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Origin: “We hope to be HBO meets Netflix for gaming,” says Riccitiello

Wednesday, 27th July 2011 16:58 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

During a financial call to investors last night, EA CEO John Riccitiello mentioned the publishers plans for Origin, and stressed it is keeping an eye on the recently launched platform’s profit margin when compared to rival services.

Riccitiello also said since launch, EA has seen “similar revenues” for its games on Origin compared to its offerings on Steam.

“We’re seeing good uptake,” said Riccitiello. “By way of comparision, when we’ve had good success on Steam and then the same title on Origin, we see similar revenues to a service that is much more mature and of higher scale at this point in time.

“So we’re seeing good revenue flow through on Origin. And of course that’s a good thing, since we capture virtually 100 percent margins there. I think the most important issue to us is watching how this thing scales. Obviously margins are going to be very, very important, but it’s going to be how many we have, how frequently they use it, and how much they spend when they use it.”

When asked by an investor on the call whether EA would consider offering third-party games on Origin, Riccitiello seemed confident in the possibility.

“We’ve had a lot of inbound inquiry about getting on,” he said. “I think forward-looking publishers really want their content on any and every platform possible. One more sale is better than not.

“By way of example, even though we have Origin, we are pushing EA content digitally on any and every e-tailer platform we can, and in fact just this morning we were talking to the guys at GameStop, I was personally talking to them about just that. They’re great partners for us… we love what we’re getting with Origin.

“We hope to be HBO meets Netflix for gaming. But we’re also very keen to have our content distributed to anywhere and everywhere gamers are.”

Thanks, Gamasutra.

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39 Comments

  1. DSB

    This won’t end well.

    #1 3 years ago
  2. Phoenixblight

    @1

    Seriously its nothing different than the EADM and when it was named that no one had issue. Once they rebrand people feel they are threatened as if the big bad EA is coming after their precious steam. They just changed the brand to be more appealing there is absolutely nothing wrong with that.

    #2 3 years ago
  3. DSB

    EADM didn’t include an assault on the independent retail market, nor did it throw down the gauntlet for every other publisher to do the same. No publisher can look at Origin and leave it without challenge. The shareholders would never allow it.

    EA are obviously coming at Steam with everything they got, and currently the other digitial distributors are playing a game of “My enemy’s enemy is my friend” with Origin, finally seeing a chance to challenge Steams marketshare, but that’s really only a question of EA conquering enough of the market to go exclusive.

    Why settle for 70-50% when you can have 100%? For a corporation, that’s a no-brainer.

    #3 3 years ago
  4. Sorvin

    So Gamestop is fine with games being bundled with Origin but if they require Steam then they won’t sell them? The makes no sense.
    Gamestop said they wouldn’t sell Steamworks games since it’s like helping out a competitor, I don’t see how Origin is different in this?

    #4 3 years ago
  5. someguy2

    After using Origin for the BF3 alpha I’ve come to the conclusion that it isn’t a bad service. I like it.

    #5 3 years ago
  6. Phoenixblight

    “EADM didn’t include an assault on the independent retail market, nor did it throw down the gauntlet for every other publisher to do the same. ”

    Valve is doing it, they don’t like how the DLC doesn’t go through them to get a cut of it. Thats why they removed DA2, the day Legacy was released. Sorry but this is the internet its not like real world where you go to a store to see where its more convenient. There is no reason why EA can’t have their DLC go through them but Valve doesn’t like that so they start removing EA’s games. And EA or any other publisher should have their own store it removes the cut that Steam takes, they are a retailer for the internet and the internet is just a click a way.

    “So Gamestop is fine with games being bundled with Origin but if they require Steam then they won’t sell them? The makes no sense.
    Gamestop said they wouldn’t sell Steamworks games since it’s like helping out a competitor, I don’t see how Origin is different in this?”

    Because Origin is a DRM and store through EA, who sells their own stuff its not a direct competitor where Steam is just purely a retailer.

    #6 3 years ago
  7. runbmp

    It personally wasn’t for me, its kind of like having a facebook and Google+ account.

    I only really need one, and if that means not playing certain game offerings from EA, then so be it.

    #7 3 years ago
  8. Peetry

    @5 I agree, I think maybe I even prefer it to Steam

    #8 3 years ago
  9. DSB

    @6 And the exact opposite also applies. There’s no reason why EA wouldn’t be able to sell their DLC through the Steam storefront, except of course for greed. Why would Steam accept being a used as a delivery device for other companies to cut them out of the post-sale profits? Of course they want their cut.

    With the ammount of DLC being released, DLC can ammount to as much as a second copy sold.

    “Because Origin is a DRM and store through EA, who sells their own stuff its not a direct competitor where Steam is just purely a retailer.”

    That doesn’t strike you as slightly silly? Origin is a direct competitor to every other delivery service. They do the exact same thing, and they occupy the exact same space, with the only difference being that they’re currently only competing on a limited catalogue, while the client is run by a publisher who also wholesales to other parties.

    It’s highly likely that proprietary clients will emerge to be the biggest threat that the independent online retailers have encountered so far. They’re just playing along for the time being, because it gives them a shot at Steams marketshare.

    #9 3 years ago
  10. Phoenixblight

    “It’s highly likely that proprietary clients will emerge to be the biggest threat that the independent online retailers have encountered so far. They’re just playing along because it gives them a shot at Steams marketshare.”

    And Thats why you are fanboy, It shouldn’t matter. They are a retailer should I only go to Walmart because they offer items for a cheaper price? No I shouldn’t. I am a consumer so I buy where it is cheaper and offers the most for my buck. If EA, Steam, Gamestop whomever want to fight over their consumers, let them. Steam has been top dog and retailers want the same thing. BTW Steam runs no matter what whether you have it on offline mode or online mode and it still takes 20% of your memory no matter what. I can just click play on Origin for a game and turn it off and continue playing without a client still running.

    “That doesn’t strike you as slightly silly? Origin is a direct competitor to every other delivery service.”

    No because they only sell their own items and they still allow everyone to sell their items. Valve is the one removing their games from their listing.

    #10 3 years ago
  11. DSB

    @10 You’re pretty conveniently avoiding the actual argument, and resorting to petty namecalling. Impressive, man.

    I do prefer Steam for a number of reasons, but that has nothing to do with the obvious precedent that’s set when a publishers proprietary client starts rendering them 100% of the sales, in direct competition with independent retailers. I think you just wish that pathetic fanboy accusation was true.

    I don’t recall saying that competition is bad. But a manufacturer engaging with an independent market, in selling its own merchandise is not in any way good for competition, since they have the ultimate advantage in also supplying the competition, at their own convenience.

    It sounds a bit more fanboyish to me to be popping out to defend every move any EA-related business makes, and disregarding any form of criticism against it. The fact that you’ll even deny Origin as being a digital distributor, competing for the very same sales as everybody else on their games, says it all.

    The sole purpose of the client is to win sales from independent retailers, and render a 100% margin on every sale.

    My Steam is currently peaking at 150 megabytes of memory out of 8 gigabytes available, so I don’t know what you’re doing wrong, but it sounds serious.

    #11 3 years ago
  12. Peetry

    @11 Interesting, Steam for me peaks at 195 and works typically at 150. Also @Phoenixblight are you sure you can close Origin while in-game, BF3 Alpha won’t let me? Or have I misunderstood?

    #12 3 years ago
  13. Phoenixblight

    “It sounds a bit more fanboyish to me to be popping out to defend every move any EA-related business makes, and disregarding any form of criticism against it. The fact that you’ll even deny Origin as being a digital distributor, competing for the very same sales as everybody else on their games, says it all.”

    Even if Activision was doing the exact same thing, I would be doing the same thing as I am now. I have never denied them has being a distributator I simply said there is no reason not to they are the one publishing the game and should be able to sell it directly through them just like Disney does.

    “The sole purpose of the client is to win sales from independent retailers, and render a 100% margin on every sale.”

    Business 101 get the most of out of your product. No one wants to give up 30% when they can just sell it directly.

    “My Steam is currently peaking at 150 megabytes of memory out of 8 gigabytes available, so I don’t know what you’re doing wrong, but it sounds serious.”

    Thats when its being ran in the background when its being actually used with games, it has a huge memory leak issue.

    @12
    Yes It does. I have done with it Alice, DA2, Dead Space 2, and ME 2. Its probably something with it being battlefield alpha and it needing to be going directly through them.

    #13 3 years ago
  14. freedoms_stain

    Steam is way smoother. When Steam Updates it just does it, maybe you have to click “restart steam” if the update arrives while you have the program running, but that’s it, when Origin has an update it’s like doing a fresh install all over again, I have to babysit it and click through. Also I discovered after downloading the BF3 alpha that after the last update it reset my download and install location settings so I now have BF3 installed somewhere I don’t want it.

    Also, Steam is sitting at 19.5MB in my memory right now, Origin? 72MB

    #14 3 years ago
  15. DSB

    @13 Let’s review: “Because Origin is a DRM and store through EA, who sells their own stuff its not a direct competitor where Steam is just purely a retailer.”

    Pure fantasy. They are a direct competitor. They sell EA games in the same space as everybody else selling EA games online, as such being, very definitely, a direct competitor.

    The reason why Impulse and others are jumping on the wagon is because they see an opportunity to gain a small advantage over Steam, who owns most of the market. They can get customers from Steam over to their clients looking for EA games, and at the same time, gain an opportunity to sell them the rest of their catalogue, for which EA is not a threat, and probably won’t be. They have nothing to lose, and everything to gain, as opposed to Steam, who have everything to lose.

    Again, it’s a simple case of “My enemy’s enemy is my friend” – It’s not that Origin isn’t a threat, it’s just that it isn’t the biggest one for the time being.

    So I’ve just been running Dragon Age: Origins on Steam, and it actually dropped to 110 megabytes. Myth busted.

    #15 3 years ago
  16. runbmp

    I find it kind of funny, that they still distribute games on the Apple appstore and haven’t opened their own distribution system on Android.

    Been burned by EA’s shoddy products and business ethics one too many times. Certainly not about to commit investing my gaming library with them.

    #16 3 years ago
  17. Phoenixblight

    “So I’ve just been running Dragon Age: Origins on Steam, and it actually dropped to 110 megabytes. Myth busted.”

    Just because it does that for you doesn’t not make it the same for everyone. I know what I have seen and I know how to check this stuff. THis will just become a my word against yours so just leave it where it is.

    “The reason why Impulse and others are jumping on the wagon is because they see an opportunity to gain a small advantage over Steam, who owns most of the market. They can get customers from Steam over to their clients looking for EA games, and at the same time, gain an opportunity to sell them the rest of their catalogue, for which EA is not a threat, and probably won’t be. They have nothing to lose, and everything to gain, as opposed to Steam, who have everything to lose.”

    And this is an issue because? Its not for me I still get my games one way or another it has no effect on the consumer. Maybe it will make Valve actually become game developer instead of being the walmart of the internet.

    #17 3 years ago
  18. DSB

    @17 Let’s be clear, the client isn’t EAs gift to the world, it’s EAs gift to EA. They’re making 30% more than they would on Steam on every copy sold, and 30% of that is going into their own pockets. They aren’t using that opportunity to give us a deal, and why should they? Nobody’s able to compete with them for it.

    That’s not great for consumers in and of itself, but Origin won’t change much on its own. It’s only when every other publisher starts to do the same, that we’re in trouble.

    Looking at what that mentality has done for consoles, it’s obvious that producer/retailers competing with eachother won’t spare any expense in pushing their goods, to the disadvantage of the consumer, both in terms of what’s available, but certainly also in the sense that you’ll need 5 different clients to play games from 5 different publishers – As opposed to one, as until recently.

    It would be entirely different if it was just an independent client. Competition is good, but only so long as it’s on equal terms.

    #18 3 years ago
  19. kumaCannon

    I have no animosity towards Origin and EA. It’s their right as a corporation to compete how they see fit as long as it is legal. I think gamers have blown this out of proportion, because they believe they need a product from a certain company.

    Let me be clear I will never use Origin, or Gamestops impulse. Before Valve’s product steam became a big player in the PC Market, PC games were ignored in their brick and mortar stores. I don’t remember having a plethora of EA games before steam, matter of fact I don’t have many now. But I have also had a taste of EAs Security practices and I just don’t favor them. And I certainly wouldn’t trust them with my information. That is a personal choice based on pass experiences with the company.

    Here is where I get confused in this debate. I compare it to the debate against Walmart. I have plenty of friends that have heard of Walmart moving into communities and putting the mom and pop shops out of business. My friends will complain how evil Walmart is; then proceed to patronage their business as if nothing happened. Same goes with EA, I remember the backlash of DA II. I remember what seems eons ago now, When gamers raged against them for buying up company after company. And now its seems to all float away because they have BF3 and ME3.

    Now this doesn’t go for everybody, if you are cool with EA’s practices then you have nothing really to worry about. But if you don’t like the way EA does business; why cry and moan about Origin just don’t use it. This is the MW boycott all over again; gamers complain about something as if it is an addiction and they NEED their fix. Just say NO!

    #19 3 years ago
  20. DSB

    Nobody’s disputing their right to do it, though.

    I’m not going to use Origin just because EA pulls their games from my preferred client, but that’s hardly how most of the people who want to play BF3 or SWTOR see it.

    Everybody knows that the vast majority of consumers are disloyal and disingenuous, just look at the ammount of people who decry Call of Duty online, and compare that to the consistency of the sales each year.

    That’s my problem, though, and you can call that whining if you’d like, but personally I don’t think the market that EA is opening up for is one that’s going to benefit us in any way. It’s going to let publishers maximize their margins, completely legally and legimately, but it’s going to be at our expense, offering less competition, and higher inconvenience.

    I’m not calling for anyone to rise up against it, there’s nothing to do about it. I just think it’s a shame.

    #20 3 years ago
  21. kumaCannon

    @20
    I am not saying you are wrong, I won’t be using Origin either for many of those same reasons. But we have to be realistic, if gamers are this easily manipulated by a companies product, then we can’t Blame EA for what happens to the industry. Simply put if gamers prioritize a companies monetary well being over their own, they deserve to be ripped off.

    I am not saying that you defending your points is whining. I can give a specific point, I have a friend that can not stand Bobby Kotick. Yet picks up ever activision game when ever they drop. He picked up Guitar hero, he picked up MW2, WOW Cataclsym. Yet He will then ask “How can Bobby Kotick get away with insulting gamers”. Simply put if a product governs how you feel about a company at any given moment, and not their business practices then how can we blame the companies if they continue to do the same bad practices.

    That is why I feel it is blown out of proportion many, gamers say they don’t like how game a company works. Yet in the long run one game can make them forget any past gripes.

    #21 3 years ago
  22. DSB

    That’s certainly true. It’s down to the consumers. Just like elections are down to the voters. Sadly neither seem very qualified in making those decisions, even if they do end up with the companies and the governments they deserve.

    That being said, I do think it is going to new extremes. People would react a lot stronger if EA had started putting down brick and mortar stores, to push other stores out. I strongly doubt any of them realize the significance of it.

    There is a question of ethics involved, though. EA is driven by the demands of the shareholders that they keep making more and more money, but that money has to come from somewhere. In this case, instead of making more, better products that trigger increased sales, they resort to gobbling the margins with a client.

    I think that’s the latest in a long line of pretty unimpressive business practices, not just by EA, but by the industry as a whole. They’re vindicated by the consumers, but that doesn’t mean they’re better or more admirable.

    #22 3 years ago
  23. Phoenixblight

    Yes the slippery slope argument those are so fun to speculate and come up with the worst possible solution. You know how FOX does the exact same thing.

    Blizzard has been doing the same thing and since EA is coming out with their own MMO why shouldn’t they do what works for Blizzard? Valve does the same thing you can only get their game directly through them no where else so why is this an issue? Because of the possibility of every publisher doing it? SO what? There is no reason to having all the clients running at the same time. IF you have a close knit group of friendd that you play with pick up an instant messenger so you can all play whatever game. Valve is a lot more intrusive, they monitor every action you do with the client active, when you browse the net, what is installed on your computer not just what games, what your computer has installed. All while they are selling all this information to other developers and yet people are fine with this. But they have issue when Facebook does it? Think people are delusional about Valve’s intentions.

    #23 3 years ago
  24. DSB

    @23 Running from the argument again, I see.

    Could you get any more desperate? Seriously? You do realize that all that monitoring is completely volountary, right? You don’t even even have to keep the security measures in place. Talk about conspiracy theories. I bet they’re doing it for the templars, dude.

    Neither Blizzard nor Valve are major publishers (depending on how you see Blizzard) trying to leverage a giant catalogue against independent retailers. It’s an entirely different league, playing an entirely different game.

    Impulse is a (publisher-) independent client selling Stardocks games exclusively as well, it’s hardly something that even makes a dent in the market.

    Essentially neither Valve nor Blizzard have the ability to change the market even if they tried. Keeping a few games a year, if that, away from major distributors is not going to affect the business as a whole.

    Valves intentions are their own. EAs intentions are the same as any other major corporation – Growth and profits at any cost.

    #24 3 years ago
  25. Phoenixblight

    “Could you get any more desperate? Seriously? You do realize that all that monitoring is completely volountary, right? You don’t even even have to keep the security measures in place. Talk about conspiracy theories. I bet they’re doing it for the templars, dude.”

    RIght its all in my head.

    http://www.valvesoftware.com/privacy.html

    “By using Valve’s online sites and products, users agree that Valve may collect aggregate information, individual information, and personally identifiable information, as defined below. Valve may share aggregate information and individual information with other parties. Valve shall not share personally identifiable information with other parties, except as described in the policy below.

    “Aggregate information” is information that describes the habits, usage patterns, and demographics of users as a group but does not describe or reveal the identity of any particular user.”
    Yep definitely all in my head.

    #25 3 years ago
  26. DSB

    It’s all in your head that it’s somehow a bad thing. Who cares? Most of the things we use do all of that and more, from Facebook to Google. Anything that a corporation might want to know about you, they already have. I’m sure even VG247 is keeping tabs on us for internal purposes, and Origin will as well.

    Somehow I don’t see my door being broken down by guys wearing skimasks trying to kill me as a result.

    Throw out your computer and go live in a forest if that sort of thing bothers you man :P

    The hardware and software surveys are entirely random and volountary on a monthly basis, to ensure a random sample of users. If everybody opts-in just to show their badass rigs, and everybody else hides because they have shitty rigs, then the survey is useless.

    I’m pretty sure the people who use Steam to sell their games appreciate the wealth of information they’re able to provide. Not bad for a service that lets you keep 70% of the share.

    #26 3 years ago
  27. TheWulf

    Wow. Some people are lapping up the EA releases. I wonder if that makes them lapdogs?

    The thing is is that Valve still hasn’t told us their side of the story, so until that happens we can’t make any assumptions EITHER WAY. And it’s kind of foolish to even try to. But there you go… it’ll happen anyway and that’s the Internet for you.

    #27 3 years ago
  28. Phoenixblight

    “Somehow I don’t see my door being broken down by guys wearing skimasks trying to kill me as a result.”

    Did I say that? No I did not. Just saying they are doing more than beyond what Facebook does.
    Facebook doesn’t install software on my computer and track where I go on the internet or what installed on my PC.

    “The hardware and software surveys are entirely random and volountary on a monthly basis, to ensure a random sample of users. If everybody opts-in just to show their badass rigs, and everybody else hides because they have shitty rigs, then the survey is useless.”

    What surveys? They don’t need to in fact there is button at the top of steam that tells you everything about your computer and its entirety they can extrapolate that info quite easily says so right in the Policy.

    Google only keeps track of what you are searching and your IP. All I was doing was pointing out that Valve is not a clean, white as a lamb retailer and they have their own agenda as well to make money from their service while selling the info they have pulled to other clients and I am not saying our personal information but the metrics; of what people are playing, how they are playing, and what they are playing with. Thats all I was trying to show. In fact once upon a time you could go to their site and pick a game and see where people were dying the most in any game through Valve service. But they have pulled down that “feature”

    I know by using the internet I am being tracked one way or another, I don’t care about that.

    #28 3 years ago
  29. DSB

    @28 Wow….

    I think you’re getting a little too crazy at this point to warrant a response.

    Valve provides information to their vendors, as has been noted in many an article, and they put that in their EULA. Until you have some kind of proof that they’re part of a sinister conspiracy, that’s hardly damaging evidence.

    The idea that Valve are using that paragraph to spy on its users personal lives, rather than simply collecting statistics on the games they’re selling for the publishers, is entirely your own desperate fantasy.

    And you talk about Fox News… Yikes!

    #29 3 years ago
  30. Phoenixblight

    Whatever you are obviously just ignoring the policy to fill in whatever cloud nine dream you have of Valve and their agenda.

    #30 3 years ago
  31. DSB

    You’re right Glenn Beck, I’m totally oblivious to the corporate menace that is attempting to take over my life by virtue of their evil online store.

    I’m just a naive commie like that, I guess. I’m sure we won’t truly know until it’s too late.

    Christ. Just a shred of self-realization here man, you’ve been doing little more than calling the kettle black all day. Get a grip.

    “THE VALVE AGENDA!” – Quote of the day.

    #31 3 years ago
  32. Phoenixblight

    You have been beating the Valve drum like its best thing since sliced bread when they are not they have flaws just like EA and other distributors and you get offended that EA want to be their own online distributor so what? Is it piss your lemondade does it stop you from playing games? Not unless you want to just stick to Valve because they have been good to you.
    All I was trying to point out that every retailer is out there to get paid and with Valve removing DA2 on the DAY OF release of its DLC just shows they don’t like that a publisher is not bending to their way of doing things. I am honestly glad that Gamestop and their impulse and other retailers are starting to threaten Steam with their stranglehold on the PC market because then Valve will have to find something else to do like you know actually make games which they started from.

    ANd since Gamestop has come out said they will not sell any game that uses Steam that removes games like Fallout NV being sold by Gamestop the number 1 retailer for games.

    #32 3 years ago
  33. DSB

    Actually that’s mostly down to your own delusion. Of course Steam isn’t perfect, and of course everybody has the right to challenge them. I have nothing against Impulse, D2D, GamersGate or any other independent retail service, and I wouldn’t even say I’m completely against Origin.

    It’s not the service or the idea. Like I say above, many other producers have had proprietary retail, but without aggressively pursueing independent markets. They’ve had a sensible form of restraint. EA obviously doesn’t, which is what I take offence from.

    I think it sets a sad precedent, and I don’t think it’s going to serve to our benefit as consumers, and certainly even less as users of Steam and Impulse.

    Even if it is a private company, Steam is there to make money as much as anyone else. They have made shady deals with Activision over Call of Duty and effectively taken the other independent retailers out of the game on a row of very important titles by doing so. They’re not innocent victims of anything, they’re a business like any other.

    That doesn’t change the fact that they’re an independent retailer, that as such is forced to compete on the same terms as any other, and which obviously not just by my own account, has done quite a lot of things right in the last 8 years. They didn’t conquer 50-70% of the market by being the worst service out there.

    I wouldn’t mind if they were marginalized on a level playing field by another independent retailer, but EA is nothing of the sort.

    #33 3 years ago
  34. Phoenixblight

    SO publishers should just stay in their corner and not sell their things directly? ….. thats delusional. No business is going to say no to 100% gain.

    #34 3 years ago
  35. DSB

    Okay, I’ll say it a third time: There are plenty of producers who also do proprietary retail – With the main difference being that they generally don’t try to aggressively challenge the independent retail market.

    Do they have to show restraint? No. Does it give them ethical superiority? Yes.

    Publishers have stayed in that “corner” for the better part of 30 years without incident. It’s only now when the stockmarket has become utterly hysteric in the way it rates businesses, and CEOs as a result are becoming predatory in terms of trying to keep up unrealistic expectations, that we’re seeing these kinds of measures.

    And Origin isn’t the only example of it. There’s DLC, there’s online passes, and unexplained price hikes. All are ways of making money with little to no effort – Making money out of nothing.

    #35 3 years ago
  36. Phoenixblight

    “Publishers have stayed in that “corner” for the better part of 30 years without incident. It’s only now when the stockmarket has become utterly hysteric in the way it rates businesses, and CEOs as a result are becoming predatory in terms of trying to keep up unrealistic expectations, that we’re seeing these kinds of measures.”

    Well the Internet is like the wild west and its every man for himself and they are a business. DOlla DOlla bills yall.

    “And Origin isn’t the only example of it. There’s DLC, there’s online passes, and unexplained price hikes. All are ways of making money with little to no effort – Making money out of nothing.”

    THats not something to be dinging at EA. DLC were going to come eventually expansions took too long and were too expensive to make where DLC they can get out quickly and then charge for it. Online passes were going come out eventually and has no effect on consumers anyways except second hand buyers which no publisher is gonna give a shit about they never saw money from them in the first place and all publishers are picking up this tactic so maybe you should stop playing video games. Not sure what you are talking about as far as unexplained price hikes there have been none of those in the States. IF you are talking about the EU well then I can’t comment on that. Video games and the EU have always had issues with pricing.

    #36 3 years ago
  37. DSB

    I wasn’t putting that on EA in any way. I was simply pointing it out as a general trend, in connection to the increasing demands of a stock market that whips itself into a psychotic frenzy, without caring about the consequences.

    I don’t disagree that publishers don’t give a shit, and I realize that DLC is better for business. That doesn’t make it less of a line in the sand, nor one that hasn’t been crossed until now.

    EA packaged Dragon Age: Origins with day-1 DLC for 60 euro (and dollars) essentially meaning that if you didn’t pay, you didn’t get the full game. And then of course there’s Activision with their epic monetization of Call of Duty, which suddenly became a 60 euro (and dollar) game as well, with a handful of maps costing 15.

    Others like Codemasters have gone in the opposite direction and started charging 35, but I don’t know if that’s going to catch on.

    If I was so moved by corporations and their conduct, then I wouldn’t be a consumer. I can live with chinese children making my clothes and I can live with EA going after the independent retail market.

    I simply reserve the right to think that it’s a shame when corporations take it upon themselves to fuck up a good thing. You’re certainly free to eat a shit sandwich and like it too, if you want.

    #37 3 years ago
  38. Phoenixblight

    “I simply reserve the right to think that it’s a shame when corporations take it upon themselves to fuck up a good thing.”

    Thats certainly your right. I have no issue with this because its business and if I don’t like a certain corps tactics I don’t buy their products like Capcoms recent trend.

    “EA packaged Dragon Age: Origins with day-1 DLC for 60 euro”

    That is an exception not a rule. DAO was supposed to be an PC game but since they were bought by EA. EA delayed the PC release until the console games were done which gave Bioware enough time to fix cut content (Shale) and to make DLC for the game. EA learned a new tactic if you buy the game new you get a free DLC for it and then further into if you preorder a game you get another set of free DLC. I personally have no issues with this because I typically preorder my games anyways and EA usually puts out the free DLC for everyone.

    #38 3 years ago
  39. swiftwella

    Phoenixblight, Valve has games of their own, so shut it about Steam being only a ‘walmart’ for the internet. Read about Steam’s history and how it is being developed over the years. Gabe Newell is a genious and it was a fresh air to the gaming industry what Valve has done. Half-Life, Left 4 Dead, Portal, Counter-Strike, Day of Defeat, Team Fortress… Step off your high horse.

    #39 3 years ago

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