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Torment: Tides of Numenera sets Kickstarter record with three hours to go

Friday, 5th April 2013 21:21 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

With three hours left on the Kickstarter clock, Torment: Tides of Numenera has hit $4,028,412 thanks to 71,911 backers, and that’s not even counting the over $176,000 earned through PayPal. The latest round of money tossed at the project has made the project the current Kickstarter record holder for most funding, besting Project Eternity. The project with the most funding from all areas was Star Citizen and its $6.2 million. To celebrate the milestone, inXile posted another piece of concept art, showing off a male playable character. Enjoy.

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18 Comments

  1. No_PUDding

    Kickstarter is hitting PS2 budgets :)

    #1 2 years ago
  2. KernelPanic

    Yay! :D

    I hope people are willing to support http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/portalarium/shroud-of-the-avatar-forsaken-virtues-0 as well. Both projects look very very promising!

    #2 2 years ago
  3. Sini

    Sad day when this doesn’t reach 4.5mils, I want my player stronghold.

    #3 2 years ago
  4. Phoenixblight

    Its funny how people are lapping this crap up when InXile has yet to release the first Kickstarter project. I will be there to laugh when this bombs hard.

    Fargo just keeps on scamming with little to nothing to show. It must be nice to rip people off with little to offer as other Kickstarters that have failed.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. DSB

    @4 I’m just as surprised as you are, but the thing that makes Torment stand out is that the pitch is actually good.

    Eternity was a bunch of vague and generic fantasy crap, and Wasteland 2 just sounded an awful lot like Fallout.

    #5 2 years ago
  6. infamous

    @4
    you have no idea how game development works do you? The production team are already working on wasteland 2. They are working on the pre-production plans that have been laid out by brian and writing/design team.

    You get crap like the new aliens game when you just go full swing into production. Outsourced devs had no idea what direction to make the game cause there was none till the last minute. Inxile at least is showing they’re smart enough to plan ahead.

    Fargo has made it possible for many of the great games I played growing up to happen. He’s proven he knows how to make great rpgs happen & shows that he actually cares about the ppl he works with which is why he wants to keep them employed. I rather throw 20$ for a pre-order than give 60$ to a company who’ll just lay off they’re employees before or after they ship a game to save money. I’ve worked for companies that just see their employees at #’s so I fully support companies that treat their workers like family.

    @5 wasteland sound alot like fallout because the only reason Fallout was made was because EA owned the IP. More of fallout 1 & 2 like game aint a bad thing at all in my books.

    #6 2 years ago
  7. Gheritt White

    @1: “Kickstarter is hitting PSOne budgets”

    There, fixed that for ya.

    #7 2 years ago
  8. Phoenixblight

    @6

    I know how it works because I work in a studio. But no studio unless they are known to produce good work(Ixile isn’t) can develop a game along with a new one and sell both of them. Get real its a scam, its pyramid scheme. He is selling you something when the first product isn’t even out because he knows that is when he will get paid the most when he is still riding on the high of the first kickstarter. When the game is released and it bombs he is ok and can keep working. Its just a shell game on a corner of a street.

    Just look at the OUya people were swearing that it was going to wipe the floor with current gen console and the mobile market. What did those backers get? A 100$ prototype paperweight.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. DSB

    @6 But Fargo didn’t make Fallout 1 and Fallout 2. He was running Interplay. And the guys who did make it are mostly busy over at Obsidian.

    That’s what makes it so strange. People are throwing money at a guy whose last great game came in 1988, and now runs a studio known for epics like A Bard’s Tale or Hunted.

    I mean, seriously?

    #9 2 years ago
  10. Phoenixblight

    @9

    THat is another thing that bothers me Fargo is not a developer. He is a suit that sold games nothing more or less.

    #10 2 years ago
  11. No_PUDding

    @7

    I can’t tell you many PSone games that took 4.3 million to make, but I can tell you plenty of PS2 games that took that much to make.

    #11 2 years ago
  12. Jerykk

    While it’s true that inXile’s portfolio isn’t terribly impressive, it’s also true that they’ve been limited by publisher demands (like being forced to design for consoles as the lead platform). You’d be surprised by what developers can do when freed from such constraints and allowed to make the games they actually want to make, rather than the games they have to make in order to keep the studio alive.

    Based on the people involved and the details revealed thus far, I’m fairly confident in inXile’s ability to deliver good CRPGs. Apparently many other people share this confidence. We’ll have to wait and see how it turns out.

    Also, Fargo isn’t just another suit. He began his career as a designer and was directly involved in the creation of several RPGs in the 80′s, including the original Bard’s Tale and Wasteland. Even after he transitioned into more of a management role, he still greenlit innovative but risky projects that other publishers wouldn’t have, like Fallout, Planescape Torment, Sacrifice, Giants and other classic games. If Fargo were solely interested in making money, he wouldn’t be doing Kickstarters. He’d be working at EA, Activision or any other big publisher churning out big-budget shooters and their yearly sequels.

    #12 2 years ago
  13. Phoenixblight

    “If Fargo were solely interested in making money, he wouldn’t be doing Kickstarters. He’d be working at EA, Activision or any other big publisher churning out big-budget shooters and their yearly sequels.”

    Because they wouldn’t hire him. His portfolio is less than stellar and so he made a few CRPGs in the 80 that was before and during the crash. Everyone was making games and a lot of it was shovelware.

    “While it’s true that inXile’s portfolio isn’t terribly impressive, it’s also true that they’ve been limited by publisher demands (like being forced to design for consoles as the lead platform)”

    THere are plenty of studios indie and otherwise that have worked within those constraints and come out with great games. Fargo and Inxile just like to throw excuses. Look at Bathesda they kept ID, Splash Damage even with a horrible turn out of both releases this gen. Fargo just like playing the blame game because no one is buying. Kickstarter is starting to prove that its not an alternative for publishing because people are building into the hype. Its all coming down with projects falling apart after being funded or like the Ouya it being delivered and it being half of a product that people were told it would be.

    Any person can sell a pitch. Inxile has yet to actually produce anything and their videos of Wastelander 2 that I have seen do not show the money that was invested. My close friend has gotten a 150k from a publisher and his game puts it in the dirt and it was only made with 10 people. SO where the hell is Fargo throwing the money because it isn’t in the game.

    #13 2 years ago
  14. Jerykk

    Do you have anything to show of your friend’s game? Is it a CRPG? Is it released? If it’s not a CRPG and is instead something much simpler, it makes sense that it would have a slicker presentation. CRPGs have never focused on presentation and if you’re expecting any of these Kickstarted CRPGs to look like Skyrim or Mass Effect, you’ll be sorely disappointed.

    Personally, I thought the Wasteland 2 demo showed a lot of promise. It obviously wasn’t final but it was surprisingly polished for something that early. I’m also not sure why you keep bringing up the Ouya, either. The Ouya was (and still is) an inherently flawed concept. Why would I want to play mobile games on my TV? If I wanted a moddable, open platform, I already have my PC and I can always hook up my PC to my TV if I demand a couch experience. I’m not really sure why anyone funded Ouya, unless they really hate PC gaming or something.

    As for Fargo, you’re correct in that he hasn’t actually delivered on his promises yet. That won’t happen until the games actually come out. However, I do know that his decisions resulted in many of my favorite games being made and for that, I place trust in him and his company. It’s a bit premature to call him a fraud and declare the fall of Kickstarter. Wait until at least Wasteland 2 is released and then feel free to pass judgment.

    #14 2 years ago
  15. Phoenixblight

    “Do you have anything to show of your friend’s game? Is it a CRPG? Is it released?”

    It is a flight simulator that also has tower defense mechanics in space and I can’t show anything for it until it is released which will be in the fall sometime.

    BTW CRPGs just need data management and most of the game would be done in the spreadsheets if they built it correctly. THe engine would just take those spreadsheets and read the data. CRPGs are not as complicated as you think and as I said Wastelanders 2 doesn’t show the million + it is supposedly using. Thats why I am calling scam.

    #15 2 years ago
  16. Jerykk

    Spreadsheets just store values like IDs, health, mana, weight, alignment, etc. Someone has to design all the systems that actually use those values. Also, a good CRPG has lots of player reactivity, meaning tons of variables that go into both dialogue trees and level scripting. More variables = more complexity, as the designers have to account for the multitude of choices a player could make in any given scenario. RPGs, by their very nature, also require a significant amount of content (loot, NPCs, enemies, hubs, dungeons, companions, etc). I think you’re seriously underestimating both the complexity and scope of CRPGs. It’s a lot more complicated than making a tower defense game.

    What specifically about the Wasteland 2 demo didn’t impress you? Was it the presentation? Keep in mind that the bulk of the budget will go into designing and implementing the things I mentioned above. Slick graphics are not top priority because they are the most costly and would detract from the more important parts of an RPG. This has always been the case for relatively low budget RPGs ($3-4 million is considered low-budget). See Baldur’s Gate, Fallout, Planescape Torment, Arcanum, etc. If you want Skyrim-level presentations, you’re going to need a lot more than $4 million.

    #16 2 years ago
  17. Phoenixblight

    @16

    “This has always been the case for relatively low budget RPGs ($3-4 million is considered low-budget). See Baldur’s Gate, Fallout, Planescape Torment, Arcanum, etc. If you want Skyrim-level presentations, you’re going to need a lot more than $4 million.”

    Bull! Tech has changed in 10+ years you can do a lot more especially with unity and it takes little to no time to push it vs how stuff was done 10 years ago. Krater is a perfect example it didn’t cost the amount that Wastelander 2 was given, the game though lacks in gameplay, looks far better than Wastelanders 2.

    Since this game is turn based it will be all based on stats which is where spreadsheets will be utilised. Its not complicating especially since it only has one way to play. The only thing that would take the longest is testing and fine tuning the values. My friends and I made a turn-based RPG much like Tactics and it looked far better than the crap InXile are selling and we used the same engine. I am sure our stat system wasn’t as in depth because we only had 11 weeks but we had made a system that it was quite easy to add to if we wanted to. THat was with just 3 designers and 4 artist students.

    #17 2 years ago
  18. Jerykk

    Krater is a very simplistic dungeon crawler. It’s not comparable to a full-fledged, party-based CRPG with equally viable combat, stealth and diplomatic paths. I think this is what you’re not really grasping. There’s more to Wasteland 2 than just combat. Designing open-ended quests that accommodate a wide variety of character builds (beyond just different ways of killing stuff) is hard. Building characters and a world that react to the player’s choices is even harder. There are tons of variables to consider and each one requires a lot of design and writing work. Check out this update for a glimpse at the numerous considerations that have to go into even a basic quest:

    WL2 update

    It seems like you’re basing your hate solely on presentation, which is a bit silly. For one, the game isn’t done yet. Polish makes a huge difference and it doesn’t happen until late in the project. Secondly, as mentioned before, presentation has never been the focus of the best CRPGs. Ever. Krater is not a good CRPG. It’s not even a good dungeon crawler. Fallout was a great CRPG. Fallout 2 was a great CRPG. PST was a great CRPG. Arcanum was a great CRPG. None of these games had great presentations. If they wanted to do so, inXile could spend all their budget on the game’s presentation. Unfortunately, they’d have to significantly cut back on the game’s scope and complexity, taking away the things fans value most from the genre.

    So wait until Wasteland 2 is released before passing judgment. If it ends up being a crappy game, feel free to lambaste inXile. Until then, your criticisms don’t really hold much merit.

    #18 2 years ago

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