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DmC – the final interview: staking the heart of perception

Friday, 11th January 2013 09:24 GMT By Dave Cook

DmC: Devil May Cry launches worldwide on January 15th. VG247′s Dave Cook speaks with Capcom and Ninja Theory about their partnership, and the perceptions they hope to put to bed once the game drops.

DmC: Devil May Cry

The game was first announced at TGS 2010 by way of this controversial trailer. The clip ended months of speculation that Ninja Theory was working on a Devil May Cry sequel.

Stace Harman wrote our final hands-on preview of the game, covering the first ten missions. You can check it out here.

DmC: Devil May Cry reviews have already begun. We’re compiling them all in this article. Make sure you check back on January 14th for all the scores as they appear.

The latest CGI trailer released by Ninja Theory can be found here. It turns out Dante hates banks.

It’s funny to think that in just a few days time, almost two years of presumption surrounding Ninja Theory’s Devil May Cry reboot will either be confirmed or killed dead. It’s something that both the developer and Capcom have been looking forward to for some time, as it means gamers can finally get the title into their hands and judge it on merit, rather than previews, the demo or studio chatter.

I spoke with Capcom US producer Alex Jones and Ninja Theory’s communications manager Dominic Matthews at Eurogamer Expo back in September, but I decided to hold off the interview until this week, when both expectations and concerns are running at their hottest. It’s a tense time for fans, as I’m sure it is for the game’s co-developers, but one thing is certain: seeing the reviews spill out next week will be very interesting indeed.

I asked Jones about the nature of perception surrounding the title, as it’s clear that many people made their minds up about the game early on in development. He replied, “There’s a lingering uncertainty as to whether we’re going to make an awesome Devil May Cry game that wasn’t developed directly in Japan. We obviously want to put a stake in the heart of that.

“I’m going to go ahead and say I think we have at this point, so hopefully what we’re doing is showcasing what we think is compelling about the title, rather than playing defence, that we can show you and say, ‘look, this is great.’”

Jones is referring to – of course – the live demo pods present at Eurogamer Expo, which gave the public an early taste of Ninja Theory’s vertical slice, which is available on PSN and Xbox Live now. Both Capcom and the developer have been eager to get DmC into the hands of gamers. But critics have exerted caution around their ‘wait and see’ messages.

Even on this site I’ve seen many gamers raise concerns around Ninja Theory’s messages – ‘Wait until you see gameplay’, ‘Now wait until the demo comes out’, then finally, ‘Wait until the full game launches’. I get where they’re coming from, but having started a second playthrough recently ago I can see why the studio has been towing this line.

It’s because the demo is a tiny fragment, an incomplete shard of a larger package – remember how poor the Bayonetta demo was in comparison to the full game?. You have only a selection of the weapons at hand, the full extent of the clever plot isn’t there, and none of the game’s stellar moments are present. Maybe Ninja Theory should have revealed more in its demo, but it doesn’t matter now as the full game is coming out imminently.

I asked Jones about how seriously Capcom and Ninja Theory takes critical feedback and how it uses it to improve the game. He explained that while it can be tricky, it’s something both parties felt was vital to creating the best game they could.

“It’s never easy,” Jones explained, “because inevitably you have to have a more or less done game. When you have a more or less done game, people just want it to be done, they don’t want to go back and open it up to make changes.

“But we have to, because if you’re not iterating, not polishing a game like this… it’s all about the polish, you actually do need to work almost to the point of diminishing returns, because the previous games have just been so highly-polished when it comes to the combat and fluidity. So basically, these guys have been good sports about really polishing up to the last possible moment.”

At the end of the day, it’s Ninja Theory who has to open the game back up and fix issues. Where some might view this as a laborious chore, Jones explained that the developer was committed to the cause, “These guys have been amazing, like most developers would had three or four random guys from Japan show up at some point and start lecturing them about how to do stuff, and it might not have gone as well.

“But the Japanese guys are super-open about knowing what Ninja Theory did well and leaving them alone to do that, and the Ninja Theory guys were really good about knowing that there is almost 30 years of fighting game experience at this table and thinking, ‘We should probably listen to them.’

“There are very few good independent developers, and if you get the chance to lock one or two down and continue to work with them, as a publisher you have to do that. Because firstly you’ll never have enough internal capacity – given the expense involved in making games – to keep your portfolio level where it needs to be.

“Guys like Ninja Theory and Dontnod who – in the case of Ninja Theory have a proven track record of delivering quality products more or less on time, and at an expected level of quality – I mean yeah, you have to keep working with those guys.”

Jones closed by saying very frankly, “We looked at it like, ‘We need to make the best DmC game we can make, or we’re not going to get another shot’”. He’s right of course, because if this game fails in the current climate it will be tough to convince Capcom – or any publisher when facing any new title – to spend money and resources on anything less than a sure thing.

I then turned to Matthews and asked him how it feels to be bombarded with daily negativity and questioning from fans. He replied, “We’ve even seen people questioning if Ninja Theory even like Devil May Cry, and I can tell you that we’re in love with it. Through the job it becomes your life.”

It’s clear that the Devil May Cry franchise is a big favourite around the Ninja Theory office, so I asked Matthews if the studio felt privileged when it landed the reboot gig. “Of course yeah,” he replied, “and that goes across the studio. One thing that’s very strong at Ninja Theory is that we want to work on projects that we want to work on, and Devil May Cry was one of those.

“We jumped at the chance to work on this and it was great to work with Capcom, but from day one it was really a collaboration between the talent at the studio and at Capcom. Although we didn’t have the same level of freedom that we would have with our own IP, it was a new, exciting and experimental period to take an existing franchise and character, and then come up with a new, interesting direction.

“That was really something we worked closely with Capcom on. It wasn’t a case of us just going off and doing our own thing, then just throwing it out there. We worked iteratively with Capcom over time to get it down to exactly the right direction.

“There’s a lot of talent on both sides, and I think like Alex said; Capcom has got such a rich heritage in fighting games – probably better than anyone else in the world – so it’s humbling for us to work with these people who know these things so well.

“But what we bring to the table is a different set of skills – story-telling, visuals, action gameplay that we’ve shown in out previous games – and there is huge mutual respect. The partnership between Capcom and Ninja Theory is very strong, and actually we’re quite similar in many ways because we have such high standards on both sides that we both know we’re pulling in the right direction.”

Although expectations were high, Capcom was happy to let Ninja Theory run riot on the areas it excelled at, “I think Capcom gave us a good level of freedom and actually pushed us to think about Devil May Cry in different ways,” Matthews continued, “so there’s elements of the game that are entirely consistent with the canon, and there are others that we have changed. As a partnership we felt they were the right things to do.

“I would say that the game has a fresh new look and feel, but there are certainly things in there that fans will recognise. Dante is the Dante that everyone knows and loves, and you will see that develop over the course of the game. Then you have characters like Vergil. We know who Vergil is and we wanted to show a different part of that story.”

No matter who you ask, the meat of DmC comes down to its combat, and Matthews was happy to explain what Ninja Theory was trying to achieve with Dante’s new tool-set, “We’ve got amazing designers who have worked on this for three years,” he explained, “but we’ve also had amazing partners at Capcom with Itsuno-san, who was director on previous Devil May Cry games and who held our hands at the start, and helped us get this exactly right.

“What we wanted to do was create a tool-set of combat options that you could pick and choose from as you want to express themselves through the system, and yeah, it’s taken a lot of sweat and blood to get it just right, but the pay-off – we’ve seen people playing it and telling us it feels and plays better than they expected.

“To be given this opportunity to work on the title, and with Capcom themselves, but to also see the inner workings of Capcom’s thinking towards combat – like I said – they’re the best in the world I think. Seeing where they’re coming from in regards to games in the past has been amazing, but we’re now at a place where we feel we’ve nailed combat to an extent.”

I close our chat by asking Matthews what he felt when seeing people playing Devil May Cry at Eurogamer Expo and gauging their initial reaction, “I think it was more than looking to individual moments. Something we wanted to do was get that feeling of experimentation and discovery in the combat.

“I’ve been playing this game for a long time now and I’ll come to shows like Eurogamer Expo and I’ll see someone doing something completely different stuff to me, or that no-one at the studio has seen. That’s where the real fun comes, and we’ve had some hardcore guys come into the studio and give us some feedback.

“It’s been amazing to talk with them and hear them say, ‘I wonder if I can do this?’ then they go away and find that yeah, they can do that. This is a feeling that Devil May Cry had, and one that we wanted to bring in DmC. I’m excited to see this game come out and to see player videos, because I just know there’s going to be stuff we haven’t seen before or haven’t even thought about.

“We wanted people to be limited only by their imagination. We’ve got so many options, and the ability to change combos on the fly mid-combo, you can start a combo with one weapon and end it with another, you can add in Dante’s abilities, you can switch combos in the air, use firearms.

“It comes down to a question of how dexterous you are with the pad, but it’s something that I personally enjoy – playing the game for twenty minutes to try more and more stuff.”

Jones then added, “I want people to come away and say ‘that was an awesome game’, whatever that may mean. Because for some people it will be their first Devil May Cry experience, but for others it will be a series they’ve played for a long time.

“But more than just saying it’s awesome, I want them to say that then start the game again, and again, and again to push those ranks up, learn new combos and unlock new things.”

Devil May Cry launches on PS3 and Xbox 360 worldwide on January 15th. You can read our final impressiosns on January 14th at 8am.

Latest

51 Comments

  1. Tminhaj

    herpa derp

    #1 2 years ago
  2. Dave Cook

    @1 cheers for that incredibly low-brow insight.

    #2 2 years ago
  3. Dark

    For those of you who want to get this game , better avoid forums and youtube videos .. because the ending has been leaked.

    #3 2 years ago
  4. YoungZer0

    Great interview, Dave. Really enjoyed reading that. At this point, i don’t even care if the demo didn’t show me everything that is in game, i loved it. Played it over 20 times now and can’t wait for next week. FINALLY, the chance to play the full game.

    Props to Capcom for not losing their shit over their constantly crying fanbase and standing behind Ninja Theories vision for the game.

    Recently saw the cutscene between Dante and Vergil, meeting for the first time. The performance is amazing and the dialog solid. Loved Dantes rather absent interest for the whole dialog.

    In case people don’t know what cutscene i’m talking about:

    http://youtu.be/qmAxWs6i0zs?t=30s

    After that, i stopped watching, i’m afraid i might ruin my experience if i continue to watch everything i can get my eyes on.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. Dave Cook

    @4 thanks man, yeah definitely don’t watch any more. keep it pure. The story is honestly good and full of twists, even if people don’t believe it.

    #5 2 years ago
  6. YoungZer0

    @5: Yes! That’s exactly what i was hoping for. The wait is driving me nuts. >_<

    #6 2 years ago
  7. SameeR_Fisher

    @dave: you are hyping the game alot, even though it wasn’t to my liking ((and I was hating and ripping off people LOL)) I am beginning to be really interested, when I played the demo I liked what they done, it seems new to me, got a little bit of Heavenly Swords ((3 weapon system)) which is even more to my liking.

    Anyway quick question :

    “Jones closed by saying very frankly, “We looked at it like, ‘We need to make the best DmC game we can make, or we’re not going to get another shot’”. He’s right of course, because if this game fails in the current climate it will be tough to convince Capcom – or any publisher when facing any new title – to spend money and resources on anything less than a sure thing.”

    Isn’t Jones Capcom US producer ?!, he is part of Capcom, so it doesn’t make sense that Capcom won’t give him another shot, or is he talking about Capcom Japan ?!, and Capcom Japan are the ones who holds all the cards ?!

    Also Dave, assuming DmC resonate with gamers, and break through sales, who do you think will handle the sequel ?!, you think Ninja Theory will do DmC 2 ?!

    #7 2 years ago
  8. Dave Cook

    @8 Not hyping as such man, it’s genuinely good from an unbiased perspective, even if gamers are accusing any game critic who likes it as being paid off. Pathetic.

    But thanks man yeah, I give good games credit where it’s due :)

    Yes DmC 2 will – in my opinion, based on nothing but the plot – happen 100% if this game sells well.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. SplatteredHouse

    “But more than just saying it’s awesome, I want them to say that then start the game again, and again, and again to push those ranks up, learn new combos and unlock new things.”

    This is music to my ears. Not many action games with me does this happen to, (Ninja Gaiden Black/Sigma/2, and Nier, in recent memory, God of War going back a bit) but that’s one of the things I like in this genre. The feeling that the game both short and longer term can accommodate, survive, even reward return journeys. I really like the confidence of the interviewee. I like the look, and quantity of media released that supports that enthusiasm. It’s almost time for Dante’s return!

    #9 2 years ago
  10. SameeR_Fisher

    @Dave: Great to hear that, can’t wait to read your review.

    #10 2 years ago
  11. eishun

    serious question
    have you ever played DMC series before?

    #11 2 years ago
  12. Dave Cook

    @11 who are you asking that to? If me then yes, I’ve played all four of them, and I’m on my second play-through of the reboot.

    Hack n’ slash is my favourite genre. I know it very well, and DmC was in dire need of a reboot imo. But that – of course – is just my humble opinion.

    #12 2 years ago
  13. Fin

    The internet:

    DMC: OMG THIS GAME IS DIFFERENT TO THE ORIGINALS I HATE IT SO MUCH
    CoD: OMG THIS GAME IS THE SAME AS THE ORIGINALS I HATE IT SO MUCH

    #13 2 years ago
  14. Monkee_Nutz

    @11

    Serious Question: Are you able to consume solid foods without having them dribble down your chest?

    Honestly. Stop being such a fucking asswipe.

    #14 2 years ago
  15. Gheritt White

    I loved everything about the demo… apart from the combat. Just couldn’t get my head round the controls; think I’ll be sticking with God of War and Castlevania: Lords of Shadow.

    #15 2 years ago
  16. YoungZer0

    What’s so complicated about the combat?

    #16 2 years ago
  17. KrazyKraut

    Combat in LoS was too slow. Thats why I wait for DMC and MGS:R.

    #17 2 years ago
  18. eishun

    @14 why the insult? i only ask him about it
    @12 good, are the combat in any way as deep as the older title? [DMC3 and DMC4]

    #18 2 years ago
  19. Dave Cook

    @19 I’ll get savaged for this, but I firmly believe they are deeper than DmCs 1, 2 and 4, and perhaps on par with 3.

    Handling-wise, it feels more like Bayonetta, which in my opinion is awesome.

    #19 2 years ago
  20. YoungZer0

    @18: Probably because some DMC Fans think that you can only enjoy this game if you haven’t played the previous games.

    #20 2 years ago
  21. Clupula

    Unless the game improves 1000% upon the demo, I do not see the combat as anywhere close to DMC 1 and 4, and nowhere even in the same sentence as Bayonetta and DMC3. It was more fun to play than DMC2, but that is a very low bar to go over.

    #21 2 years ago
  22. Dave Cook

    @21 I know you don’t see it that way. But that’s my take on it :)

    #22 2 years ago
  23. YoungZer0

    @21: You don’t see the combat as anywhere close to DMC 1? DMC 1?! Have you played that game recently? Because the combat wasn’t deep at all.

    #23 2 years ago
  24. Clupula

    @23 – My only problem with the combat in DMC1 is the weird placement of the jump button, but I am told the DMC HD Collection, which I’ll be picking up on Tuesday as my way of cleansing my mind of this game, fixes that and puts it on X, where it belongs.

    #24 2 years ago
  25. Dave Cook

    @24 it did fix it yeah :)

    #25 2 years ago
  26. Dave Cook

    @23 I agree with you mate, the combat wasn’t as deep. Everyone seems to remember it as being deep. It’s confusing.

    The original game’s combat was awesome mind, I’m in no way saying otherwise.

    #26 2 years ago
  27. YoungZer0

    @24: Well, it’s not deep. You’ll see soon enough.

    @26: Biased people being biased. DMC 1 really didn’t age well.

    #27 2 years ago
  28. The Dude

    @19: Dave. Actually, first off let me just say: hello, I read these comments a lot and am a big fan of the site in general.

    Now to business – I must STRONGLY (!) disagree with your view that the combat in DmC is deeper than Devil May Cry 4/on par with 3. Sure it’s deeper than 1 & 2; they were the beginning if the franchise. You walk before you run (or in the case of DMC1 to 2 – walk then fall flat on your face). But from what I’ve played, I most definitely feel it is a step down from both 3 and 4.

    I should say first I think 4 has the best combat in the entire series. It took what 3 did and built upon it to create the tightest and most flexible combat system of not just the DMC, but the hack & slash genre (to be toppled later by Bayonetta of course).

    DmC though frustrates me to no end because it feels like a huge departure from Devil May Cry (never mind the story/art direction, I’m just talking about the game mechanics here). The whole system of holding triggers to switch between styles for me is clunky and a step down from what 3 & 4 built. Constantly holding the triggers and pressing attack without any directional input makes me feel as though I’m playing with boxing gloves on… yeah, I don’t like it. I don’t like the lack of lock on either. I feel limited in what I can achieve in comparison with 4, less in control with less outcomes of how I can defeat an enemy. Also when the enemies that can only be defeated by using the axe or scythe is puzzling, as again you’re being limited and essentially told how to defeat this enemy. It stumps any create flare you might otherwise have when choosing to deal with him. Plus the whole dodge button thing, but I’m sure that’s been mentioned already.

    For me, this is DmC’s biggest failing – the combat.

    And now I shall whip you with my internet whip.

    #28 2 years ago
  29. ActionGameKing

    @ Dave Cook

    I’ve been following your defence of DmC for weeks now, and I’ve finally decided to make an account to set things straight.

    Please never mention Ninja Theory’s DmC and P*’s Bayonetta in the same sentence again.

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vVBjG66a0pw <- There is no comparison

    Also, never mention DmC and DMC 3 in the same sentence again either.
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3T_RdUPNg6k <- There is no comparison

    This new DmC is aimed at casual audiences, it does not push the genre forward like DMC1,DMC3, and Bayonetta. If you want true innovation, wait for Metal Gear Rising( allows the ability to slice almost anything, including the environment, with satisfying physics for the first time in gaming).

    #29 2 years ago
  30. YoungZer0

    Not really convincing videos you posted there.

    #30 2 years ago
  31. Phoenixblight

    @30

    Yeah not at all.

    #31 2 years ago
  32. Ireland Michael

    @29 How about actually making a valid argument with your own observations, written down succintly, instead of simply telling people what they should and shouldn’t say? Because that just makes you sound obnoxious and incapable of forming an educated opinion.

    Nobody is discounting the qualiy of Bayonetta or Devil May Cry 3. Simply posting two videos of nice combos doesn’t prove anything. DmC is capable of tonnes of elaborate combos.

    Why are they better?
    What about them is more elaborate?
    How much extra skill does it involve?

    If anything, that DMC3 videos only goes to shows just how stupidly easy it is to manipulate the game for easy SSS combos. The game was open to plenty of exploitation in its mechanics.

    Bayonetta had a few loopholes of its own too, that were never fixed. Lt. Col. Kilgore/Durga exploit, anyone?

    Dave has hinted that there’s a mechanic in play later in DmC that makes combo variety a nessecity, but he can’t say anything because it’s still under embargo. The only clue so far is… “Ikaruga”.

    #32 2 years ago
  33. Clupula

    @29 – Yeah, as someone who is NOT a fan of this whole DmC thing, posting a bunch of combo videos doesn’t really make for a convincing argument. There’s a lot of things you can say against the game, combat-wise, but showing a video doesn’t really help. There will probably be videos of this too. Doesn’t really make it better/worse, especially if you’re not even pointing anything out about the videos. You’re just saying, “Watch this” and then saying there is no comparison.

    Don’t make the people who dislike this look bad. Be smart about your argument.

    #33 2 years ago
  34. ActionGameKing

    @32 “a mechanic in play later in DmC that makes combo variety a nessecity”

    Some enemies are immune to certain weapons, so the game forces you to switch weapons. That’s all. There is leaked gameplay for different parts of the entire game online now, including the ending (which is causing some controversy/dissapointment).

    I would love to hear Dave’s response to what #28 and I wrote. This is my first time commenting and I love this site man. Always passionate debates.

    But I don’t argue on the internet, I just state facts.

    #34 2 years ago
  35. Phoenixblight

    “I just state facts”

    Oh just like BDH. Those videos and your opinions are facts? Gotcha….

    #35 2 years ago
  36. Ireland Michael

    @34 “That is better than this” is not a fact. It’s an opinion.

    #36 2 years ago
  37. ActionGameKing

    lol @35 & 36

    I’ll even go a step further and say that DmC will review well, but worse than Bayonetta and DMC 3 when they originally came out.

    Even further, MGR:Revengeance will review higher overall than DmC, because it’s superior. lol That’s my honest prediction and you guys can hold me to that.

    #37 2 years ago
  38. Clupula

    @37 – Who cares how well something reviews?!?

    Jesus, man. God Hand and Nier reviewed horribly and they’re both amazing games. This will get great reviews, especially among people who thought the originals were too hard. Why would you use that as a way to back up your opinion?

    #38 2 years ago
  39. Dave Cook

    @29 Hi, and welcome to the site. As a disclaimer, I’m not arguing with you in this reply either, or being a dick to you, just understand that I appreciate you saying you like the site and that you just signed up. I hope you stick around, we’re a good bunch once you get to know us.

    Now on to my reply.

    “Please never mention Ninja Theory’s DmC and P*’s Bayonetta in the same sentence again.”

    Please don’t tell me what I can and can’t say on the site I write for.

    Some background about me:

    The hack n’ slash genre is my hands-down favourite. I know it incredibly well. Bayonetta is the only game this generation I have awarded a 10/10 score back when I used to think scores were important. I hold it in the utmost regard in terms of the genre. It advanced the genre in terms of combat execution. It is not, however, flawless. No game is.

    DmC has no lock-on. So what? That’s just how the overall mechanic works, and you will learn fight well without it with practice – more practice than the demo affords. You adapt, you get used to it and you lean how to kick serious ass with the tools provided.

    The combat is comparable to Bayonetta. Any one who says otherwise is in denial. It is similar because it is more free-form than the old DmC titles, the weapon switching borrows heavily from Bayonetta’s system. There’s even a dodge role bullet-time move unlocked later on in the game. It flows better than the old DmC games but isn’t as technical from an input stance as Bayonetta or DmC 3.

    That may sound like it has been dumbed down, but this game is less about long inputs and more about how you use the short form commands. Placement, timing – some of it is even rhythmic like El Shaddai. You cannot judge it fully on the demo alone, just like we in the games press can’t.

    “I’ve been following your defence of DmC for weeks now”

    I haven’t been defending the game. That would be biased. Instead I am setting records straight with the truth – as I’m now on my second play-through – where gamers have only played the demo. But at no point do I expect people to take my word as gospel.

    I’m not saying opinions are wrong here, all I ever want readers to do is take my words and then make their own mind up about things. That is why I do this job, to give people the context to make their own verdict. I don’t treat you like an idiot to be told what to think, I want healthy debate and discussion.

    As such please don’t confuse the truth for bias or rank fan-boy defence. I’m absolutely not like that.

    “Some enemies are immune to certain weapons, so the game forces you to switch weapons. That’s all”

    That’s not all. You’d know this if you had played the full game, like me, and perhaps it is Ninja Theory’s failing for not making this clearer, I’m not sure. There are light and dark enemies yes, but then there are armoured ones, flying ones, ones with shields, others that phase in and out of Limbo. Many varieties.

    I guarantee you won’t appreciate this on your first playthrough, but your second. I cant say more on this, you need to wait for my review then choose to agree/disagree then.

    Again, welcome to VG247′s threads. I hope you do stay and contribute often, and again I amn’t having a go at you here. We debate hard on this site but it’s 99% friendly.

    Over to you guys, I’m off on holiday now. Check back for my review on Monday morning.

    Dave

    #39 2 years ago
  40. bitsnark

    @39

    Basically this.

    All day long.

    #40 2 years ago
  41. ActionGameKing

    @39 :D Dave I couldn’t have asked for a better response. Didn’t mean to sound like a dick, obviously it’s your site and you can say what you wish. But this is my favourite game site, and being a DMC fan I had to crack muh whip at the Bayonetta comparisons. lol

    #41 2 years ago
  42. Dave Cook

    @41 Not a problem, I understand you weren’t being a dick. I never assume that about anyone here unless they give someone a proper hard time (it happens sadly).

    Again, welcome to the fold. You’re going to enjoy it here :)

    #42 2 years ago
  43. ActionGameKing

    @42 Also Hack/Slash is my fav genre as well, and DMC 1 is my fav game of all time. Don’t worry man, I’ve been following your debates with other fans/non fans for weeks nows. The game is good in my opinion, just not what fans wanted, maybe this is Capcom’s marketing to blame. Either way, VG24/7 FTW.

    #43 2 years ago
  44. Dave Cook

    @44 thanks :)

    I’d also be careful in saying that it isn’t be game fans wanted. Many fans visit this site and they’re perfectly happy with what Ninja Theory has done. I’m a fan and I like it. It’s a blanket statemet that many make about this game. It’s like people speaking on the behalf of others, which most people don’t like.

    Also Clupula. I adore God Hand. It is absolutely superb. My old colleague still has my PS2 version. I won’t go ito that as it makes me mad. But yes. We need more wrestling gorillas in our games that for sure.

    #44 2 years ago
  45. ActionGameKing

    @44 True! lol yh, replace “just not what fans wanted”, with “just not what fans expected”. That initial reboot trailer caused alotta Hoopla, whew man. Now just waiting patiently for Bayonetta 2!

    #45 2 years ago
  46. YoungZer0

    Fuck it, i just pre-ordered it at Gamestop. I still think 59€ is an outrageous price for any game, but I do want the Vergil DLC.

    And my girlfriend payed half of the price because she’s just as in love with the game as i am, so i guess that’s why i was okay with the price after all.

    Am I the only one who thinks the special edition isn’t really special at all? 10 € more for a necklace, that will probably break any second and some weapon skins?

    #46 2 years ago
  47. DreamCleaver

    @46
    Ooof, that’s a lot of money. I pre-purchased the PC version for $37.50 over at Green Man Gaming yesterday. Used the “pre-purchase games” 25% off voucher code.

    #47 2 years ago
  48. Dave Cook

    @47 green man gaming. What a bunch of pros :) they’re so damn affordable these days it puts folk like Game to utter shame. Quite rightly too.

    #48 2 years ago
  49. YoungZer0

    @47: Would love to get deals like those in germany. Weren’t looking for it for in this case, because i would’ve gotten the DLC no matter what.

    #49 2 years ago
  50. absolutezero

    Oh God the ending is hilarious.

    A Plus writing and dialogue.

    #50 2 years ago
  51. DreamCleaver

    @48 Indeed. :D

    #51 2 years ago

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