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“Nobody cares” about loss of physical media, says Désilets

Thursday, 27th June 2013 22:45 GMT By Brenna Hillier

Assassin’s Creed creator Patrice Déstilets has said a digital-only future is inevitable, and “there’s nothing you can do about it”.

Speaking to GamesIndustry, the former Ubisoft Montreal and THQ Montreal leader seemed to suggest compared the backlash over Microsoft’s Xbox One policies to another digital revolution.

“Yeah, games come on disc, and I get it guys you were really pissed off,” he said. “But, deep down, nobody cares about not having CDs any more.

“The future is digital, and there’s nothing you can do about it.”

Désilets said that “the future is digital all the way” and that because if this”eventually AAA will make money again”.

“Right now we are at a crossroads in our industry, but I don’t believe the AAA blockbuster will die,” he said.

“Maybe the way it is distributed will change, but it won’t die.”

Désilets parted ways with Ubisoft – again – after his new studio was purchased in the wake of THQ’s collapse. He doesn’t seem very pleased about it and is fighting for control of his project 1666: Amsterdam.

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66 Comments

  1. MidlifeAxe

    Uh oh.

    #1 2 years ago
  2. FrankWhite

    It is true, i don’t give a damn about physical formats. I don’t buy used games, I buy new to support developers. The problem with the xbox was the 24 hour online requirement, not the digital distribution.

    digital distribution is inevitable, just don’t dick me around with DRM for MY digital content.

    #2 2 years ago
  3. BD

    He’s right.

    The problem is the terms of agreement. The contract between the consumer and the content provider.

    Microsoft’s agreement was to say “Bend over, I’m going in raw”.

    Perhaps with a better agreement, we can finally go fully digital.

    #3 2 years ago
  4. Cobra951

    The backlash was not so much about going digital as it was about losing the freedom to use one’s own purchases without online intrusion. The current Xbox excels at digital distribution, for both digital originals (XBLA) and disc-less images of retail games (GoD). All of these are playable without having to ask permission online. The system works as a whole without needing to ask daily permission to use it. I have a combination of disc games, GoD releases and XBLA releases. I know the pros and cons of the different distribution methods, and they are all acceptable, at different price points. For $60, I expect physical goods–a box and a disc, minimum. I’m happy to give up some tangible ownership for a significantly lower price. But not my ability to play independently of any mothership. That I will continue to demand for the foreseeable future.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. DSB

    Well duh. Good bye and good riddens to plastic and glass discs.

    But I do think we all have quite a bit to say in terms of how we want our digital goods.

    @3 I think it’s a case of technology outpacing legislation. I mean in Europe we already have pretty clear laws that would absolutely void the agreements of many digital distributors out there.

    We just haven’t really applied or tested them in the digital space yet.

    It’s just a question of someone getting pissed, calling a lawyer, and getting that settled. First you have the lawsuits, and then you get your changes to the TOS.

    #5 2 years ago
  6. WENDiGO

    We know digital is the future, we’ve already started to adapt to other things like E-books instead of using a physical book. The problem is how digital is being forced on us instead of letting the transition happen naturally. Let it happen naturally and the future will definitely be embraced…WHEN IT GETS HERE!

    #6 2 years ago
  7. salarta

    Aaaaaaaaaand Desilets is wrong.

    He deserves to get his IP back from Ubisoft, but he has no idea what he’s talking about here. The fact he refers to CDs instead of Blu-Rays already suggests this.

    #7 2 years ago
  8. JGMR

    I care. I don’t give a fuck about your DD “games” (which are nothing more than licenses). I want to OWN my games. Internet-dependent slaves.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. fearmonkey

    Désilets is wrong but right at the same time,

    I don’t have to own every game I buy on physical media, but some games I want to own. There is a collector aspect of console gaming that PC gaming has lost. I never viewed my PC games as much as a collectors item as my cartridges and my console disk games, there are a few exceptions to that of course.

    Consumers want a choice and options, not to be told hey its going to be this way….suck it up…

    When someone tries that, then you get your revolution.

    #9 2 years ago
  10. BrutalZen

    Like poster #8 I most definitely care about physical media. Never appointed this Désilets to represent me about anything and when I read these quotes I probably most certainly never will.

    I went from physical media to almost all digital and what I learned from that was that I care less about what I purchased than when I had a physical CD or game. More specifically, I bought more in digital form but I did less with it. So, I bought more games but put less hours into them than with physical copies. This was also true for music cd’s. I listened more to music cd’s (the individual cd’s) than the digitally bought ones.

    For me, physical is the way forward.

    #10 2 years ago
  11. nollie4545

    Plastic discs are last gen. Load times are hilarious, and the discs get scratched to fuck. No thanks.

    #11 2 years ago
  12. JGMR

    @11 People who do not treat their discs with absolute care, shouldn’t even dare to call themselves gamers. All my discs are completely scratchless; the way they should be.

    #12 2 years ago
  13. DSB

    @9 The collector’s aspect was ruined first and foremost by the industry itself.

    I have fond memories of buying games in the 90′s. You’d get a nice big box with a big piece of artwork on it, stuff that someone had really cared to make, and very often you’d get trinkets with your purchase.

    At the very least you’d get a scrawny poster, but often you’d get a lot more. I mean something like DreamWeb came with an actual diary of a mad man and Lemmings 2 came with this extremely cute book telling the story of the lemmings.

    It’s stuff that couldn’t have cost much money to produce (just like collectors editions today don’t – total scams!) but it took a bit of actual effort to make, and it was free, and I think that’s a pretty good example of two things the industry frowns upon today.

    Now you get a scrawny plastic box with a piece of glass and plastic in it, and maybe a little slip with the EULA on it if you’re lucky. Seriously, fuck that – Straight to the incenerator.

    I can see why you’d want a collector’s edition of a game or series you really believe in, but to me it’s just a pathetic reminder of the glory days. Publishers just stopped caring.

    #13 2 years ago
  14. NinjaHart

    Physical games have a collectors value, digital have no collectors value at all. Nobody will be impressed about your download section of PlayStation Network, But if you actually have the physical discs, you have yourself a collection.

    Going all digital will completely destroy the collection part of gaming, which I don’t think a lot of gamers are too happy about.

    I also prefer having physical for consoles, it gives the feeling of actually owning something. In digital it’s just another name on the screen, and that’s no fun.

    #14 2 years ago
  15. gsxrlove

    This only demonstrates his disconnection with gamers more than anything else. (Much like Microsoft’s latest attempt to tell us “the definition of gaming in the future”)
    Digital downloads need to be able to be sold by the “current owner” if they want to come anywhere close to even matching a disc based experience PERIOD.

    #15 2 years ago
  16. JGMR

    @14 Well said. Most gaming companies do not even really care about PRESERVATION. They’re only interested in the fast buck. The mass consumer (the non-gamer who can claim he is one) does not look at things long-term. What happens when services end? Games are removed from servers due to licencing issues? What when these things happened and your worn-out flash drive gives up? If you want to be sure to enjoy your GAME on long-term, you gotta stay true as a gamer and stay retail.

    When retail ends, my support ends. Simple as that.

    #16 2 years ago
  17. DSB

    @15 Oh please describe the feeling you get when you take those 10 euro from Gamestop. I’m not familiar with this experience, but I’m extremely intrigued to learn that it exists.

    Is it anything like the feeling you get when you save 20 euro at GreenManGaming?

    #17 2 years ago
  18. ps3fanboy

    digital only = quit buying games, owning the physical media is everything. so if they want my money they better sell the games on disc.

    #18 2 years ago
  19. gsxrlove

    #17

    It’s got nothing to do with gamestop. It’s about the ability to give ownership or sell any “digitally downloaded” game I have to whoever I please. (Just like buying the game on disc and being able to physically give it to someone if I don’t plan on playing it any more.)

    #19 2 years ago
  20. DSB

    @19 For most people that really won’t be much of an issue down the road, and it wouldn’t make sense from a business perspective.

    There’s no expense to a traditional music store if you take a disc down from the shelf, but there is an expense to a digital music distributor when you download it again.

    Bandwidth isn’t very expensive, but neither is printing a CD, and you can’t transfer any of your current licenses onto a new physical copy if you lose the old one.

    On the flipside, music is pretty cheap, it’s only ever a few clicks away, and you can download it for as long as the service exist.

    Maybe there will be enough unhappy customers around to force the creation of a new kind of business model. It’s still early days.

    #20 2 years ago
  21. DarkElfa

    Who the fuck is this fucking fuck and why does he think he can see the future?

    #21 2 years ago
  22. JGMR

    Son: “Mum, I want one of these games for Christmas.”

    Mum: “Can’t you just download them, just like all these digital “Christmas cards”?

    People are becoming so moronic, so impersonal, so sociopathic with their “social media”, so fake/artificial. I really cannot express in words how I feel about them.

    #22 2 years ago
  23. pandulce1

    I certainly do care about owning the games I buy and not just renting them until X company allows me to do so.

    #23 2 years ago
  24. alterecho

    No way. I want my games in physical format or digital like GOG.com.

    #24 2 years ago
  25. gsxrlove

    @20

    You raise some good points. I can’t appreciate the advantage of not having to deal with dirty or lost discs though. It’s never been a problem for me but I can see how some would find this a benefit. I still don’t understand why BF3 for $109 AUS (+ your bandwidth) on Playstation Store or $29 AUS for a physical copy at my local retailer is any incentive for the gamer to encourage the digital age though.

    When you purchase a digitally downloaded title, are there limited amount of times you can download it from the store if you got your console is bricked/RROD/YLOD and have to replace it?

    Why can’t the digital evolution feel more mutual in terms of who benefits? It feels all a bit one sided to me.

    Much like you said, it is early days though.

    #25 2 years ago
  26. gargus

    I care.

    With digital games you cant sell them, you cant trade them in, you cant let a friend borrow them, you cant wait 30 years and sell the collection to a collector for a nice bundle of cash, you cant display them on a shelf, you probably wont be able to fire up a digital game to download and play in 15 years when you feel nostalgic, hell in 10 years your game may not even be around.

    The problem is most gamers only care about “right now”. They want to buy and download something right now. They don’t think or care about later, they want that instant gratification.

    When you buy a digital product you do not own it and you cant do anything you want with it. You are leasing a game on a contract where you can only do what the developer/publisher lets you do with it for an undetermined amount of time.

    Me? When I buy something I like to actually own it and have it belong to me to do what I want with.

    That’s why I never buy digital products. Well, there is the rare occasion I crack like when I got corpse party for my vita but that is like a once a year kind of deal.

    #26 2 years ago
  27. actuallyisnotafox

    im pretty sure games like ac3 and gtaIV all sold particularly well physically, so sure you take that away, just see who buys your games then

    #27 2 years ago
  28. DSB

    @25 Yeah, no argument there. The consoles have pretty much screwed the pooch on digital.

    They basically didn’t care for it or want it during this generation, so that’s another reason why Microsofts sudden conversion fell flat on its face.

    It’s pretty lame to pay for online services. Microsoft were making a killing selling their cheap bandwidth for a premium, so I guess they never “had” to care about things like service or building a decent digital marketplace.

    It’s pretty outrageous, but ultimately I don’t think there’s any way to make digital a success if you aren’t willing to give people some value in return. That’s the lesson from the PC at least. Steam was moving very slowly until they started giving something back.

    Who provides what depends on the service, but the big digital distribution services don’t limit your downloads. In my experience it’s typically the smaller companies who can’t front the bill. Or Ubisoft.

    #28 2 years ago
  29. salarta

    @11: “the discs get scratched to fuck”

    Do you let your cat play with your discs when you’re not using them?

    @14: Going full digital would destroy collector, preservation, and accessibility elements of gaming. The collector aspect is obvious; you get a game, you want to be able to put it on your shelf like a book or a film. Preservation and accessibility largely go hand-in-hand. If the game is only accessible via a server, and that server is taken down, how will the original consumers or future generations be able to play the game? Even if we make these digital games still accessible while offline, then unless there’s little to no DRM restrictions and it can be put on a flash drive or burned onto a disc, what we’re saying is that the game is as good as lost forever within a couple decades. The only ones that would conceivably have a shot at continuing accessibility and preservation through re-releases are excessively popular games, and that’s not good enough. Folklore and Shadow Hearts come to mind as two great games for consoles by now-defunct companies, and without discs, there would be no way to play them in the future.

    I think Desilets is like Bleszinski on this matter, thinking purely of the developer side and not consumers or the wider industry. E-books may be gaining traction, but that hasn’t stopped physical copies from selling to the masses. We’re not in a transitory phase there, we’re simply getting a new, easier format for enjoying content, and by consequence reducing, but not eliminating, the need for the physical.

    This actually reminds me how I tried to play the multiplayer for Quantum Theory. There was literally nobody to play with, because the game flopped despite being a fairly interesting title, yet a slew of the trophies were only possible through multiplayer.

    #29 2 years ago
  30. DSB

    @29 Going full digital would destroy collector, preservation, and accessibility elements of gaming.

    Really? I think you have the internet all backwards there.

    The same can be said for music, but the reality is that the serious collectors haven’t gone anywhere. There’s still a thriving market for vinyl and cd’s in something like heavy metal, and heavy metal is really a good example of what happens once digital becomes more prevalent, in terms of preservation and accessabillity.

    Only something like 10-15 years ago, listening to rare heavy metal albums involved thousands of dollars of investment in rare vinyls, tapes or cd’s. If you couldn’t track it down, or you couldn’t pay the price once you did, you couldn’t listen to it. Today, YouTube is packed with even the most obscure bands, and the Pirate Bay has entire collections of rare heavy metal that can only barely be found in physical formats today.

    Instead of relying on a few individuals to preserve those records, or waiting in hopes that they’ll sell so you can have it yourself, the music itself is now available everywhere.

    I don’t see why games would be any different. GOG already does a great job of preserving games that were previously trapped on collections of floppies gathering dust in someones attic, and truly saving it for the future, digitally.

    #30 2 years ago
  31. gomersoul

    The digital future may be inevitable but i think its quite a worrying future for consumers. the great thing about physical media other than the obvious ownership benefits is retail competition. digital games may only be available through Sony, ms, steam etc. consoles especially Will only give you one retailer to choose from and they’ll just charge what the fuck they want. I don’t like this, I don’t even like steam… my son wanted black ops one for his laptop when he can’t go on the ps3. looked on this steam thing people go on about….. £39.99!!! fuck off digital and come back when you can provide value!

    #31 2 years ago
  32. FrankWhite

    @31 the first person to complain about pricing on Steam, ever.

    wait till the steam summer sale, beware, your wallet is in for a beating.

    #32 2 years ago
  33. sparrow

    The day it’s digital only is the day i find a new hobby.

    #33 2 years ago
  34. Vargavinter

    I would be ok with all digital if the stuff you actually bought was backwards compatible and be sure that the digital networks are still up because in 20 years i can probibly still play Super Mario Bros on cart but I wont be able to play my digital Next-gen games.

    #34 2 years ago
  35. monkees19

    @34 Exactly!

    I care about hard copies of games. If they go digital, they will lose me as a customer. And I guarantee that. I will have a well stocked library of older games I will likely never finish and that will keep me busy.

    #35 2 years ago
  36. super3001

    Desilet 100% right

    discs need to die right now but stupid moaning stuck in past fanboys and idiot like vg247 writers want LAST GEN ALL OVER AGAIN and now we cant have digital share for xbone

    digital is the future. idiots dont understand

    #36 2 years ago
  37. OrbitMonkey

    “If they go digital, they’ll lose my custom FOREVER!!”

    lol, fucking liars. Sure you’ll spend a few moments weeping over your videocases, then you’ll move on… Just like everyone else.

    #37 2 years ago
  38. OrbitMonkey

    @36, Big difference between choosing teh future & sucking MS’s balls.

    #38 2 years ago
  39. Bomba Luigi

    Yeah, I could see me only buy Digital, but they ignoring big Parts of the World here. Digital Only would by far not working everywhere, even an Industry like the Musik Industrie that is already in Big Ways Digital still sells Millions and Millions of CD every Year. Of course Digital is bigger and more Important now, but Physical Discs are still there and Important too.

    Hell, even when I look at my Neighborhoods in Germany I can see Problems, because the Big Giant Telekom is cutting of Flats and brings Limitations for Downloadsizes. 2-3 Triple A Games and your Downloadspeed is terrible slow for the Rest of the Month.

    The Luxury of having good and fast Internet without Limits isn’t there everywhere. And it wont be there for quite a while.

    #39 2 years ago
  40. JGMR

    @33 Same here. Quite an easy decision to make actually. LOL

    #40 2 years ago
  41. salarta

    @37: Ah, the old “lol you secretly want this or don’t care and will cave eventually” argument. I see it all the time with fanboys of certain series that desperately want to believe that anyone saying they refuse to buy a new installment of a series will just want it “so bad” that they’ll “cave” and get it anyway on day one.

    #41 2 years ago
  42. DSB

    I think it’s more of a “You don’t care enough to inconvenience yourself in order to cling desperately to the past for all time” argument.

    I think the main difference is that people now have a (digital) forum where they can share and indulge their fear of all things new. It’s kind of an ironic place to do it, but then it’s never really about common sense.

    Whereas it used to be individual men who bitched about DVDs replacing their VHS tapes and having to “buy a new damn video player”, now you have a more sustained cacophony of whining every time someone tries to move things ahead.

    #42 2 years ago
  43. OrbitMonkey

    @DSB, pre-fucking-cisely.

    #43 2 years ago
  44. JGMR

    It is not about sentimentality. It’s about OWNERSHIP and care for PRESERVATION.

    #44 2 years ago
  45. DSB

    @44 I’m sure someone said the same thing when we went from clay tablets to paper. It’s served us pretty well even so.

    Your ownership has been challenged on physical media for decades now, you just never bothered to read a EULA so you could complain about that.

    Games are currently a lot better preserved on the internet than they are on floppy discs, cds or dvds. They’re being copied and distributed thousands of times over and kept on thousands of servers, so instead of clinging to a finite number of objects, we can literally reproduce them at any time.

    The internet is to games what amber is to Jurassic Parks dinosaur DNA.

    #45 2 years ago
  46. JGMR

    @45 These are non-arguments that have nothing to do with that. There will come a day when you want to go back to that one game you want to play again, and then you’ll be unable to do so. Why? Because YOU didn’t care.

    Like I said: Internet-slaves. Internet is your new God, your new thing you can all cling on to for your false safety and security.

    #46 2 years ago
  47. DSB

    @46 Your argument was two words written in all caps. Glass houses and what not.

    You know what I can’t play? My original copy of UFO: Enemy Unknown. It came on something like 46 floppy discs, some of which inevitably got corrupted, which meant I had to throw all of them away, and for years I had to rely on either my willingness to buy yet another reissue, or piracy whenever I wanted to play that game.

    Now, thanks to digital, I actually can play the game I got 20 years ago, instead of trying to raise heaven and hell trying to find a reissue or a second hand copy.

    The power of your fearmongering paranoia is really pretty weak compared to the satisfaction of succesfully installing one of my favourite games from 20 years ago in less than 30 seconds and playing the hell out of it whenever I want, whereever I want.

    And personally I think it’s a lot more religious to cling to the past and maintain an obsession with inanimate objects. If anyone’s hot on idolatry here, it’s really not me.

    #47 2 years ago
  48. JGMR

    There’s nothing paranoia about it. That’s one game you’re mentioning. Do you even know how many games are being “saved” by people who carefully preserved their games, because the companies didn’t exist anymore or didn’t care about their games anymore?

    Or what about people unable to download Donkey Kong Country on Nintendo’s VC service because Nintendo removed it from their servers?

    The internet is a great mean, no doubt. But to treat is as a end of all things results in over-dependency and ultimately slavery.

    True gamers stay retail

    /end of story.

    #48 2 years ago
  49. DSB

    @48 So you’re failing to provide me with any sort of reason as to why the internet would suddenly disappear, because your paranoia is extremely well supported by evidence?

    Feel free to share some whenever you like.

    Contrary to that paranoia, it is a fact that the digital distributors are still actively involved in selling and distributing games that are 20 years old or more, literally a decade after the physical industry has given up on supporting them in any way.

    #dealwithit

    Here’s Donkey Kong Country by the way, enjoy:

    http://coolrom.com/roms/snes/13814/Donkey_Kong_Country.php

    http://www.emuparadise.me/Super_Nintendo_Entertainment_System_(SNES)_ROMs/Donkey_Kong_Country_(USA)/33505

    #49 2 years ago
  50. FrankWhite

    Yeah, this is funny because it already is happening. Look at digital music. There are still a few physical retailers around, but for the past 5-10 years, all the big music retail shops have been closing hundreds of locations.

    The same is happening with video games. GAME uk and other retailers are shutting down by the hundreds. I expect even the mighty Gamestop in the USA will start closing down locations.

    The same has happened with Blockbuster and Netflix. Blockbuster used to have a shop in every single town in America, and now they have closed many hundreds of locations.

    There will always be a few physical shops left, but the vast majority of the industry is going to respond to the changing tides, and whether you want digital or not, it is inevitable.

    Simply put, digital customer convenience is way more important than the illusion of ownership for a small number of tinfoil hat wearers.

    #50 2 years ago
  51. JGMR

    More than enough reasons have been given by other people beside me. All you have to do…is scroll up.

    And, I still have the cartridge.

    And what? Illusion of ownership? Doesn’t that constitute rape?! LOL

    My god how stupid people can be. It’s really embarrassing.

    Well, have a nice weekend!

    #51 2 years ago
  52. DSB

    @51 Weaksauce :)

    #52 2 years ago
  53. nollie4545

    Physical media = last gen. Typical consolers who can’t bear to be without some pretty box with some shit in it.

    Optical = media, very slow load times. Bit of an issue since your pussy consoles only have 500GB drives and so installing everything might be a problem. Oh dear…

    Collectors edition- FFS like a special box and a keyring are worth anything, you can still get deluxe content on steam, you get additional stuff.

    The thing is, digital content is cheaper because there is NO retailer, NO product to physically ship, NO shop, NO staff and NO costs.

    Why the hell do you want to pay more for the same shit? So some spotty faced cock in GAME can hand you a box over a counter??

    You’re mad mad bastards.

    #53 2 years ago
  54. JGMR

    Sorry, I couldn’t resist! Xenophobia? Afraid of some effort getting a game? Lazy comfort creatures. Passionless sensationalists

    Bah!

    Bye.

    #54 2 years ago
  55. FrankWhite

    @54 Afraid of effort?

    Go ask Blockbuster if they were afraid of convenience. They are gone and dead. Lie to yourself all you want, but customer convenience is paramount. You may be willing to walk to a store, but for every one of you, there are thousands of lazy people who will not do that.

    Simply put, you are outnumbered, the free market is speaking and it is saying, we want more convenient services piped directly into our homes and living rooms.

    Feel free to throw around insults at people you disagree with, call them lazy or whatever you want. But the free market is speaking loud and clear, ask Netflix or Itunes and they will give you your answer.

    #55 2 years ago
  56. JGMR

    *buzzer-sound* There is no “free market”. Otherwise minorities would be protected from majors. And it is all by design. People like you cannot even grasp the fact how people are being manipulated by bombardments of rhetorical nonsense and memes.

    Go ahead and enjoy your games in the future…

    …if permission is granted of course!

    :D

    #56 2 years ago
  57. FrankWhite

    @56 right, enjoy buying your digital video games in the future. It is coming, whether you want it or not.

    Seriously though, it is funny to watch you squirm.

    #57 2 years ago
  58. fuchikoma

    @53 You’re right that there’s no product to ship. There’s also no product, period. It’s just a service. You’re too young to understand, but just wait a few years, then go buy a Wiiware/XBLA/PSN game at a pawn shop and pop it into your console and… Oh right – you can’t.

    I can still insert and play a PS2 game, PSX, NES, Intellivision, Dreamcast, you name it. Digital only? Not so much, because you don’t own it and you don’t have control over how it is used. Once the generation it’s from has passed, it’s gone for good. You may be fine with all gaming going that way. I pay for a number of games under $20 like that myself – but I know what I’m doing – they’re there as long as they’re there, and I’ll lose them some day when my console breaks down. If a system can only work like that? They can keep it, no matter what it is.

    #58 2 years ago
  59. JGMR

    Nah, I’m no worm. It is people like you who are willfully digging your own graves. You are the one that will be eaten BY worms. Not me.

    While you’ll be the perfect Internet-servant asking for permission to play a game, I’ll be enjoying my current collection offline.

    :D

    #59 2 years ago
  60. TrickyAudio

    Fuck that. I’d always want a physical copy.

    #60 2 years ago
  61. FrankWhite

    @59 I have access to all my digital music offline. I also have access to all of my digital video games on Steam offline. You think digital = online, which is stupid.

    Sorry that you are paranoid, enjoy buying physical formats while it lasts. It won’t last much longer :D

    #61 2 years ago
  62. JGMR

    @61 Yeah, until your hard drive is irreparably broken or your flash card worn out. All your “games” (licences/agreements) lost! And they shut down servers last month. Uh Oh!

    The REAL gamers will make sure THAT it will last. Sorry to shatter your envious dreams.

    #62 2 years ago
  63. FrankWhite

    Licenses are upheld by itunes and Steam, I can download my stuff whenever I want. I have multiple redundant storage drives to store my digital content. I can have infinite backups.

    Your physical formats can melt, be scratched, stolen and eventually the hardware failure that you refer to my harddrives is even more likely to happen to your physical consoles.

    I don’t have envious dreams, I am in reality, I am the future, you are the past. You can desperately cling to the past, like there are people who still watch VHS movies, but society has left you behind. Enjoy living in the 1990s and inside your own delusions.

    #63 2 years ago
  64. DSB

    @58 If you really want to keep dragging a bunch of old electronics around, I’m sure you can play a lot of things.

    What about the people who don’t see the appeal?

    Something like the Nintendo virtual console, or the SEGA reissues would never happen through physical channels. It costs too much to sell, and there are too few paying customers.

    Digital makes it possible to reissue old games, effectively not only preserving them, but reviving them, and people aren’t forced to buy second hand electronics if they want to play them.

    @62 You have to physically blow into your games before playing them.

    Envious? More like goodbye and good riddens.

    #64 2 years ago
  65. nollie4545

    Ultimately having physical copies of stuff won’t mean jack, because the hardware to run them will fail and no longer be supported eventually.

    The futures is in digital storage, probably in a cloud, not even in the device in your home.

    There is just no need for me to have a collection of slow, crap and easily destroyed optical discs in my home anymore. Even if my hard disc drive was to vapourise itself, I can just buy a new one, and download the lot from steam or itunes again, as many times as I like, I’ve already downloaded most of my games 3 times because I’ve done three clean installs in the life of my Steam account. Why the heck would I want to have to store a load of plastic discs?

    I can already play legacy software on my PC, by downloading shareware and abandonware that someone has lovingly remastered or modded or just made available for free. Games don’t die anymore, they go digital.

    #65 2 years ago
  66. JGMR

    I’m not the one who’s under the spell. Servers can melt too. Servers can be shut down. Games can be taken offline by your masters.

    Consoles can be repaired. Games can be treated with absolute care to avoid damage.

    I do not live in the past, nor the future, I live in the creative present.

    Well, you enjoy your servitude with a smile! LOL

    Goodbye :D

    #66 2 years ago

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