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Xbox One always-online backlash “surprised” Microsoft, says Penello

Thursday, 5th September 2013 20:35 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Microsoft’s director of product planning, Albert Penello, has said if he were to go back and “redo one thing” pertaining to the Xbox One reveal, it would have been not to introduce the “always online” functionality to consumers so early in the current market.

Speaking with Rev3Games (thanks, Gamasutra), Penello said eventually such a function will become more accepted with consumers but further into the future.

“I think with time, people have understood what we were trying to do, and I’m sure you’ve seen it with the fans,” he said. “They’ve been saying ‘God, I wish some of this stuff would come back.’ I think the problem was that people got in their minds that what we were trying to do was somehow evil or anti-customer.

“We were looking at what Steam does, we were looking at what iOS is doing, we were looking where the customers were going and saying ‘I think we can actually give you a better all-digital experience.’”

Penello said eventually discs will leave the market, and if anything, Microsoft thought “it was gonna happen sooner than the customer thought it was going to happen.”

“We took a hard stance on it, and I think some customers were like, ‘Yeah I’m in!’, and other customers were like ‘Whoa whoa whoa, what about my situation.’ We were surprised at how vocal it was, and we were surprised at the reaction and assumptions that people had about what we were trying to do.”

Penello said he’s like to see incentives such as family sharing, and other items dropped along with the always-online come back in the future, a sentiment he shared with Gamespot recently as well.

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69 Comments

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  1. JewyMcJew

    Ironically, MS’s policies were ridiculously generous! Imagine being able to instantly share your games with 10 friends (er, I mean family).

    You don’t have to drive over to hand a game. You don’t have to get it back. You just have instant access. I can’t believe the publishers were cool with that!

    Hopefully MS will bring it all back but for downloads only.

    #1 11 months ago
  2. viralshag

    I was surprised too.

    #2 11 months ago
  3. Dark

    That just shows how out of touch Microsoft is.

    #3 11 months ago
  4. Lengendaryboss

    The comments on N4G are starting to resemble the comment section here, interesting.

    #4 11 months ago
  5. zinc

    “We were really surprised that when we handed the internet a bag full of shit, they went onto full rage mode instead of waiting for our golden nuggets…”

    #5 11 months ago
  6. Hcw87

    @4
    Full of retards throwing around the famous overused ”40% percent more power!” remark. Getting old fast.

    #6 11 months ago
  7. Eregol

    So, they were really surprised that people with no Internet or patchy Internet were angry at their ‘always online’ stance.
    Shows ow out of touch they are. Do we need to break out the #dealwithit again?

    #7 11 months ago
  8. sebastien rivas

    It is fairly easy to say people’s mind change when the revamped feature is not stated point by point.
    Also it spund like Penello just got the news from the janitor at MS corp.
    Again ot is an extremely loose statement with empty air.
    What am I suppose say?
    Ho yeahhh alwaus online, bring it on, i miss it?
    Seriously, can’t drive me with so little in hand…

    #8 11 months ago
  9. Lengendaryboss

    @6
    Not yet but i was referring to 3/7.

    @5
    LOL Thats a new remark i haven’t come across yet :P

    #9 11 months ago
  10. Djoenz

    Well played Penello well played.

    #10 11 months ago
  11. laughing-gravy

    You can already share digital purchases with five other consoles on PSN. It’s nothing new. Removing the basic consumer right of ownership over physical copies was the bone of contention, that and being able to trade your discs at retail with no restrictions. Can’t say that I agree with having to check in once every 24 hours like I’m on probation either.

    #11 11 months ago
  12. pcbros

    @7 – “they were really surprised that people with no Internet or patchy Internet were angry at their ‘always online’ stance.”

    I personally would like to know what percentage of Xbox owners have no internet (besides military). It just seems the majority of these systems features require online. It’s like having an iPhone and complaining about the required data plan.

    Either way, it’s great that people have the option now to buy online or go to GameStop and buy their games. I think however that Microsoft should attract people to the DRM darkside. For example, make every game $50 (instead of $60) and have early digital releases.

    EDIT: @11 – “You can already share digital purchases with five other consoles on PSN. It’s nothing new.”

    So if someone owns a digital PS3 title, his friend in a different city “borrow” and play that game? I never heard about this feature. Sounds good though.

    “Removing the basic consumer right of ownership over physical copies was the bone of contention, that and being able to trade your discs at retail with no restrictions.”

    I just wonder how PC gamers and mobile gamers were able to make the leap to online DRM without all the complaining. Seriously, no one complains they can’t trade in their Steam or App Store purchases at GameStop :P

    #12 11 months ago
  13. bradk825

    The idea of going digital eventually isn’t what bothered people, it was going half-way to digital by taking the DRM off the disc while still offering the disc. It made no sense, if we don’t want to switch the disc we can buy the digital version.

    I see where they were going a little bit, get people used to not switching discs, but they did it all wrong.

    #13 11 months ago
  14. laughing-gravy

    @12 Didn’t MSoft recently say that they had something like 40 million Live gold accounts? Then there is an install base of almost 80 million. So around 50%.

    #14 11 months ago
  15. pcbros

    @14 – Gold accounts… you forgot all the Silver accounts :)

    #15 11 months ago
  16. Lengendaryboss

    @14
    Maybe those people had internet but didn’t bother paying up?

    #16 11 months ago
  17. laughing-gravy

    @15 Will there be silver accounts on Xbox one? Or will it be come one, come all.

    #17 11 months ago
  18. laughing-gravy

    @16 Possibly but a lot of functionality is behind the gold paywall for next gen.

    #18 11 months ago
  19. Eregol

    @12 I’m all for a digital future, but it has to be priced right. If you create a digital only space then YOU (read the platform holder/publishers) set the price and you can guarantee that the likes of EA and Activision would wring out every last cent.

    Whereas this way, the onus is now on them to make digital attractive by offering attractive pricing. We know we can’t digitally trade games (yet), so, give us a reason to buy digital rather than forcing it on us, as they were going to.

    #19 11 months ago
  20. pcbros

    Do any of these next-gen consoles still support A/V cables (Red, White, Yellow)? If not, shouldn’t we also complain about that? lol

    @19 – I agree. Previously, buying games online was a joke. Games that you can buy at Amazon for less than $20 were still $40-$60 at the Games On Demand store.

    #20 11 months ago
  21. laughing-gravy

    Whatever is going on in Redmond someone in their PR dept needs a serious nut-whacking. Give us clear and concise messaging and we might just understand what you’re trying to say.

    #21 11 months ago
  22. sebastien rivas

    @20
    Maybe you should if your tv only accept those

    #22 11 months ago
  23. sebastien rivas

    @21
    This a scheme to help propel consumer’s mind and direction.

    Much like a majority of comments that lead to an understanding without evrr any substance.

    Simply said, I am against always online for solo games. It is bullshit let me make sure you are who you say you are. I don’t need a MS agent in my livong room to check onto how/when/where/why I play my solo game that I purchased.

    But again, nothing is certain because pennello talks to us through his janitor at MS corp. Nobody knows what MS want to bring on the table, is it the same always on as defined before the clash, is it something revamped and in what terms.
    Nothong against an always on but agaon as I have stated before, there is the art and there is the manner, will MS fonally umderstand???
    Sorry for all the typo, am typing from my cel…
    Cheer everyone

    #23 11 months ago
  24. CyberMarco

    @laughing-gravy + pcbros

    Regarding the PSN digital games sharing, it was indeed up to 5 until the PSN breach back in 2011(?). Now Sony restricted the consoles down to 2.

    Personally it’s not that bad since I can split my PS+ sub with my brother and share the whole library! :)

    #24 11 months ago
  25. laughing-gravy

    @24 Ah didn’t know that, cheers!

    #25 11 months ago
  26. pcbros

    @23 – I’m up for whatever helps against piracy and helps developers earn their profits. Trading in games at GameStop for $30, just so they can resell it at $55 is ridiculous.

    I just hope Sony and Microsoft do a better job at promoting digital sales.

    #26 11 months ago
  27. laughing-gravy

    @23 Yeah I like persistent world games too. But I also want to own whatever I hand my money over for as well. So I know where you are coming from. There has been a lot left out in everything they’ve said. I do worry about the fact that all the bad stuff will come back as well.

    #27 11 months ago
  28. lookingglass

    Surprised me too. I didn’t know 90% of PS4 users cannot afford Internet. That’s why they went with a lower console price.

    It’s nice to know I’m one of only 100 people in the world who have wi-fi at their house that’s always on. My consoles have built in wi-fi too unlike most PS3s or Xbox 360s, so when I turn them on, they auto connect.

    I really think wi-fi is going to be huge in the future once the Internet becomes mainstream and when computers finally cost less than 10,000£.

    #28 11 months ago
  29. Lengendaryboss

    @28
    Troll elsewhere no-one needs to read your trollish “facts”

    #29 11 months ago
  30. CyberMarco

    @29

    Nah-ah-ah! Legendary, remember first rule of TrollClub is, do not feed the trolls! (cit.) :P

    #30 11 months ago
  31. laughing-gravy

    @12 I don’t game on PC. It’s completely irrelevant to me. At least on PC you get a choice of vendor, GoG regularly does DRM free sales etc. You don’t get that choice on closed systems like a console.
    EDIT: typo.
    App store purchases are very different. You’re talking throw away prices. A full price game is a different matter.

    #31 11 months ago
  32. Lengendaryboss

    @30
    Well played :D

    #32 11 months ago
  33. Joe Musashi

    @ Article: “..if he were to go back and “redo one thing” pertaining to the Xbox One reveal, it would have been not to introduce the “always online” functionality..”

    The Adam Orth Twitter incident should have told you something, Microsoft. Did you really think shooting the messenger was the answer?

    JM

    #33 11 months ago
  34. Major Mayhem 70

    @Those that actually think that moving your account around on different PS 3 consoles equals Family Sharing. YOU STILL DON’T GET THE WHOLE FAMILY SHARING IDEA!!!

    #34 11 months ago
  35. pcbros

    @31 – Never tried GoG. The problem with DRM free sales, from my understanding, is that they are not attached to an account. So if your hard drive fails and you loose your games, you can’t just sign into your account and redownload them.

    I could be wrong though…

    #35 11 months ago
  36. Lengendaryboss

    @34
    And whose fault is that?

    #36 11 months ago
  37. laughing-gravy

    Wtf! can’t post any more!
    EDIT: Problem sorted.
    @35 You could always make multiple back-ups because of lack of DRM.

    #37 11 months ago
  38. Major Mayhem 70

    “Albert Penello, has said if he were to go back and “redo one thing” pertaining to the Xbox One reveal, it would have been not to introduce the “always online” functionality to consumers so early in the current market.”

    “So early” is what stands out to me. I’ve always said their policies will be revisited. I for one welcome this. For someone who is getting both consoles why would I want them to be so similar. I have that now with this generation. Not everyone can purchase both and that’s understandable. A decisions as to which one to buy has to be made. This is where the $100 price point becomes a factor for those on the fence. Truth is I would have still paid an extra $100 because MS was pushing something different. Still rooting for them to bring back some of the ideas they flipped on… And they will and we all know they will.
    I’m Major Mayhem and I stand by that statement. 😛

    #38 11 months ago
  39. pcbros

    @37 – The only downside with something like Steam is… if Steam goes away (I doubt it will), I could possible lose all my games.

    Hopefully if Steam ever gets into trouble, they will somehow “release” the games :)

    #39 11 months ago
  40. laughing-gravy

    @39 That’s a serious bummer! I’m glad I don’t buy from them.

    #40 11 months ago
  41. Major Mayhem 70

    @legendary
    I can’t help that people don’t shut up and listen. I understood what was being said during the unvail and E3. It really doesn’t matter. MS will still bring back most of what it wanted to bring in the first place. Look at the recent articles on the X1 and listen to how they talk about it.
    “Albert Penello, has said pertaining to the Xbox One reveal, it would have been not to introduce the “always online” functionality to consumers so early in the current market.”

    “So early” Oh yeah, it’s coming back and they’re even telling you it is in so many words.

    #41 11 months ago
  42. pcbros

    @40 – But they offer a great service. You can chat, invite friends to games, etc. It’s like Xbox Live for the PC. I really enjoy it and I feel it helped PC gaming a lot.

    #42 11 months ago
  43. laughing-gravy

    @42 All down to personal preference I suppose. But surely they would have to release the games though if something bad happened?(doubtful). Wouldn’t there be legislation forcing them to?

    #43 11 months ago
  44. Lengendaryboss

    @41
    That doesn’t answer my question, whose fault was it? You can’t blame the customer, you can only blame MS for their missteps. Blaming it on “people (That) don’t shut up and listen” is stupid, MS is supposed to market and message their product clearly, if some (small minority) understand and others don’t (large minority) doesn’t really give either group the right to pull rank. The people listened otherwise they wouldn’t have heard anything and as for shutting up its call freedom of speech “Deal with it”.

    Whether you understood, or can’t help about others is irrelevant.

    MS was in control of the details, they should have shut up when they were being arrogant, blaming the customer is never the solution.

    #44 11 months ago
  45. pcbros

    “Penello said eventually discs will leave the market”

    I’ve always said that discs will go the way of cartridges. Hard drives on consoles keep getting bigger (you can even add storage on the PS4) and it’s not to store save games ;)

    We are slowly but surely being prepped for the big disc departure.

    #45 11 months ago
  46. mark_t50

    Yet another example of someone in the games industry that for some strange reason seems obsessed with killing off the physical disc, and I have to wonder why ?

    Did the Kindle kill off the physical book ? No.
    Did the iPod kill off the physical CD ? No.
    Did Netflix kill off the physical DVD ? No.

    Why the heck are people hellbent on killing it off when it comes to gaming ? Is it really so hard to just offer both a physical and digital version of a game as two completely separate things and leave it up to the customer to choose what they like ?

    I’m all for a digital future, I just don’t see why it has to come at the expense of killing off a physical alternative that will just upset people, especially when there are so many precedents in other sectors of the entertainment industry that show there is no need to do this and that physical and digital can co-exist quite happily.

    #46 11 months ago
  47. the dog

    Man, anyone who doesn’t like steam either doesn’t have a good internet connection (“hand raised” dsl, and it sucks. Just an Ipod slows ours down making any internet play hard) or is just plain loco. I’ve saved soooo much money buying games on steam sales.
    If steam ever goes away, it will be a long time down the road. They are so popular, not to mention rich.
    Nope, can’t see it happening. Many years down the line, your grandkids will still be downloading off steam (just a whole lot faster).

    #47 11 months ago
  48. bobnice

    Lets not forget they were going to impliment a system for trading in digital games. And they were also going to have physical disks supported to, these disks would install to the hard drive much like a pc game, once installed it would link to your account and you would also then own the rights to the digital version counterpart on the marketplace…just like steam powered disk games. They ultimately were going to compete with steam by adding more benefits. I liked this model much better where I could own the disk and digital version with one purchase.

    #48 11 months ago
  49. pcbros

    @47 – Steam brought me back to pc gaming :)

    #49 11 months ago
  50. sebastien rivas

    @48

    This trading feature sounds interesting.

    #50 11 months ago
  51. xbrn07x

    The thing that is never mentioned about this all digital future is not that people dont have internet or broadband its that alot of us are dealing with data caps imposed on us by our ISPs. I have a 250GB cap per month, now while that sounds like alot when you start downloading a few 10-15 GB games from Steam, PSN or XBL combined with some Netflix usage and its pretty easy to find yourself capped out.

    This digital future dream has really caught on since everyone saw how quickly the music industry has changed into a digital format. I cant even tell you the last time I bought an actual CD. But the reason it has caught on so fast is because music files are small and you can store quite a few of them on even a modest smartphone. Games/Movies are huge. I have thousands of tracks of music on my computer and they still combined are a fraction of the total data stored on my hard drives.

    I’m not really worried about pricing, the market will adjust itself accordingly. People are not just going to shell out $60 a game because they have no choice anymore to buy it used at Gamestop. Alot of people just wont buy or buy as much. They will have to do something to create sales when they don’t have the piracy/used games crutch to fall back on anymore.

    #51 11 months ago
  52. zeen

    No dime from me to M$ after they are doing this to my all-digital experience on PC. “Games for Windows Live will be discontinued on July 1, 2014. The service will remain 100% operational until July 1, 2014 when the server will shut down.” Money down the toilet.

    #52 11 months ago
  53. Pitts

    That’s one big reason I don’t want an Xbox One: the way MS condescendingly treats its would-be customers. I guess I’m old school like that. I work hard for my money and arrogance is not the way to charm me out of a few bucks.

    There are certainly games I’d like to play on the new box, but I can’t bring myself to give them any cash for what has been and continues to be MS’s petulant, petty, and passive aggressive treatment of the people whose wallets they dream of emptying.

    #53 11 months ago
  54. sebastien rivas

    @53
    I hear you, I hear you well. It is not the first article from a MS employee pointing fingers at gamers and stating it is the gamers’ fault while all gamers did was in their outrage being just honest and wanting best for MS through not tolerating decisions that would not pertain to gamers to the gamers’ perception as well as stating outloud here and there gamers are ready to buy MS but MS should stop their BS, as BS feature points were indicated by gamers.

    I for one stated many time I could not afford an Xbox 1 and yet I was fairly ready to to pre-order one in next several days but after Pennello, then NO thanks it goes back to square one, wait and see what is Xbox 1 about and remain throughout what I wish and hope for MS, a happy and long life cycle.

    #54 11 months ago
  55. Major Mayhem 70

    You right Legendary. The pr was piss poor. MS admitted it. And we can stay on this all day. Doesn’t change the inevitable. I guess I saw past all the poor PR cause I read about technology other than video games. Tech analysts have been saying that disk formats have their days numbered. Just like Past formats before the disk ( cassettes, floppies, VHS tapes etc)
    People think its about “killing off disks” that’s not what the “intention is” but rather the “result of” moving forward. Its not like disks will vanish over night. It is a gradual process that has essentially begun years ago. Those that can’t recognize that have had their head in the sand for quite some time now. Digital isn’t tomorrow, its now. Music sales prove it, video rentals prove it, book sales are proving it but video games is somehow exempt from it? I don’t think so. No, I take that back. I know its not. I said this before and I’ll say it again. Many didn’t like MS plan cause they didn’t understand it and they felt that something was being “pushed” past them. This time MS and Sony will “slide” it past you.

    #55 11 months ago
  56. pcbros

    After reading this article, I fail to see how Microsoft is blaiming gamers.

    They merely said that some people didn’t fully understand what they were trying to do. In other words, they didn’t share the same vision. I don’t see the arrogance.

    Btw, they just aired the first XB1 commercial during the NFL pre-game show. Quite nice I must say.

    #56 11 months ago
  57. sebastien rivas

    @56
    true, true, I apologize after re-reading the article. I understand he merely stated an obvious emtional reaction and not targetting players.

    Going to edit my own post,
    Thanks a bunch!

    #57 11 months ago
  58. bobnice

    Oh and the 15 – 30 gb install was not a problem. Because the xbox one had a 500gb storage and it also had unlimited storage with the cloud, and games could also be stored in the cloud.

    #58 11 months ago
  59. pcbros

    @57 – No problem ;)

    #59 11 months ago
  60. Tormenter

    STOP PRESS.

    MS customers say they are surprised at Penillo’s surprise over Xbox One always-online ‘blacklash’.

    Albert Penello, has said if he were to go back and “redo one thing” pertaining to the Xbox One reveal, it would have been not to introduce the “always online” functionality to consumers so early in the current market…. IN OTHER WORDS HE WOULD HAVE HID THIS FACT FROM THE CUSTOMERS.. Yeah, that’s what’s called a DICK MOVE, mate.

    #60 11 months ago
  61. battletrax

    @51 – That sucks that you have a monthly bandwith cap. Is there no other ISP near you? I live in Texas and I have Time Warner Cable. So far they made no mention of adding a bandwith cap in the future.

    #61 11 months ago
  62. Phoenixblight

    @61

    Yes they have multiple times in fact but the politicians have blocked them every time.

    http://news.cnet.com/8301-13506_3-57387445-17/time-warner-cable-tries-to-cap-broadband-data-usage-again/

    #62 11 months ago
  63. redwood

    don’t worry guys.. 3 years from now, 80% of the marekt will be held by games that are Mp only :) . than you wont have any option to
    stay always-online :P

    #63 11 months ago
  64. Metroid455

    @55 Then what does that make me? I have a MASSIVE CD collection that’s still growing and and a large bookshelf meant for a small library with all my games, including the soundtracks, art books and all the other goodies that a digital experience can’t hope to match and im PROUD of this collection, granted here in Japan is one of the few places on earth where the CD is still very popular.

    There’s no way in hell im giving this up for digital-only. to compliment physical im fine with but not to replace. The day we go digital only for games is the day I get off the train and just replay what I currently own..

    I know im sounding like an old fossil im not I promise( im only 25 lol) I love technology im just not big on this side of it, I guess that makes me outdated after all (^-^)

    #64 11 months ago
  65. Vice

    Not early, not late, nor ever.

    #65 11 months ago
  66. NeutralBlade

    In my opinion, the introduction of 4k resolution devices, seem to alter the reality of “all digital” consoles in 8 – 10 years. M&S’ consoles are not going to release at anything less than 4k, and 4k games are going to be considerably bigger than the games that will be released in this upcoming gen.

    Sony plans to release a 300GB Blu-ray disk to support next-gen disc players, while the consumers’ ISP bandwidth limits are not going to change much to support the considerably higher download requirements for said 4k games and movies. So the question then becomes, “Who’s going to pay for all that bandwidth?”

    If corps like Microsoft use the excuse that games are too big now, so everything goes and stays in the cloud, then the entire market then becomes a rental service at full purchase-price rates. And if everything is in the cloud, standard games will then have considerably shorter lifespans, because who’s going to pay for all the server upkeep costs to host these games?

    Digital sales for music make sense, because the file sizes are small. But as technology advances for games and movies, it’s going to be costly for both the consumer and corporations, to maintain that “all digital” payload. All digital for such formats only make sense as long as the file requirements don’t change much from what they currently are.

    But we all know that’s not going to happen, and the 4k future that’s coming, would be cheaper for both the consumer and corps, by keeping things mostly the old fashioned way; via physical disk, while also offering digital solutions. In a dream world where everyone has 1Gbp/s internet without bandwidth limits, do I see anything remotely similar to what they’ve been discussing; anything less than that reality, means the consumer will lose ownership rights and other features, while paying a higher price for console gaming.

    To speak on the article, the vast majority who were complaining about the lost of family sharing, took the announcement at face value, without considering all the fine print that was going to come with it. Microsoft wasn’t going to allow a massive loophole, that would allow people to group together and get several free games. For example, people were immediately assuming, that if they get 10 friends and family together, each buy a game, than they would essentially buy one game, and get nine others for free; worming their way around the game usage restrictions, assuming what was told would be no problem to beat if people took turns gaming. Sorry, but MS isn’t an idiot in this particular case, and that reality simply wasn’t going to happen; nor was it intended as such.

    That feature as most viewed it, would end up taking more money away from developers and publishers than the used game market would; because if people can pool their money together and share their games, that would mean considerably less people would buy new copies of said games.

    Moving to a close, what Microsoft was doing, was to their and other corps’ benefit completely, which is why I and others did their part to derail it. Corps like Microsoft are dishonest, and will say and do anything to deceive the consumer, in order to boost profits. Steam is a different beast with a considerably cheaper retail strategy than the console market. Microsoft’s vision was essentially the cons of Steam, piled on with a lot more cons for traditional gaming as the consumer currently knows it.

    For me, I don’t give a damn how much I like a certain gaming franchise. I’m not going to give up my rights, (nor sell my gamer soul), just to be screwed over by some execs that want to ruin what I enjoy for profit. Greed will destroy this market, and if it was up to Microsoft, they would be leading our favorite hobby, down that path of no return.

    #66 11 months ago
  67. salarta

    People got in their minds that what Microsoft wanted to do was anti-consumer because what Microsoft wanted to do WAS anti-consumer.

    Buy a physical copy of a game where the disc becomes useless afterward AND you aren’t allowed to play it if you don’t check in every 24 hours? Really?

    Nobody likes always-online. Nobody. It’s an unnecessary limitation that risks either cutting off the game mid-play (Assassin’s Creed II before that was fixed) or keeping players from being able to play what they paid good money for just because they haven’t gone online in a short time frame. It doesn’t matter how reliable your internet connection is, there is ALWAYS the risk of losing it.

    Physical media to use with games is never going to go away. Never. It’ll diminish, yes, but there will always be a strong contingent of people that would prefer a physical object, and there will always be companies that cater to that desire. Collector’s Editions of games exist for a reason, and it’s not because nobody wants physical versions of their games.

    Microsoft is trying to spin this as something other than tactics fueled by corporate greed and trying to get away with what they can out of consumers. The system was designed to basically force consumers to buy digital and punish them if they didn’t, because digital-only benefits Microsoft. It means they don’t have to pay for the Blu-Ray functionality in the future with their next console (or, more likely, a different version of XBox One that’s stripped down to be more affordable). It also means that Microsoft will get more money out of the games they publish, since they won’t have to pay for manufacturing, shipping, etc of physical media. And most of all, it means Microsoft gets to effectively kill the rental and used games markets.

    That doesn’t mean all of the ideas Microsoft had were bad. If it was a digital download, then the ability to trade or sell the digital download game is a good idea. The family plan is also a good idea. And since a digital download game is only online, it would be easy to restrict access by number of XBox Ones with access; if it reaches a limit, you can’t download until it’s taken off a machine or two.

    It’s the restrictions of forcing people to check in every 24 hours (or every hour at a friend’s machine) and applying completely unnecessary restrictions to physical media that they did wrong. And it took them months to finally reverse track, even though it looks like they still want to pretend they have no clue why those two things are so bad.

    #67 11 months ago
  68. Major Mayhem 70

    Damn, some of these comments were long. See you on the digital side .

    #68 11 months ago
  69. devilmingy

    Oh, Microsoft. I love how you can still insult me and make me think less of your brand even after the fiasco has ended. The fact that they’re still so bitter about this shift after a couple of months isn’t doing much to squash conspiracy theories that they’ll implement this stuff back in at a later date.

    Especially when the article begins with “We don’t regret the always-online DRM; we merely regret telling you about it before you preordered”.

    #69 11 months ago