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Confirmed: GAME to not stock Mass Effect 3 for launch

Wednesday, 29th February 2012 11:13 GMT By Johnny Cullen

GAME will not stock Mass Effect 3 for its launch next week, the retailer has confirmed to VG247 in a statement this afternoon as the retailer’s recent woes sadly continue.

A Eurogamer report first broke the news this morning.

Refunds will be given, as well as £5 of reward points if you visit a GAME store between March 1 and March 16. Online pre-orders will also be offered an online voucher for the offer.

A statement reads: “We currently have a supply issue with regards to Mass Effect 3, which means that GAME and gamestation will not be able to fulfil orders for Mass Effect 3 at this time. We want to give customers as much notice about this as possible and provide them with a range of options ahead of launch.

“We appreciate that this is disappointing for our customers, and we apologise sincerely for the inconvenience that this will cause. We value the loyalty of our customers very highly and as a gesture of goodwill we are providing the following:

  • Customers who have pre-ordered in store, will have the opportunity to add £5 worth of Reward points to their card if they visit us from 1st March through to 16th March 2012.
  • Customers who have placed a deposit for the title* will receive a refund as well as the £5 worth of Reward points between 1st – 16th March 2012.
  • Customers who have pre-ordered online, will be provided with an online voucher to the value of £5 to be spent on any purchase on our sites.

“For more information we would advise customers to visit EA www.ea.com/uk/masseffect3update on how to get hold of Mass Effect 3.”

The last EA title the chain will stock will be SSX on Friday, according to EG. VG247 can confirm dispatch emails have been sent out on the game, having personally received one this morning.

IGN‘s gone live with what it says is a memo from GAME HQ, penned by UK channel director Tom Devine that explains the move.

“We committed to only stocking products on which we could get the right credit terms, regardless of the title or the supplier. We will not stock products if the terms are not right for our business – we will not sacrifice long-term credit requirements for short term sales opportunities,” the memo reads.

“As a result of us taking this position – a position that we believe is critical to our long term health as a business – we have taken the very difficult decision to not stock EA’s March releases, including Mass Effect 3.

“As a specialist retailed dedicated to games and gaming, it is never easy to make a decision not to stock a title, particularly one with such a strong fan base. But it is imperative that we treat every supplier evenly, that we stick to our commitments, and tar we didn’t sign up to payment terms that will hamper us further in the future.”

Another part of the memo has come to light via EG that shows that deposits and orders on FIFA Street, Tiger Woods PGA Tour 13 and The Sims 3: Showtime will no longer be accepted.

This is not the first time its had issues on stocking games following ongoing issues at the retailer. It was unable to stock the Ubisoft launch line-up for PlayStation Vita until this week, and pulled orders of Wii RPG The Last Story at near the eleventh hour.

Another Nintendo title, Mario Party 9, isn’t being stocked for release this week, according to EG.

We’re getting onto EA right now. The BioWare RPG launches next Friday in the UK for PS3, 360 and PC.

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62 Comments

  1. Hell-Raiser-85

    This cant be good.

    #1 2 years ago
  2. silkvg247

    How can they still be in business?

    #2 2 years ago
  3. daytripper

    does this go for gamestation aswell? i have a lot of store credit for gamestation, whats going on ffs

    #3 2 years ago
  4. Colin Gallacher

    IGN have a GAME Staff Memo concerning the situation

    http://media.ign.com/games/image/article/121/1219655/game-will-not-be-stocking-mass-effect-3-20120229031449252.jpg

    @2 – I think they’re circling the drain.

    #4 2 years ago
  5. Razor

    Well this doesn’t look good.

    #5 2 years ago
  6. bobiroka

    This is fucking outrageous. I had the N7 Collector’s Edition pre-ordered!!!

    #6 2 years ago
  7. Colin Gallacher

    @6 – You can now order it from Amazon, Play, Zavvi and ShopTo.

    #7 2 years ago
  8. Benjo1981

    I guess this (i.e. Game not stocking several significant new releases) hints at just how much money Game must make from second-hand sales; I don’t see how they can survive long if they keep failing to stock these big new releases.

    #8 2 years ago
  9. bobiroka

    Thanks Colin.

    I just cancelled my order at Game and pre-ordered at Play for the same price. Couldn’t find it on Amazon or ShopTo and it was over £100 at Zavvi.

    I find this a great shame, cos I was looking forward to earning the loyalty points and confident my order would arrive on time… now I’m not so sure :(

    #9 2 years ago
  10. Razor

    Eurogamer now saying Mario Party 9 won’t be stocked.

    #10 2 years ago
  11. Benjo1981

    @10 Here’s the link to that: http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-02-29-game-group-not-stocking-mario-party-9

    #11 2 years ago
  12. Razor

    ^cheers

    I feel bad for GAME’s employees. This must be a super shit position to be in.

    #12 2 years ago
  13. Eregol

    Eurogamer have got pics of the internal memo
    http://www.eurogamer.net/articles/2012-02-29-revealed-games-memo-to-staff-on-mass-effect-3-cancellation

    #13 2 years ago
  14. Benjo1981

    Could Game downsize and rely more on second-hand sales?

    #14 2 years ago
  15. Joe Musashi

    I’m sure they’ll be stocking second hand versions of the game.

    JM

    #15 2 years ago
  16. viralshag

    I was in a GAME store the other weekend and the employee had a pretty bleak outlook for the future of the franchise.

    He said along the lines they were receiving “little to no stock of new games” and that he has “no idea of what’s going to happen with the company”.

    I know a lot of people have issues with GAME but I’ve always had a decent relationship with them and found I always got a pretty decent trade in with my consoles and games.

    I would be sad to see my local store shut down as that would mean I have no stores locally that stock movies, music or games… considering HMV shut down too.

    #16 2 years ago
  17. absolutezero

    If Game goes it takes down gamestation with it. Gameplay.co.uk has already gone (true just like Game itself it was a shadow of what it used to be). I just do not see this as a positive in any way.

    I remember when Game used to be packed with games, it was a massive library of titles for all the platforms. With this current generation its died on its arse.

    #17 2 years ago
  18. Deacon

    GREED.

    That is all.

    #18 2 years ago
  19. daytripper

    Looks like I’ll go down to my local gamestation and use the remaining credit on point cards or something, mass effect 3 was the only game I intend on buying until Max Payne is released.

    #19 2 years ago
  20. Patrick Garratt

    Just woke up to this. Really not good at all.

    #20 2 years ago
  21. Dark

    Well then , GAME over

    #21 2 years ago
  22. Eregol

    This is trending on Twitter. Must be big news.

    #22 2 years ago
  23. Rennie189

    Not purchased anything from GAME for 2 years, I prefer CEX personally, so can’t really say anything good or bad about them. Hopefully EA, Nintendo and GAME can play nice and get along.

    #23 2 years ago
  24. BraveLilCrumpet

    I think this will be the final nail in the coffin for GAME, all they need to do now is bury the remains.

    GAME can’t survive in it’s current outfit. It’s like going to your local cinema and them not playing any new films or blockbusters.

    *Edited to keep Colin happy :p

    #24 2 years ago
  25. Eregol

    If this doesn’t kill Game, then the loss of consumer confidence will.
    Game used to be known for getting the exclusive deals, and the Coll Eds. If they can’t offer that, can’t offer the lowest price and can’t even get the stock why would anyone pre-order?
    This could very well be the end.

    #25 2 years ago
  26. OrbitMonkey

    Can’t wait for their closing down sales…

    #26 2 years ago
  27. Colin Gallacher

    @24 – I think it’s more, GAME can’t survive in it’s current outfit.

    #27 2 years ago
  28. Eregol

    Gamestop have swooped and straight away put their pre-order ME3 coll eds and Mario party 9 headlines.
    They did the same thing last week with Last Story.

    #28 2 years ago
  29. BraveLilCrumpet

    @28 – That was there last night dude. Have you seen the price too? £43 for the standard edition!

    #29 2 years ago
  30. Eregol

    @29 Shouldn’t have been there last night. It was only announced today wasn’t it?
    What I’m talking about is their Twitter and Facebook pimping. This news came out and BOOM! Gamestop drum up trade on the back of bad news.
    Very canny.

    #30 2 years ago
  31. BraveLilCrumpet

    I thought you meant their main website, sorry bout that.

    You’re probably right, not sure what I make of Gamestop yet, they charged me for my Diablo 3 CE without telling me, lovely surprise bill of £55 on my credit card statement this morning…

    #31 2 years ago
  32. Colin Gallacher

    @24 Aww thank you :D

    #32 2 years ago
  33. Eregol

    @31 I know that feeling. I pre-ordered Batman: AC with them a while back and they actually charge the money for the game at the time of pre-order.
    Not ideal in my opinion, I guess it’s so they can use your cash as collateral to secure the stock maybe?
    If I have the money upfront I might consider them again, but at the moment I wouldn’t pre-order through them due to this rather bizarre way of doing it.

    #33 2 years ago
  34. freedoms_stain

    I suppose they’re just lucky it’s not a CoD or FIFA game. They can survive Mass Effect, they can survive The Last Story, but not indefinitely, every missed pre order is another blow to their tattered reputation.

    #34 2 years ago
  35. Eregol

    Just placed an order with game.co.uk….. Throwing caution to the wind baby!!!

    #35 2 years ago
  36. DrDamn

    Zavvi just sent me an email saying “double points on all EA Games inc. Mass Effect 3 CE”. It’s like watching vultures. They have also brought the price down in line with other places.

    #36 2 years ago
  37. stockops3

    With all the bad things said, im gonna miss game, my local game/gamestation where very nice and committed to there job, and where always there to help myself, its either remove all the stores and go online only (a la Zavvi) or try to keep UK stores open and close international branches, but the future is bleak, bleak indeed :(

    #37 2 years ago
  38. TheWulf

    Mind if I play devil’s advocate for a moment?

    Okay, so what I’ve heard essentially is that brick & mortar stores are having troubles staying afloat because of publisher greed, which exceeds any amount of greed from the retailer themselves. It’s almost as though publishers are pushing the digital frontier to try and kill off retailers.

    When you look at how much a retailer pays per game (which, again, as I’ve heard is near what you pay), and then you look at how tax has to come out of that, and then how the price of the game has to decrease over time from the RRP just so that they can remain competitive… it’s not a good deal for them. And publishers just aren’t interested in dropping the price that they charge brick & mortar stores.

    On top of this, everyone’s being hit by our current economic state. Brick & mortar stores are absolutely no exception to this. In the past they’ve had a pretty good situation with second hand sales – the way they view it is that once the initial wave of sales has gone to the publisher, second hand sales don’t hurt the publisher and allows them to remain afloat (even in economically difficult times).

    The choice to not stock titles with online passes is made because of this. And the interesting thing is is that it may not be an entirely idiotic decision. Think about it. The passes for previous games offered incentives for using the pass. This time? Below average multiplayer mode and DLC that you have to pay through the nose for.

    Now… this may not be a popular viewpoint, but I felt that the DLC for Mass Effect 2 was both a con (overpriced) and quite shit.

    I’m actually thankful that I didn’t buy any of the ME2 DLC. I watched videos of the story DLC and they didn’t really add anything at all, and the rest of it? Just cosmetic junk, or stuff that unbalanced the game. My interest in these things? Zero. Now here’s the thing: That seems to be the tactic for Mass Effect 3. So the DLC is uninteresting, the multiplayer mode is uninteresting…

    So why wouldn’t someone who has no compulsion toward multiplayer or DLC (perhaps due to being short on money, or due to Bioware having a far worse DLC history than even Bethesda with their horse armour) not wait a bit and buy a second hand copy from game? They’re getting exactly what they want – the single-player campaign, and nothing else.

    So if you look at it that way, this is an intelligent decision made by GAME. Because it cuts the publisher profits out of the equation whilst allowing them to reap second-hand sales. And EA did an incredibly, amazingly stupid thing with Mass Effect 3 in not adding incentives for actually buying it not previously owned. What they don’t realise is that for an avid single-player gamer, a multiplayer mode is not an incentive.

    So, to (I believe) the majority of gamers, a second hand version of ME3 is going to be every bit as good as the original shrink-wrapped version.

    Something to think about?

    #38 2 years ago
  39. GrimRita

    @38 Your points are valid. However, if a kid sends his/her mum to purchase this at their GAME/station store only to find its not in stock, it will only go on to damage what little credibility they have left.

    Now that Nintendo have also pulled the plug (see Eurogamer) clearly shows that the GAME boardroom have made so many enemies with their aggressive stance on pre-owned and, during the 90s essentially dictating terms of business and now the shoe is on the other foot, GAME dont like it and it will end up costing them their business and I will be amazed if they are here by Xmas.

    #39 2 years ago
  40. DSB

    @38 Most brick and mortar stores take 70% of the revenue from every sale. Steam takes 30%.

    It’s not greed though, it’s just economics. Brick and mortar has far higher expenses in terms of rent, salary and insurance, while likely catering to a far smaller audience than a website.

    One website that reaches everyone is always going to be more succesful than a hundred smaller stores that won’t reach as many.

    When you figure in the financial crisis, you’re also far less likely to be able to secure loans and capital with those kinds of expenses unless you have a very very good business. Currently brick and mortar isn’t a growth business, and the digital distributors are, so it’s fair to say that they’re backed into a corner.

    Video killed the radio star.

    #40 2 years ago
  41. Phoenixblight

    GAME just keeps hammering nails into their coffin. The game already has more preorders than ME2 and this company that is apparently dying because of their horrible choices continues to make horrible choices. This is just as bad as Hollywood video and Blockbuster refusing to get into streaming or redbox, which eventually lead to them claiming bankruptcy. Look at Gamestop, they know eventually everything will go digital and so they went and bought a digital retailer. Retailers can’t think that they will always sell movies, music and video games all these mediums can go digital and they are and every year more games are being sold digitally. SO become a part of the wave or be destroyed by the riptide that comes with it.

    #41 2 years ago
  42. DSB

    @41 Yup, Blockbuster syndrome all the way.

    If you ask me, Gamestop got into the game way too late as well though. Buying Impulse was a bit of a panic move.

    #42 2 years ago
  43. Phoenixblight

    @42

    I agree. Impulse was never really a big contender so I doubt that it will be enough to save Gamestop in the long run.

    #43 2 years ago
  44. Kuwabara

    Great news. Now you deluded ME fans can ponder about why mas effect 2 is the most over rated game of all time. If mass effect 2 was a 6.5/of 10, judging by the shitty me3 demo, it will be lucky to get a 5.

    #44 2 years ago
  45. LOLshock94

    i really cba to read this but can someone simply answer this question…will gamestation have it?

    #45 2 years ago
  46. Kabby

    No.

    #46 2 years ago
  47. revolting

    Much to my dismay this afternoon, I was one of the GAME preorderers. I can’t stand GAME, every single business practice they’ve pushed forward over the last year or two has been horrendous. I thought the entire shambles with their website relaunch resulting in cancelled preorders couldn’t be topped, but lo and behold, here we are. Granted in this instance the fault may lay at EA’s feet, it appears, but honestly, if this is the end of GAME, it’s long overdue. The only reason I preordered from them is that I had a load of points stored up from historic purchases from years ago before they turned to shit, and wanted to use them up on ME3 before backing away from them for good. (Not to mention that, at the time, they had exclusive rights to the Collector’s Edition.) Should’ve made the move sooner, I guess.

    Fortunately, I saw this story break while on my lunch hour at work, and quickly placed a new order at Amazon upon checking my GAME account to discover that my preorder has indeed been cancelled. What I find most disgusting about this entire debacle is the lack of communication from GAME about the situation. Yes they’ve issued a press release, and there’s a few things about it on their facebook page, but as a customer who had an order registered with them from months ago, I’ve received no direct communication from GAME to inform me that my order has been cancelled. Had I not checked the net on a whim at lunch time, I may never have known, and I shudder to think how many people who perhaps don’t visit gaming news websites often are now completely clueless about the cancellation of their preorder. Shocking customer service, and yet exactly the kind of thing GAME are reknowned for. While this current dilemma may not be entirely their fault, they (the business entity, not the individual employees) absolutely deserve to go tits up. I just wish it could have waited until after ME3.

    #47 2 years ago
  48. AHA-Lambda

    PS: the diablo 3 Collector’s edition is no longer GAME exclusive, just saw it on shopto’s website

    #48 2 years ago
  49. Cort

    And the internet kills another high street company.

    Do you know how much Amazon pays in UK corporation taxes every year on sales of many billions of pounds? Zero. Nothing. Not, a, penny. All of its profits are funnelled out of the UK without any charge from HMRC. And now another UK company will go down, councils will lose business rates, people will lose jobs, and high streets will continue to die so you can buy dirt cheap products from corporate tax evaders who are leeching our economy.

    Remember this next time you get a great deal online and whine about retail prices. And remember this those of you morons who complain about the bankers, Vodafone etc.

    #49 2 years ago
  50. Cort

    PS Amazon UK did pay some tax once. In 2007 it generously wrote a cheque to the UK taxpayer for the sum total of £19,367. Or to put that another way, about what an average married working couple pays a year in income tax and National Insurance.

    Crush the bankers!!!!

    #50 2 years ago
  51. DSB

    I don’t know anything about UK tax rules, but Amazon does pay VAT, insurance and business rates. That’s a bit more than zero.

    Most companies aren’t likely to pay more than they have to though. Call your local official.

    #51 2 years ago
  52. Froseidon

    @51 – Amazon don’t pay the standard British tax like GAME / Gamestation. They, like play, ship from Jersey, which although being part of the British Isle, doesn’t have the same taxes. It tends to be cheaper, something GAME / Gamestation never took advantage of, so they paid higher taxes all this time whereas its competitors paid far lower costs.

    Although if I remember correctly, that loop hole will soon be plugged up. I’m pretty sure it’s one of the ‘many’ discussions of out shitty government’s agenda.

    #52 2 years ago
  53. DSB

    @52 I haven’t used Play for a while, but last time I did they definitely didn’t pay VAT tax.

    I know that because I got slammed by customs and had to pay something like three times the worth of the game.

    My packages are usually dispatched from Amazon in Germany even though I’m ordering through Amazon.co.uk.

    I haven’t seen any from Jersey, but then I haven’t checked every single one.

    If society can’t support those businesses then it means that either those businesses have to adapt, or the society needs to help them. You can’t exactly blame Amazon for being smart, and not going down with the likes of Game or Gamestation.

    They do run two very different businesses though. It’s a bit hypocritial to go “Ooo, ain’t this a bargain” and then turn around and go “Y U NO PAY TAXES?!”. It’s one or the other.

    #53 2 years ago
  54. revolting

    @53 With Amazon where it comes from (and consequently how much tax they pay) largely depends on what item you’re buying. I don’t buy that many games from them (although no doubt will moving forward following this debacle) so I’m not sure about those, but I DO buy a lot of books and films from them. Most of the books come have come from the mainland, but all of the films (approximately 60 or so dvds/blurays over the last two years) have come from the isle of tax evasion that is Jersey. I would assume games are the same, but as I said, I have little experience with buying games from them.

    For anyone who is unaware, books of any description are zero-rated in the UK, so there’s no benefit to shipping them from elsewhere. Zero-rated is not the same as tax free, it just means the taxable amount is indefinitely set to zero. http://customs.hmrc.gov.uk/channelsPortalWebApp/channelsPortalWebApp.portal?_nfpb=true&_pageLabel=pageVAT_ShowContent&id=HMCE_CL_000102&propertyType=document I believe this is also the case in the States, which can largely be credited for the success of Amazon, which started out as a book store after all. Selling tax-free products is always going to be a winner. Other zero-rated goods include medical supplies and food, so Amazon is no more guilty of tax evasion than Greggs or Boots.

    However, you need to remember that purchasing tax (where it applies) is paid for by you, the buyer. So they’re actually doing you a favour selling from Jersey, unless customs decides to jerk you around at the post office when your package is delivered. (Which they are entirely entitled to do; it’s actually fairly shocking that it’s a rare inconvenience when importing goods rather than standard practice.)

    It all boils down to the age old argument of people hating paying taxes, but then moaning when they don’t get anything. Nothing is free, and if you want stuff, you have to pay for it. People were delighted when VAT was cut back, and then infuriated when the government cutbacks followed. Well, guess what; you pay less, you get less in return.

    #54 2 years ago
  55. Cort

    @51 I said corporation taxes. It should be paying at least 20% of its profits in corporation tax every year, IN ADDITION to the business rates and insurances (though not sure how the latter is supposed to be of great benefit to UK Plc given that it’s paid to private insurance companies of which many are non-UK based). That’s like saying you refuse to pay council tax because you paid your income tax: er, you’re supposed to pay both.

    And 99.9999% of the VAT paid from Amazon business transactions is paid by the person buying products from them! It is a consumption tax rated on purchasers, not sellers, so the only time Amazon UK pays VAT is when it itself buys in goods or services (that is, if it hasn’t found a way to exempt itself from that also). The disgraceful VAT loophole (soon to be closed) allowed them to drop prices even further on certain products up to a certain amount, thus harming bricks ‘n’ mortar even more and multiplying their tax-free profits.

    I don’t need to call my local official because I know what I’m talking about.

    “You can’t exactly blame Amazon for being smart, and not going down with the likes of Game or Gamestation.”

    I can and I will, just like UK taxpayers are baying for bankers’ blood for doing the same thing. I also blame consumers for being hypocrites. Industrial scale tax avoidance from corporate giants which kills off smaller competition and destroys employment and rips off the Exchequer is okay so long as it helps you get cheap games and books.

    #55 2 years ago
  56. Cort

    @54 This post is almost too muddled to understand let alone argue against. I’ll have a try on one point:

    “Other zero-rated goods include medical supplies and food, so Amazon is no more guilty of tax evasion than Greggs or Boots.”

    Totally wrong. You are confusing VAT with Corporation Tax, two completely different issues. Amazon avoids the latter on which it should be charged at least 20% on every pound of profit, and it is irrelevant for Amazon if a product is rated for VAT or not because it is YOU who pays that tax, not them! The VAT loophole let them sell DVDs, CDs and other VAT rated products for much less than the high street (which have to charge you VAT), which helped increase their profits even further … on which they pay not a penny in corporation tax.

    Remember this: your local independent games retailer – should you have one (unlikely) – could not take advantage of the VAT loophole and therefore had to charge you 17.5% (now 20%) in tax which Amazon didn’t, and if it made any profit at all in a financial year it paid more corporation taxes than the comparative behemoth that is Amazon UK who do several £billions in trade a year and many hundreds of millions in profits. So who deserves some sympathy and support?

    #56 2 years ago
  57. revolting

    @56 Neither. Neither deserve sympathy. They’re two entirely different business models with different pros and different cons, not charities that people should give to out of the goodness of their hearts. One of them turns a bigger profit and the other pays more back into the system, but ultimately, does that matter? Sorry if it sounds cold, but customers do not owe it to businesses to keep them afloat; businesses owe it to customers to provide a mutually beneficial service.

    Certainly the brick and mortar store is “better” for our economy as a whole, as it gives the most back into the system, but that just doesn’t matter to the average consumer. All they want is the best deal. It stinks, it screws up the bigger picture, but ultimately that’s all they want. And that’s neither GAME’s nor Amazon’s fault. These are businesses, not moral guardians of our national financial wellbeing.

    #57 2 years ago
  58. Cort

    “Other zero-rated goods include medical supplies and food, so Amazon is no more guilty of tax evasion than Greggs or Boots.”

    As it happens, Boots was bought by a private equity firm which moved it to Switzerland for tax purposes (yes, Boots is now Swiss), and it too avoids UK corporation taxes on billions in trade over here (again, absolutely nothing to do with whether or not its products are rated for VAT – which most in fact are). Greggs as far as I am aware is not a corporate tax avoider.

    #58 2 years ago
  59. revolting

    Granted Boots was a bad example, as they stopped being just a pharmacy ages ago and now sell pretty much anything. It’s practically Argos in there these days. Lloyds, then? A pharmacy, was my point.

    #59 2 years ago
  60. Cort

    “They’re two entirely different business models with different pros and different cons, not charities that people should give to out of the goodness of their hearts. ”

    Who said they deserve charity? Why didn’t you see fit to call for a level regulatory and taxation playing field?

    And you don’t seem bothered by the hypocrisy of people baying for bankers blood while supporting a massive tax avoider when it suits them personally (and in doing so contribute to our current economic and employment malaise).

    Various estimates put Amazon UK’s tax avoidance since 2007 at over £3 billion.

    #60 2 years ago
  61. Cort

    @59 Lloyds still doesn’t work. Amazon avoids tax because it funnels every penny of its UK profits through a tax haven. VAT is charged to the purchaser, not the seller. So saying a pharmacy selling VAT free products is the same thing as Amazon exporting its millions in brown paper bags makes about as much sense as saying it’s getting late because it’s red.

    #61 2 years ago
  62. revolting

    @60 Don’t assume so much; I’m plenty bothered by it. I just don’t think it’s going to change. Everyone is in it for themselves, and just wants the best deal, and doesn’t give a damn about the long term consequences, and that attitude is (in my opinion) largely why we’re in the mess we’re in now in this country. The average consumer simply does not care about the bigger picture, and it’s appalling, but it’s just the nature of the beast; people are selfish and only want to benefit themselves as conveniently as possible, which should not be news to anyone. I thought I made that clear in the second paragraph of 57; if not, apologies, because it certainly does bother me, but equally, I’m under no delusion that pointing out that people are hypocrites is going to solve the situation. People will always shop where it is most convenient for them, be it because it’s online, it’s cheaper, or whatever their reasons are. They really do not care about which vendor is less scrupulous and which benefits our economy; unfortunately, that’s just the way people are, like it or not.

    If it makes me a hypocrite for wanting to play Mass Effect 3 and turning to Amazon where GAME have failed me, so be it. I tried to buy it from the brick and mortar, and look where that got me.

    “Why didn’t you see fit to call for a level regulatory and taxation playing field?”

    Because this is a games news site and right now my biggest concern relating to this site is playing games, not saving our economy. I worry about putting my money in the right places elsewhere; all I care about here is playing Mass Effect 3. While I respect your determination in exposing Amazon as the evil opportunists that they apparently are, this is not the venue for revolutionizing consumer habits, dispensing corporate justice, or shaking the very foundations of taxation inequality. Your crusade may well be a noble cause, but a site where gamers are typically more concerned with which game has the best lens flares or how wobbly Bobby Kotick’s jowls are these days isn’t where you’re going to win your war on Amazon. But thanks for the lecture, all the same, and best of luck in sorting the world out.

    #62 2 years ago

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