Harmonix considering developing non-music motion control games in future

By Debabrata Nath, Tuesday, 20 September 2011 03:49 GMT

Harmonix isn’t shy of stepping outside of its comfort zone to develop a game which isn’t music-centric in future.

This was hinted during an interview with Joystiq by Harmonix CEO Alex Rigopulos: “I think we’re always open-minded about new opportunities.”

Although he confessed that the company’s focus probably will always revolve around music themed games, “Our focus always has been and probably always will be on music-themed games,”  but he added that the latest motion sensing device Kinect has managed to strike a chord with the developer and it’s possible that they might try making something non-music focused for the motion sensor in future.

“A perfect example is the Kinect, which I think that through our work on Dance Central we’ve developed an affinity for — towards motion gaming,” he said.

“It wouldn’t be surprising if in the future we took some steps outside of our wheelhouse in music to try some new things in non-music focused motion gaming.”

Harmonix started off by making a game for EyeToy known as EyeToy: Antigrav before going on to develop Rock Band which established it as a music games developer.

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