IGDA offers to assist VP Biden with violent games research

Thursday, 10 January 2013 19:50 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

The International Game Developers Association has offered to assist US vice president Joe Biden with evidence-based research on whether violent video games and media contribute to gun violence.

Chairman Daniel Greenberg of IGDA’s Anti-Censorship and Social Issues Committee contacted the VP through a letter, stating the firm doesn’t “seek to impede more scientific study” its members’ products.

“We welcome more evidence-based research into the effects of our work to add to the large body of existing scientific literature that clearly shows no causal link between video game violence and real violence,” wrote Greenberg. “We would not want to see those efforts diverted toward non-causal sources and away from meaningful change to real dangers.”

Greenberg also suggested that any new research conducted on the matter also note the beneficial effects of violent games such as: helping the player release any feelings of aggression; and how imaginary violence can possibly “help children master experiences of being frightened.”

“For example, some violent games add non-violent options and solutions based on problem-solving and player creativity,” Greenberg continued. “Other games offer greater rewards for mercy and compassion. Many popular video games offer tough lessons in making better choices through interactive storylines that let players experience the consequences of their actions.

“Some game developers have responded to real world violence by creating games designed for conflict resolution, anti-bullying and aggression reduction. The government can help this process by supporting this unique, cutting edge research into harnessing the power of video games to help solve our nation’s problem with violence.”

Biden met today with outside groups on gun safety, such as representatives of the NRA, sportsmen, women and wildlife groups.

A list of recommendations is expected to be delivered to US president Barack Obama.

Via: GI International, ABC News.

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