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The Elder Scrolls Online will support first-person gameplay, other preview nuggets

Tuesday, 19th March 2013 14:21 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

Many site have gone live with play impressions of The Elder Scrolls Online, and some of the information we’ve gleaned is as follows: its supports first-person gameplay; the UI is “minimalistic”; quests are instanced very subtly; and the combat will be similar to the PC versions of Skyrim or Oblivion. We’ve rounded up a few impressions below, and as more go live, we’ll link you.

Destructoid
Massively (2)
Polygon
PC Gamer
IGN
Shack
Eurogamer
PCgamesN
TenTonHammer

The Elder Scrolls Online will be playable at PAX East, and the MMO launches on PC later this year.

Breaking news

3 Comments

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  1. KineticCalvaria

    Ign clearly on the payroll… again. Sounds just like swtor from the Eurogamer preview, a huge disappointment, although kinda expected it.

    #1 1 year ago
  2. Tavarish

    “..combat will be similar to the PC versions of Skyrim or Oblivion.”

    So combat will have absolute no feel of weight, power, impact etc.? Just spamming attacks with zero feel to attacks until targets randomly drops dead? Kewl!

    #2 1 year ago
  3. TheWulf

    MMOs have lost their magic for me, I think. The two games that have come closest to what I’d like are Ultima Online and Guild Wars 2, both of which are very good games. But the problem for me is that I want to play games my way. As such, I’m just falling out of favour with the MMO genre. It’s a shame.

    Saints Row: The Third is illuminating really in regards to how well it manages to do both. You can bring a friend along with you for the journey and you can decide between the two of you how things go. What I’d really love to see is more along the lines of a co-op Mass Effect or Skyrim. I do like playing alongside friends. I have friends, and I don’t like neglecting them. And I have friends who play games, so it’s logical.

    The thing is is that my friends and I are usually very much on the same wavelength with what we want from an experience. It was fun watching a lady friend play Mass Effect 3 and react to everything in the same way I did. It was satisfying. So ultimately we do well in co-op games, and we work well as a unit. We mesh well together, and we’re efficient and helpful to each other. So for us it’s fun to play games together.

    Skyrim allows me to play my way, but ultimately it’s a lonely experience. Yes, I can tamper with the difficulty, I can make my own choices, and I can do whatever I please. Yet it still makes me feel like a bit of a loser spending so many hours of a game alone, it just doesn’t feel right. I’ve never been a lone wolf, I’m definitely a pack wolf. And without someone by my side, game experiences often feel sterile.

    Mass Effect (2 and 3) was really one of the few exceptions in regards to games where I wanted to put in a lot of hours, even if I couldn’t bring a friend along. So there is value in a game like that, like Mass Effect, and like Skyrim. In allowing the player to genuinely affect the world and to mould their gameplay experience to their liking. And to make decisions that, in an MMO, the writer would have to make.

    For example, in Skyrim I find it unconscionable to kill Paarthurnax. In Mass Effect I find it unconscionable to kill the frequently victimised geth. So I make my choices in regards to that, and my group tends to agree with my choices. As I said, we’re very much on the same philosophical wavelength. So with ME2 and ME3, I couldn’t help but feel that I wish I could have brought a friend along. Not to interrupt the story, but as a silent squadmate — just playing the game and enjoying it with me.

    The open world of Saints Row: The Third, and how fun it is to screw around with a friend in it just made me pine for a co-op game like Skyrim. One that wouldn’t make me feel like a loser for neglecting my friends. Where I could bring a friend or two (or three) along for the adventure. Where we could explore together and really enjoy the experience. I don’t understand the lone wolf people really, who want a sterile, quiet experience.

    To me, a game that quiet feels like I’m constantly walking through a morgue, with the odd chatty NPC to break up that feeling. Oblivion, for all of its prettiness, held that quality. And Skyrim took that and drove it through the roof by making the ambiance match the game (it was a miserable experience with very little cheer, and I think they intended it that way). Morrowind was better, but still.

    So I’m on the look out for more like Saints Row: The Third. I don’t want to neglect my friends, but at the same time I think I’m pretty much done with MMOs. I’m tired of being locked into a class, and locked into a plot, and being told that I can’t do this or that. The thing is is that I can’t bring up a debug console and do away with an NPC I dislike because it’s an MMORPG, I dislike that.

    In Skyrim, I disliked the Blades so much that I turned them into dragons. (I felt that this was a fitting punishment.) I like having that level of control over my games, as I find that fun.

    So… yeah. I mean… this does sound interesting, yeah? But if I find an NPC to be truly obnoxious, I won’t be able to turn them into a farm animal. And that’s what’s killing my interest in the MMORPG. Interestingly, back in Ultima Online, I believe you could turn NPCs into farm animals and such. At least early on.

    TL;DR: Most MMORPGs are focused towards the majority — essentially violent people with sociopathic tendencies. So playing a mostly pacifistic person is possible. Many other, similar choices are denied to me in MMORPGs. And yet I don’t want to disregard my friends. So I’ll be looking for good, storied co-op experiences mostly in the future.

    #3 1 year ago