Sections

Commodore founder Jack Tramiel passes away aged 83

Tuesday, 10th April 2012 05:03 GMT By Brenna Hillier

Jack Tramiel, the man behind one of the most important companies in the personal computing revolution, died over the weekend.

Forbes reports Tramiel passed on Sunday, in the company of his loved ones. He was 83, and is survived by wife Helen and three sons.

Tramiel was notably quick to embrace change and new technology, transitioning his company from a typewriter repair firm to the computing powerhouse of the 1980′s.

The Commodore 64, which released in 1982, which remains the best-selling PC of all time. It was one of the first popular, affordable home computers, and inspired countless programmers and designers, as well as introducing a whole new generation to games like Bomb Jack and Granny’s Garden. Press play on tape, et cetera.

Post-Commodore Tramiel helped save the Atari brand after the great video game crash, releasing several lines of PCs and consoles, ending with the Lynx and the Jaguar, both of which bowed out of he console arms races with honourable mentions.

Thanks, GiantBomb. [image]

Latest

3 Comments

  1. Blerk

    No comments? Tch, you youngsters!

    Farewell, Jack – a true industry legend. Even though I was on the other side of the 8-bit micro battlefront. ;)

    #1 2 years ago
  2. barchetta

    Maybe a result of my youthful innocence back in ’83, with teenage angst just around the corner but I had the impression Tramiel was ancient even then, so was surprised but certainly saddened to read of his passing. Maybe it was simply a side effect of poor repro standards of some 8-bit mags but his grainy face is forever imprinted on me. He was indeed a legend.

    Loft ladders at the ready, a memorial session with the beige brick is in order.

    #2 2 years ago
  3. sb319

    “the man behind one of the most important companies in the personal computing revolution”

    Erm, two of the most important companies. Did you forget about Atari?

    #3 2 years ago

Comments are now closed on this article.