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Courting the core: how Ubisoft nailed E3 2012

Friday, 15th June 2012 08:49 GMT By Brenna Hillier

While other publishers ask you to ignore the gaping, next-generational holes in their line-ups, Ubisoft went to E3 with the express intent of capturing the core gamer’s love – and it got it.

Ubisoft was clever this year. The publisher has loads of digital, casual and social initiatives on the go, many of which are likely to prove important and successful, but it didn’t waste its E3 time talking about them. Instead, it dropped its triple-A cards on the table, looked its core fans in the eyes, and promised them the world. We’re swooning.

Every year we ask “who won E3?” with plunging levels of hope that anyone will emerge a clear victor. From a core perspective Microsoft, Sony and Nintendo have been fronting increasingly lacklustre shows as the generation has approached retirement; Activision barely bothers to turn up; and EA, while reliably equipped with a stack of games, tends to make its reveals externally.

When we get together and place bets in the lead up to the show, those are the names we bandy about. But next year, we’ll probably extend the book to cover Ubisoft. And you won’t get very good odds betting against them.

Ubisoft has a strong catalogue of core intellectual property, something that’s easy to forget when the French publisher is spamming out reboots for a hardware launch. For all its family and casual friendly activities – remember that it opened its show with a Just Dance 4 showcase – Ubisoft seems to be the only major E3 attendee willing to speak directly to the core.

While Sony devoted 20 minutes to an AR Harry Potter book, Microsoft hooked Apple devices to its consoles, and Nintendo gave an exhaustively detailed look at a collection of casual mini-games in a social network setting, Ubisoft got right down to business. Its energising but brief Just Dance 4 shenanigans out of the way, the publisher moved right onto Far Cry 3, one of the most curious and exciting products of the late 2012 slate.

Far Cry 2 is one of those divisive titles which fans will go to the grave defending. It’s sufficiently different to be both attractive and tremendously off-putting, depending on how you like your toast buttered, and Ubisoft seems to have captured the spirit of that in Far Cry 3, if not the substance. It certainly channeled controversy by showing a stage demo which begins with a sexual encounter; social media exploded with both praise and reprobation, and everything that followed was tinged by these reactions. The over-the-top gameplay which followed, not to mention host Aisha Tyler’s relatable but badly-received comment about shooting tigers, fuelled furious discussion. If Ubisoft’s intention was to make waves, it succeeded admirably – and what is E3 for, if not to generate buzz around products?

One core shooter down, Ubisoft transitioned neatly into another. The Splinter Cell: Blacklist presentation was short but sweet, because we’d already seen it at Microsoft’s press conference. It would have been silly to skip over the game completely, but again, Ubisoft showed it knows who it’s talking to by refusing to labour the point, skipping directly into the next main showcase – the Wii U.

Assassin’s Creed III. Raging moisty amirite.

The new hardware was one of the hot topics of the show and Ubisoft could have been forgiven for devoting more time to it, but instead popped out a rapid-fire look at Avengers: Battle for Earth – likely the most fringe of its launch titles – before tantalising with a good brief on Rayman: Legends. An effective bit of marketing introduced ZombiU with one of the coolest trailers of the show, and a quick montage skipped through the casual slate. Again, Ubi was speaking to the core, and the core doesn’t want to spend longer than a minute looking at Rabbids.

The time was better spent elsewhere. Ubisoft pulled out a lengthy Assassin’s Creed III demo showing off some key changes to the franchise, and then in what was perhaps its chanciest gamble, hosted a live 3v3 match of Shootmania Storm. This was the only point at which the presentation fell a little flat; although the core console and eSports demographics are increasingly overlapped, this is the kind of demo which would have been amazing as part of a tournament event, but proved a little baffling to the console crowd in attendance.

If you tuned out at that point, you were unlucky, because Ubisoft then did something nobody expected: it produced an entirely new IP out of nowhere, right at a time when “new” is as rare as hen’s teeth. Although what we’ve seen so far of Watch Dogs could probably be described as Assassin’s Creed with guns and gadgets – well, just say that out loud. It doesn’t sound bad at all, and later previews demonstrated the game’s clever use of interconnected mobile apps and social features as a serious differentiator from the rest of the triple-A scene.

A new IP? Wait, what? It’s 2012, right?

Having knocked half a dozen excellent core demos out of the park, Ubisoft had already won a huge number of points. For it to turn up later on in Sony’s press conference was the icing on the cake. On a business level, Sony may benefit the most from the Assassin’s Creed III and Far Cry 3 exclusives it announced – a jab in the eye at Microsoft’s frequent content coups – but it was we at home who got the immediate pay out. Seeing Far Cry 3′s co-operative multiplayer in action for the first time, as well as Assassin’s Creed III’s naval battles, has driven the hype up around both titles – and the announcement of Assassin’s Creed III: Liberation was arguably the best thing to happen to Vita owners all show.

Ubisoft was clever this year. The publisher has loads of digital, casual and social initiatives on the go, many of which are likely to prove important and successful, but it didn’t waste its E3 time talking about them. Instead, it dropped its triple-A cards on the table, looked its core fans in the eyes, and promised them the world. We’re swooning.

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61 Comments

  1. Edo

    Good article and yes,Ubisoft kicked everyone’s ass by giving people what they want….GAMES.

    #1 2 years ago
  2. The_Red

    “Watch Dogs could probably be described as Assassin’s Creed with guns and gadgets” seems to be the actual case. I think this game was conceived as prototype gameplay for a modern / near-future Assassin’s Creed game and later was turned into a different IP. Something like origin of Devil May Cry 1 from RE prototypes.

    #2 2 years ago
  3. TheBlackHole

    Despite all of this, you do all realise that it’s not the core audience that primarily funds this industry, don’t you?

    Now that CoD, FIFA, GTA et al do 15 million+ units, the ‘core’ is no longer as relevant as it used to be. In fact, there’s an argument to suggest that the core actually does more harm than good – they may evangelise some products (not all of which are successful), but they more often than that work to criticise others, rightly or wrongly.

    It’s nice that many of us still think we are important, though.

    #3 2 years ago
  4. Specialist89

    I agree with you Brenna, very good article. Ubisoft rocked the house. They were everywere, Sony, Nintendo, Microsoft: the hype ramped up when Ubisoft went on stage. It feels like they understood their errors just in time to rock the end of this generation.
    The final stage of a console life cycle is the best time to work on AAA titles, because you know how to handle the hardware and, supposedly, have the necessary resources to work on something good. The other publishers went on stage with commercial games, just to keep going while the generations ends. Ubisoft had enough bravery to develop a new IP and to improve the existing one.

    Now they just have to work on functional AIs. All Ubisoft games always have big flaws when it comes to artificial intelligence, but it’s too soon to judge.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. manamana

    @TBH It may not fund it but it pushes boundaries. Watch_Dogs wouldn’t be around without core. Dance titles on the other hand …

    #5 2 years ago
  6. KAP

    Many dont seem to realise that having one working demo of an unfinished game such as Assassins Creed 3 is headache enough but 4 demos running is staggering! You defo have to give it up to Ubisoft for that.

    They had the Navel demo, Frontier, Boston, and Multiplayer.
    Each one needs to be put through QA months in advanced by a seperate team whos working on finishing the game.

    Again, staggering work from Ubisoft and appreciate the Funny and generally surprising conference of all four press conferences.

    Oh and of all the haters of that black chick not doing a good job is pretty harsh considering she did a great job on what she had to work with shes a huge gamer too. Her facebook page has her chatting about her gaming history.. really really funny!

    KAP

    #6 2 years ago
  7. G1GAHURTZ

    LOL!

    You guys who camp out the blog comment sections and moan and whinge about new IPs are NOT the “core”.

    You are the <1% hardcore whingers!

    The “core” are the people who are hyped about the sequels of their favourite IPs, and who actually spend their time gaming (believe it or not!) rather than droning on about something ‘new’.

    “New, new, new. All new stuff that I’ve never seen before is good, and all ‘old’ and refined stuff is bad!”

    Gimmie a break, will you…

    The “core” are the ones who spend 200-500 hours gaming online, and buy all the DLC, subscriptions and specialist headsets, controllers and accessories.

    Not the ones who whinge, whinge, whinge all day long because they bought some 10 hour, SP only game from a franchise that fizzles out after it’s second iteration.

    Seriously, stop going on about E3. It’s like you were expecting someone to come and give you the keys to the holodeck or something.

    It’s just one event of many.

    Why don’t you go write an article attacking Rockstar for never bothering to show up there?

    #7 2 years ago
  8. viralshag

    @7, Comment of the day.

    Make him the president of something.

    And give him a slice of cake too.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. Ireland Michael

    @7 So apparently you’re not a core gamer anymore unless you spend excessive amounts of time online (an amount that isn’t realistic for most people with a family and a job), download tonnes of content which is often just deleted from the original game (which not everyone can afford even if it wasn’t), and want to pay for the exact same game over and over and over and over again.

    So basically, Giga thinks that the only true gamers are the ones like him. That’s pretty fucking funny in and of itself.

    #9 2 years ago
  10. viralshag

    @9, I don’t think he’s really that far off the mark to be honest. It depends on whose perspective you’re looking at it from.

    And I think Giga is kinda right. In my opinion “hardcore” are those that go above and beyond that of what “average” or “normal” gamers would and I believe his description fits that – whether it be time or money spent.

    Edit: Are “core” gamers the people that will buy one or two titles that they really look forward to and maybe a few others in a Steam sale or pre-owned?

    #10 2 years ago
  11. Panda

    @7 the only one who whinges is you

    Def give him a cake

    #11 2 years ago
  12. Gadzooks!

    #8

    Agreed, comment #7 is gospel.

    Forumites in general have a very hard time accepting that they are in a tiny, tiny minority when it comes to gaming, yet try to speak for everyone.

    You won’t hear the phrases ‘core’, ‘casual’, ‘new IP’ or any of that irrelevant shit outside forums because in the real world they don’t mean jack.

    Gamers, not forumites, shape and fund the games industry. And thank fuck for that because if forum concensus became publisher policy we’d have a dead games industry in a matter of months.

    Cake is in the post Giga. Hope you like buttercream!

    #12 2 years ago
  13. OlderGamer

    “The “core” are the people who are hyped about the sequels of their favourite IPs,”

    We talking Core-sheep here?

    I have said it before there is no such thing as core or casual. Just people that play games. And different people like different kinds of games.

    I mean on one hand I am a core gamer because i have thousands of hours on World of Warcraft. Hundreds on Civ V. And hundreds on Battlefield 3. Yet on the other hand I must be a casual gamer because I have completed two Kirby games, TSMBwii, enjoyed Mario Kart, have more digital arcade style downloaded games then full box AAA games, play tetris, plants vs Zombies, bejweled, and gasp – angry birds.

    I mean really at this point fellas can we throw the labels away? They really don’t mean a damn thing. The word core is so over used often by insecure gamers that need to not only identify with their games, but often insult other people that like different games.

    I am not pointing fingers, just pointing out it is a silly term. And honestly doesn’t really identify anyone.

    A gamer is a gamer, and enjoying different kids of games is ok. Why do people feel threatend by that?

    #13 2 years ago
  14. G1GAHURTZ

    This might seem obvious to intelligent people, but clearly the slower ones among us will take time to catch on…

    1. If you’re not putting the gaming hours in, you’re clearly not a core gamer, are you? You’re much better classed as a casual, whether you like it or not, because you only game briefly and occasionally.

    2. If you don’t find the money to fund your gaming hobby, you’re clearly not a core gamer, even if you want to be. There’s no point calling yourself a train spotter if you’ve never been to the train station, no matter how much you might like trains.

    3. core gamers don’t play the same game over and over again. Only people who are utterly devoid of any skill and have k/ds of the likes of 0.59 are incapable of distinguishing between what makes one version of a franchise different from the next.

    #14 2 years ago
  15. OlderGamer

    G1GA:

    1 Core gamers are addicts?

    2 Core gamers are rich(or in debt buying things they can’t afford)?

    3 But Core gamers need to becarful because playing too many different kinds of games can strip them of their core carrying card? Or it is that CoD fans aren’t core gamers?

    I am so confused. ;)

    All kidding aside, I am not a label fan. Most of the time preset labels don’t fit most people anyways. But it seems to me that if you must use labels then types of gamers should be grouped by what they enjoy rather the guidlines you wrote down.

    For example, if someone works 50 hours a week, has a spouse, or maybe even is a single Mom/Dad and because of those things can’t spend tons of hours playing but still enjoys traditional “core” titles, that doesn’t make that person a “casual” gamer.

    If someone is inbetween jobs due to company downsizing, and has to spend money on food, rent, bills, that doesn’t make that person a “casual” gamer.

    And honestly I know people that only play Halo. Others that just play Wow. And I am guessing more then a few that only play CoD. And what about those sick twisted EA sports fans(like me)?

    I am just pointing out, that labels just don’t work.

    #15 2 years ago
  16. OrbitMonkey

    Well not one to brag, but me & OG must be the hardest of the Core. Our combined years of gaming put all you little whipper snappers to shame!!

    *fist bump OG*

    #16 2 years ago
  17. Ireland Michael

    @14 Yeah, we can safely say you’re completely full of shit.

    Good god, I’ve met kids with more maturity and less self-serving egos than you.

    @15 You’re not a core gamer unless you buy countless rehashed sequels and buy tatty branded merchandise O.G. JUST ADMIT IT TO YOURSELF!

    You have to have unlimited hours in your life, with no time for personal reaponsibilities, and waste countless amounts of money on stripped game content to be a core gamer O.G. ADMIT IT TO YOURSELF!

    Us married men and women aren’t core gamers. We have “responsibilites”. We don’t have the time or money. JUST ADMIT IT ALREADY!

    What a load of fucking horseshit. Seriously. I think there’s a word for people this self obsessed (beside “idiot”) with their own ideological world view, but I can’t put my finger on it.

    @16 Mind if I join that fist pump? I recently turned 30. =(

    #17 2 years ago
  18. G1GAHURTZ

    @OG:

    1. The initial example that I gave was 200-500 hours online. I didn’t mention whether that was on one game or on many. However, if we take the lower value that I gave, then that works out at just over 30 minutes per day over the course of the year.

    That’s hardly addiction. Most smokers probably spend more than 30 minutes per day burning tobacco between their fingers, so how can someone who considers themself a gamer not find 3.5 hours in the week do spend on their hobby?

    2. OG, you of all people, who at one stage had not one, not two, not even three, but FOUR xbox 360′s and a range of other consoles in the same house can say that DLC is too expensive for an average gamer to buy.

    3. Being a core gamer isn’t a label that you slap on yourself because you like it. Core gamers are the vast majority that are the essence of the industry. Without them, the industry falls apart. So basically, if you do certain things, you fit into that category.

    #18 2 years ago
  19. G1GAHURTZ

    Reverting to type, O’Connor?

    Can’t admit the blatant facts, so you just resort to going into a rage and spraying your toilet mouth all over the place…

    The irony is that you’ve managed to delude yourself into believing that you’re actually ‘mature’.

    Grow up kid.

    #19 2 years ago
  20. Ireland Michael

    @19 Indeed.

    Rage? Lawl. The Irish would eat your for breakfast if you think this is “rage”.

    Only an idiot thinks cursing is a sign of a lack or intelligence or maturity.

    #20 2 years ago
  21. OlderGamer

    I was just goofing with ya G1GA on the list of three things, sorry humor is hard to convey with online posts. But I did stick a smiley in here!! Bagh good for nothing smiley.

    I do disagree with you(and a lot of others) on the need for and over use of the words core and casual tho. I was using myself and the games I have an an example of why those labels don’t work.

    In a nintendo thread I am king casual old man.

    In a BF thread I am a fanboy.

    Been called everything from xbot to sony sheep.

    And that is my biggest point. The label core is often used to alienate as much as group up. And the word casual is often used to insult. These things are basicly just toys(video games), and playing one rather then another doesn’t earn anyone credence or much of anything. Just a person that enjoys a toy.

    Labels = bad. Imo.

    #21 2 years ago
  22. Ireland Michael

    There’s nothing wrong with labels. The only problem comes when you try to narrow too tightly what they mean.

    Core gamer = Someone whose considers gaming one of their main hobbies and plays when they can.

    Casual gamer = Someone who plays few games, as an infrequent distraction.

    See? Nice and fucking simple.

    #22 2 years ago
  23. Deacon

    @22 It really is as simple as that.

    #23 2 years ago
  24. OlderGamer

    Those labels would work for me, Mike.

    There isn’t any insults in their use.

    Dedicated, avid gamer. Ocasional gamer.

    #24 2 years ago
  25. Ireland Michael

    @23 Not according to some people.

    @24 I see nothing wrong with labels. People for some stupid fucking reason though use them to view people in a limited sense, instead of a broad sense.

    #25 2 years ago
  26. G1GAHURTZ

    O’Connor, you’re clearly getting into a rage because you know you’re wrong, but you’re to ignorant to even admit it to yourself.

    That’s why poo-poo mouth starts pebble dashing your screen.

    The word core has a clear and obvious definition that was established long before you, with your measley 30 years of age, were even born.

    It’s quite simple.

    If you don’t spend money on games, and you don’t spend your time playing games, you cannot be described as “core” according to the well established rules of the English language.

    Self consideration has absolutely NOTHING to do with it.

    But you continue to live in your own immature, fairytale land, where you can invent your own gobbledygook language with it’s own definitions and enjoy yourself.

    Internet rage boy!

    LOL!

    #26 2 years ago
  27. ManuOtaku

    I only will ask how avid gamers start?, like casuals, then when your tastes,skill,likings, evolve then you become a more akin to an avid gamer, but i dont think playing time and money expending on the hobby has anything to do with this, an neither for that matter being here, the thing is you can play games for thirty minutes to 4 hours a day, or even more, as long as you play what you like, you have fun, and think about the game you did play, becuase at the end of the day an avid gamer, as he/she did evolve in gaming also evolve in life, getting married getting a job, etc, therefore the playing time it will end up being more shorter and shorter, but at his core he is still an avid gamer, that play less but even then he enjoys the same things as he did enjoy before.

    This also applys to money expeding in the hobby you like, of course one can say if you spend more you are more of an avid than a casual, but heres the thing, if you put your money on new IP,s games that break the mold, and you end up buying only 5 tittle a years, because your evolution in life, like i did mention in the above point, makes you have less money, you are supporting the industry in the same level as an avid gamer that can expend money on 14 tittles a year, for instance, where 14 of those tittles are all sequels, because both are supporting the industry where is needed the most, in different games and the anual iteration games, therefore even if the quantity is different the support for the industry is on the same level, quantiy has not much to with this, instead how you support the industry in order to try to make it better, not the same thing.

    So to sum things up, theres a lot of factors here to only say the avid gamer is just the one the expends 200-500 hour playing games and that pays 1000$ a year for games, because the line between casual and avid is a fine line, because casuals became Avid at some point, and Avid became Casual at some point, for the reasons stated above.

    p.s People seems to forget that life is not black or white, greys do also exist, just because you have a definition of a thing doesnt make everything fall into that category, because just as life, they are factors that incide on something, and for that the things that do apply change, because of the variables involve.

    #27 2 years ago
  28. Ireland Michael

    @26 I can’t admit something that isn’t the case. You must have a very limited view on human psychology if you think that the presence of cursing is an indicative sign of some form of anger.

    If laughing is “rage”, I’m the fucking Hulk right now. I’m cursing because I’m so fucking blown away by what I’m reading that I can’t even begin to comprehend the amount of ego that must be invested in it. Its mind blowing.

    @27 “because the line between casual and avid is a fine line.”

    I agree with most of what you’re saying, but there really isn’t a thin line between the two at all. People are simply over-thinking it and letting their own egos define what is valid.

    Core = Someone who games as a hobby.
    Casual = Someone who doesn’t game as a hobby.

    Its really, really, really simple.

    #28 2 years ago
  29. OlderGamer

    I always find it funny manu, that so many of the games that built this industry would now be called casual game experiences. Man I must have put several hundreds(maybe more) into Pacman machines back in the day. Or Pinball machines.

    #29 2 years ago
  30. viralshag

    Blimey, if 30 is the age of the “older gamer” I imagine that’s quite a few of us in there then. I’ve not hit the GREAT BIG SCARY DEPRESSING age of 30 yet, but I’m closer than I would like to be.

    WHAT HAVE I DONE WITH MY LIFE?! THANKS FOR NOTHING VIDEO GAMES!

    #30 2 years ago
  31. OlderGamer

    “GREAT BIG SCARY DEPRESSING age of 30 yet,”

    Bagh 30 isn’t old, just a milestone. You start to feel old when you begin thinking of anyone under 30 as still a kid.

    #31 2 years ago
  32. TheBlackHole

    @22

    So by that defenition someone who plays angry birds and song pop every day, along with Sims 3 on Facebook, is a CORE gamer?

    Mmm, not sure that fits.

    Core and Casual aren’t sufficient descriptors anymore, as there are too many types of gaming and too many people that aren’t traditional ‘GAMERS’ that invest time and money into newer forms of game experiences.

    The industry has been blown wide open and some of you are still talking about it like we’re all 12yr old boys with sega megadrives.

    The world has moved on without you.

    #32 2 years ago
  33. viralshag

    I was only kidding… I’m not that worried about it. I have video games to keep me forever young.

    #33 2 years ago
  34. Ireland Michael

    @31 I think 90% of the people I witness, meet or know as kids. Does that count?

    @32 “So by that defenition someone who plays angry birds and song pop every day, along with Sims 3 on Facebook, is a CORE gamer?”

    That sounds almost exactly like my gaming regime right now.

    Angry Birds is a perfectly valid video game. Feel free to try and argue why it isn’t.

    ” The industry has been blown wide open and some of you are still talking about it like we’re all 12yr old boys with sega megadrives.”

    And in twenty years time, the industry will have moved on from you.

    I’m certainly no nostalgic hippie though. I think gaming is better now than its ever been. I think we’re spoilt for choice and quality.

    #34 2 years ago
  35. G1GAHURTZ

    becuase at the end of the day an avid gamer, as he/she did evolve in gaming also evolve in life, getting married getting a job, etc, therefore the playing time it will end up being more shorter and shorter, but at his core he is still an avid gamer, that play less but even then he enjoys the same things as he did enjoy before.

    But Manu, look at the example I used before. If someone loves trains, but never goes to the station, or the tracks, is he a train spotter?

    Of course not. He hasn’t spotted any trains, so he doesn’t meet the definition.

    You can’t become a Man Utd player just by wearing a replica kit and playing at the local park once or twice every summer.

    If you’re too busy to game, have other responsibilities, or just don’t have the money, how can you honestly consider yourself a core gamer?

    #35 2 years ago
  36. Ireland Michael

    @35 Because they’re still first and foremost your favourite interest and the thing you *want* to do when you have the time?

    Good god, could you be any more of an elitist snob? Rhetorical question; you most certainly could.

    “You can’t become a Man Utd player just by wearing a replica kit and playing at the local park once or twice every summer.”

    No, but you’ll still watch what matches you can when you have the time and keep track of how they’re doing as often as possible.

    #36 2 years ago
  37. ManuOtaku

    #28 so when the casual is playing videogames, is not doing a hobby?, i dont understand that Michael, because a hobby is when you entertein yourself on timely basis, and for that the casual is doing a hobby too.

    #37 2 years ago
  38. G1GAHURTZ

    O’Connor, I’m actually giving you credit here.

    The only reason that someone uses foul language if they’re not actually angry is because they have such a low IQ that they are unable to develop a large enough vocabulary to express themselves in an intelligent way.

    So I’m going to take that credit that I gave you back, and consider you to be one of those simple minded people from now on.

    Carry on raging.

    #38 2 years ago
  39. viralshag

    @35, “If you’re too busy to game, have other responsibilities, or just don’t have the money, how can you honestly consider yourself a core gamer?”

    This is the part I agree with.

    You can talk about having kids and other responsibilities all you want. I don’t have some of that at the moment, so I have the time to put countless hours into gaming and so I consider myself “core”.

    When the time comes I don’t have the time or money to invest I will happily say “I was” a core gamer. I just get the feeling that some people want to hold onto that label when they actually no longer do fit the description of what a “hardcore” gamer is.

    Nothing wrong with getting older and admitting you don’t have as much time to game as the “kids” do.

    #39 2 years ago
  40. G1GAHURTZ

    When the time comes I don’t have the time or money to invest I will happily say “I was” a core gamer. I just get the feeling that some people want to hold onto that label when they actually no longer do fit the description of what a “hardcore” gamer is.

    I think you hit the nail on the head, right there.

    +1

    #40 2 years ago
  41. G1GAHURTZ

    @36:

    wanting to do something means nothing.

    You cannot become a High Court Judge, by simply wanting to be.

    You have to fit the criteria.

    How are you not able to understand this oh, so basic concept?

    Also, there’s a big difference between being a player and supporting a club. But I suppose, being as clueless about football as you are, you probably didn’t know that…

    #41 2 years ago
  42. ManuOtaku

    #35 But Manu, look at the example I used before. If someone loves trains, but never goes to the station, or the tracks, is he a train spotter?

    He could see the trains in other forms not only directly in the train station, he can gaze them in pictures, or drawing the trains, or collecting train toys etc,i think he/she not only has to have an specific interation with the things he like, i mean going to the train station and touch them like a said theres to many things and variables.

    In games i think is the same the only thing that matter if is you entertein yourself, in an x amount of time, and money spent, now for instance think, is someone is paying you to play games, but you dont like games that makes you an avid gamer, lets say you are being paid 5.000 $ for playing 1000 hours a year, and then there is a gamer, a person that plays 20 hours becuase he loves games, but not so much because he/she doesnt have the time?, which one of you is a real avid gamer?

    Therefore Like i said the key here is not the time or the amount of money spent in your likings, is the enterteinment and love you have and put at the moment in which you are spending that time with, short or long, it doesnt matter really, the thing is the enterteinment and love puting into it

    #42 2 years ago
  43. Ireland Michael

    @37 As an adult, with a family of your own and a job to manage and responsibilities to constantly take care of, a few hours a week *is* a “timely manner”. It doesn’t mean someone isn’t invested. It simply means they have bigger priorities.

    I cook. I clean. I spend time with my mother because she’s old and I want to help her with things. I spend time with my wife because she works 50 hour weeks. I’m lucky if get an hour of gaming a day, and its often with the kids.

    But I still buy the latest tech, the latest games, and play 90% of them to completion. I follow gaming news like a hawk. How exactly am I not a core gamer?

    @38 Yep, you’re a fucking idiot.

    @39 Most of us have said “core gamer”, not “hardcore gamer”. “Hardcore” implies something else entirely.

    #43 2 years ago
  44. FireFly

    So um…no one thinks Sony did good? (Not to take anything away from Ubi)

    #44 2 years ago
  45. G1GAHURTZ

    @ Manu:

    If it’s his job, then he’s a professional gamer, not a core gamer.

    He fits into another definition.

    Sure, it’s possible that he doesn’t really care about the games he’s playing, but that’s a different subject.

    If the other person really does love games, I’m sure he can find an hour or so every one or two days, and maybe a few on the weekend before he goes to bed or at some other convenient time to play them.

    #45 2 years ago
  46. TheBlackHole

    @Ireland Michael

    Erm, I think you misunderstood me. I never said that playing angry birds doesn’t make you a gamer, I said that you can’t simply assume that EVERYONE who plays lots of iOS/FB games regularly is a CORE gamer. There are too many genres and formats, and even blurred lines between games and interactive experiences (that can’t really be called a ‘game’) to simply assume that lots of time spent gaming = core gamer, and infrequent game time = casual.

    I’m what I would consider to be a ‘core’ gamer who (now that I have a child) has less time to play than I used to. Does that make me a ‘casual’ gamer? I don’t really like ‘casual’ games, I like what you would call ‘core’ experiences. Are we getting confused here between core gaming (in terms of time spent as a hobby) and core GAMES (in terms of product)? The definition is used for both and makes things very confusing.

    Also,

    “And in twenty years time, the industry will have moved on from you.”

    Not that I would refute the allegation – you’re probably right, but what’s your point?

    #46 2 years ago
  47. G1GAHURTZ

    You’re just a kid, O’Connor.

    You should have been banned a long time ago.

    #47 2 years ago
  48. Ireland Michael

    @38 I think Stephen Fry says it far more bloody eloquently than I could ever be fucking bothered to: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s_osQvkeNRM

    @46 Faceboom games? No. Those are barely games. iOS games? Most certainly. I don’t see how its any different to someone who plays the DS / 3DS primarily.

    ” Not that I would refute the allegation – you’re probably right, but what’s your point?”

    That those who grew up with the Mega Drive and Super Nintendo are no less “core” than those who grew up with Call of Duty or Assassin’s Creed, as you seem to be implying.

    #48 2 years ago
  49. ManuOtaku

    $45 I agree he is a professional gamer, but then you have the other person in the example that plays 20 hours without being paid, he is not getting money,and amateur so to speak, therefore they only thing that motivates him is the enterteinment value of it, and or the love if you will, so again which one do cares more for games?, and thats the point i did understand you, that spending money and more time means you are a core gamer, therefore more dedicated into gaming than a casual one, so if i dont make myself clear, the thing is not the x amount of time and money the things that really matters, is the joy of doing that, and that is the very definition of Hobby, therefore both have the same hobby, a hobby that both loves,and loves and joy are they key factors, not money or time.

    #49 2 years ago
  50. G1GAHURTZ

    No way I’m clicking on one of your links.

    #50 2 years ago
  51. OrbitMonkey

    In all fairness, who actually goes around saying their a core gamer? Not exactly a title to impress the ladies is it?

    #51 2 years ago
  52. Ireland Michael

    @51 Hey, it worked for my wife.

    #52 2 years ago
  53. ManuOtaku

    #51 well a core ladie would be impress don you think?, unless you are not counting them as girls 8D

    #53 2 years ago
  54. G1GAHURTZ

    @ Manu:

    I think we might be getting some definitions confused here.

    Being a core gamer means that you are part of what makes up the most important part of the industry. It means that you are effectively what supports and keeps the industry running, so to speak.

    Core gamers, like the tens of millions who play the FPSs and the MMOs and the RTSs are the ones who put the vast majority of money into the (core) industry.

    Without these people, it could easily be argued that both the 360 and the PS3 would have been canned long, long ago.

    You cannot support a reasonably priced console and come up with new IPs from sales of 1-2 million from your best selling games.

    Now lets imagine, for one moment, that we all decided that we were too busy to buy and play games.

    All 40-50 million (quick guess) of the gamers in the world said: Hey, I love and care about games, but I’m too busy ‘having a life’ these days.

    The industry would be destroyed!

    So caring is irrelevant. How you consider yourself is irrelevant.

    If you’re not supporting the industry, you’re not a core gamer. You might love games, and you might be on a gaming website every day, but you’re not what makes up the most important part of the industry.

    The industry doesn’t need these people, and if they all stopped gaming tomorrow, almost nothing would change.

    #54 2 years ago
  55. ManuOtaku

    #54 Look your point of view of core is for ,what i do understand, is the person who supports the industry, buying all things, which holds some true, but my point is that this doesnt have anything to do with the fact that casuals will becoming core in the process, they will do the same things either way as they do evolve, in fact the chances are they will do it in the same maner as the core, therefore think this way, casuals in the short term will not support the industry like the core,which is true, but when they do evolve to become more akin to a core gamer, in the long term, they will do, think of them like the future of the industry, we need a healthy balance of casuals keep coming to the fray with each generation to avoid stagnation, becuase in the end the old core gamers will stop supporting the industry the way the did for various reasons, therefore we need the new blood, the casuals, they are the seed that later transform into a plant, to spread seeds again, thats my point, we all started as casuals, in fact in any hobby you can think off, they will start as casuals and then , as they become more entertein with the hobby, therefore loving more the hobby, they do become core, or avid, or harcore, or whatever is called this days.
    p.s therefore a separation between ourselfs is rather silly, because in the end we love the same things, we are being enterteint by the same things, and support they way we can the same thing, again is kind of pointless the disgregation.

    #55 2 years ago
  56. TheBlackHole

    “That those who grew up with the Mega Drive and Super Nintendo are no less “core” than those who grew up with Call of Duty or Assassin’s Creed, as you seem to be implying.”

    I’ve no idea how you got that from what I said.

    The implication is actually that the terms ‘core’ and ‘casual’ were relevant ten-twenty years ago. Now they are outdated and irrelevant. that’s all.

    #56 2 years ago
  57. Gadzooks!

    @56

    I don’t think those terms were relevant back then either. It wasnt until this gen that I’d even heard core/casual mentioned.

    It only used to be ‘games’ and ‘gamers’. It still is as far as I’m concerned.

    #57 2 years ago
  58. Panda

    Kindergarten LOL

    #58 2 years ago
  59. fearmonkey

    @54 – right on the money with your definition of core.

    Ubisoft came along way since Mr. Caffeine, they were the shining light in the darkness of mediocrity at this years E3. Sony impressed me too though, besides that horrible decision to spend 20 mins discussing wonderbook, they really were all about the games..

    MS came out and said “here are some sequels and entertainment apps” and bored everyone to tears.

    Nintendo had the least exciting reveal of a new console that I can remember…. Seriously…

    #59 2 years ago
  60. farcry3

    I love the quote “haters make you famous” and it couldn’t be more true with Ubisoft’s approach to creating a buzz about the new Far Cry 3 game. Killing tigers and sexual encounters, that’s offensive to some but undeniably buzz-worthy. Sex sells and if you can exploit that tastefully than why wouldn’t they!
    This has inspired me to write a post about his topic at Far Cry 3 Pre Order.

    Great post!

    #60 2 years ago
  61. OlderGamer

    Geez, 60 posts, most of them on the marrits of how to define what it means to be a core gamer or not.

    What a bunch of nerds, each and everyone one of us that posted on this thread. Some of us must be bigger nerds, because we(like me) posted multi times haha!

    #61 2 years ago

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