in the future are two different things. Ultimately, you’re showing a remarkable lack of imagination and foresight.

    Star Citizen is a space simulation. It has to simulate all the little aspects like your hands on the flight sticks.

    Whut? I’m sorry, but what are you even trying to say, here? So, if the pilot wants to fap because they’re bored in the middle of a space flight, should we emulate that, too? Including the ejaculation?

    I’m sorry, you’re just coming up with utterly cockamamie reasons to justify your love of fighter planes in space, which is boring to me. You love the comfort of it, the familiarity of a fighter plane. So you’re going to defend that familiarity, that’s fine. But I find it completely mundane and boring, and not at all representative of a good sci-fi. We each have our opinions, though I’d venture to say that mine are less based in ‘let’s include this archaic, quaint element in sci-fi because the familiarity makes me more comfortable with it.

    Good grief. Even arguing about that is giving me flashbacks of Riker’s joystick from Star Trek: Insurrection. Are you one of those people who genuinely thought that was a good idea? Please tell me you’re not. You are… aren’t you?

    But yes, you just have this thing for taking fighter planes into space. You want a realistic fighter plane simulation, in space. But hey, maybe I’m wrong.

    [...] dogfights.

    Nope. Not wrong.

    By the way, science fiction is not about “Hey, look at my smartphone. The next “Star Trek” needs smartphones that are directly installed into your brain, or it becomes ridiculous!”.

    Nor did I ever say that. Reading comprehension isn’t your thing, is it?

    What you first need to understand before we can continue this conversation is that science is imagination. You sound like a more mundane-minded engineer rather than a theorist, so you only see things that have been done, rather than things that could be done. You have no ability for creativity and conception, for imagining things which don’t quite exist yet. Scientists, however, have to do this on a day to day basis.

    Science-Fiction deals with a similar idea. It’s anything that could happen within the realm of future science. As such, we can look at current science to get new and interesting ideas, rather than sticking with ancient, overly troped ideas like fighter planes in space. That’s been done so often that it’s purely a cliché at this point.

    So instead of just imitating quaint, troped sci-fi, you could look at what science is doing and be creative. You could extrapolate new, interesting, and clever ideas for your audience to consume. It doesn’t have to be exactly the same thing time and time again. It doesn’t always have to be fighter planes in space. To even think it does is just a mundane mind’s base need for familiarity.

    You’re just a boring person, it’s that simple. I’m sorry.

    You like familiar things, clichés, ’60s sci-fi involving fighter planes having dog fights in space. Yes, we’ve been there and done that about ten billion times, now. I think it’s about time to try new and interesting ideas based upon current science rather than ’60s science.

    You’re stuck in the past, as an outmoded, quaint creature. I, on the other hand, am not. The sad part is that I’m probably older than you, too.

    Christopher Nolan’s “The Prestige”, set in the Victorian times, actually has very distinct science fiction elements.

    And that’s actually a good thing because it’s not fighter planes in space for the billionth time. However, this actually supports my point more than it does yours. Which is probably infuriating for you.

    P.S.: And “Star Citizen” is designed as space opera à la “Star Wars”. That makes a huge difference.

    I didn’t say it wasn’t. I just mourn that we’re getting another one of these instead of something actually novel, new, and thus, fun.

    #3 11 months ago
  4. Uncontested

    The only boring person here is you Wulf. Jesus wall of text. Also, you’re a douche.

    #4 11 months ago

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