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Sega “reasonably encouraged” by Vanquish sales

Tuesday, 26th October 2010 06:44 GMT By Johnny Cullen

vanquish

Sega West boss Mike Hayes has told IGN the publisher is “reasonably encouraged” by sales of OTT Platinum shooter Vanquish.

Exact official figures haven’t been revealed yet, but according to a report from Sega Bits, first day Japanese sales of the game were at 56k, with a majority of sales towards the PS3 SKU.

Despite that, Hayes remains optimistic.

“It’s been in the marketplace for two days, we’ve seen the day one numbers and we’re reasonably encouraged, but I think we need to see the rest of week one and probably week two just to see how it’s going to play out,” he told IGN.

“The challenge is that it’s a new franchise and that it’s releasing head-to-head with a lot of established franchises in the busiest time of the year.”

Vanquish released last week in the US last Tuesday and in Europe and UK on Friday to critical success.

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46 Comments

  1. Blerk

    Well, I hope it works out for them. It seems more likely that it won’t, but at least they tried, no?

    #1 4 years ago
  2. AHA-Lambda

    please buy it everyone ;_;

    you there! Yes YOU! You who complains about the lack of creativity and innovation in games! You want that?

    BUY THIS GAME!!

    If you don’t then you have no right to ever complan why CoD 9 gets to sell 20 million units again!

    #2 4 years ago
  3. YoungZer0

    If it fails then it’s because of SEGA’s lack for advertising it properly.

    Frankly i have no problem if this game fails. I want games with a smart story, and a refreshing art-direction.

    #3 4 years ago
  4. Robo_1

    If Zavvi ever decide to ship my copy, then I look forward to contributing to those sales figures.

    Let’s face it though, with most games being front loaded sales wise, those figures can’t make for very pretty reading over at Sega HQ. What’s sad is that it seems they’ve created something quite special, and it must be extremely frustrating for them to be generally ignored by the gaming masses, who then flock to not dissimilar experiences like Gears Of War in their millions.

    Whatever Platinum do next, they need to factor a good dose of marketing and multiplayer into the equation.

    Although that said, Vanquish has been respectably promoted across the net, but Sega just lack the funds to generate much of a ripple across the wider action crowd.

    #4 4 years ago
  5. pukem0n

    if this game had local split screen mode i’d actually prefer it to Gears of War *ducksandruns*
    yeah, it’s that awesome!!!

    #5 4 years ago
  6. Michael O’Connor

    Game’s a masterpiece. If you don’t buy this, you have no right to criticise the industry for a lack of innovation ever again.

    Bayonetta sold just fine. All this proves is that you don’t need to sell a game during the holiday seasons. The abysmal sales of the titles released over the last few weeks seem to indicate that, in fact, it will have an extremely negative impact on the sales of you game, especially if it’s a new franchise.

    People are too busy either playing or waiting for the megatons – Halo, Call of Duty, etc.

    #6 4 years ago
  7. Callum

    is it REALLY that good?

    The demo I played at expo was…boring. There was nothing new, it was gears but instead of brown they painted everything white? Sure, jumping in the giant mech thing was interesting…but it certainly wasn’t new?

    What EXACTLY does it do so differently that I should go out right now and buy a copy?

    #7 4 years ago
  8. Callum

    The answer: I don’t know, because I’ve not seen a single fucking advert for it. Nice play Sega.

    #8 4 years ago
  9. Michael O’Connor

    @7 You’re playing it wrong: http://www.thegamingvault.com/2010/10/protip-vanquish-is-not-a-cover-shooter/

    #9 4 years ago
  10. Blerk

    Is it really that innovative, Michael? It is just a third-person shooter after all.

    I’m not saying that that’s bad, but ‘innovative’ wouldn’t be one of the words I’d have automatically thought of when seeing Vanquish.

    #10 4 years ago
  11. Michael O’Connor

    @10 The game is an exercise in gameplay purity. Every weapon has it purpose, every skill and ability is refined to within an inch of its life. It makes every single third person shooter that had ever been created up to this point look amateurish and poorly developed.

    Vanquish does for third person shooters what Bayonetta did for spectacle fighters. It didn’t just raise the bar… it put the bar on such a high level that almost nobody else can reach it. I can safely say that anyone who doesn’t get why Vanquish is so innovative has no real understanding of the depth of GAMEplay. That or they don’t care.

    If you’re looking for an experience to immerse yourself, Vanquish is not the game for you. If you’re looking for some of the most perfected gameplay ever seen in gaming though, then Vanquish is a dream come true.

    Vanquish is not a cover shooter. Calling Vanquish a cover shooter is like saying a rainbow has two colours.

    #11 4 years ago
  12. Blerk

    Hmm. The one thing I can absolutely say about both Vanquish and Bayonetta is that I absolutely don’t ‘get’ them, I find neither particularly appealing. Judging by the sales of both I think it’s safe to assume that I’m not alone on that.

    From the demos of both I think it’s fair to say that in both cases they haven’t done a very good job of introducing the player to the mechanics and that’s possibly why they’ve been such a hard sell despite the review scores.

    Bayonetta I saw that enormous combos list and pretty much switched off straight away. Vanquish I played and quite liked initially but then got super-punished because I was ‘playing it wrong’. When the game doesn’t really explain how to ‘play it right’, that’s a problem – you shouldn’t have to go and look up YouTube videos to figure out how it’s supposed to work. If you’re breaking existing conventions then surely it’s in the game’s best interest to introduce them to you properly?

    Of course, the full game might do that – I don’t know because I didn’t buy it. But if the demo had done that then perhaps it would’ve stood a better chance with me? And possibly a lot of other people?

    #12 4 years ago
  13. Michael O’Connor

    @12 The only one missing out is you. These games have Easy Automatic modes for people too lazy or too unwilling to learn.

    Bayonetta sold just fine, so I’m not sure what your point there is.

    #13 4 years ago
  14. StolenGlory

    @13

    Agreed on your points but also I’m not sure on this but didn’t Bayonetta do a million?

    @VG247 Web Admin

    For fuck sake when are you going to sort out the comment posting issue prompt that says ‘You’re posting too quickly’ when you’re not.

    We’ve been waiting fucking months for what appears to be an easy fix.

    #14 4 years ago
  15. RETARDED VIKING

    Manage to get this game loan to me and well, the gamplay had a good idea rolling but it got repetitive fast.i’d like to see a sequel and adress the issues, like the camera sometimes it just goes crazy when im dodging/rolling.

    #15 4 years ago
  16. SplatteredHouse

    “You’re playing it wrong” What a precious defense/criticism! :D
    If the game wants to be played a certain way, then it, I agree with Blerk on this, does need to show how it should be played, either through its mechanics (is “you’re dead’, really a valid method of feedback – discuss) or tutorial of some kind.

    #16 4 years ago
  17. Blerk

    Well, Bayonetta sold fine once it hit the discount bins. It might’ve done reasonable numbers but I’d be surprised if they made the money out of it that they’d have hoped for considering the review scores.

    For Bayonetta I’m perfectly willing to accept that the problem is mine – I don’t like learning dozens of combos, I don’t find that kind of game fun.

    For Vanquish, I’m not so sure it’s me at fault. If it looks like a ham sandwich and tastes like a ham sandwich at first bite then I don’t think it’s wrong to assume that I should eat it like a ham sandwich. If I then subsequently find that the centre of said sandwich is full of rocks and I break my teeth, I don’t much appreciate being told after the event that I’ve been “eating it wrong”. The rocks and the method of eating should’ve been clearly labelled on the packaging.

    I think that analogy might’ve gotten away from me slightly. :-D

    #17 4 years ago
  18. Michael O’Connor

    @16 Both the demo and full game have a tutorial.

    If you’re still playing badly after that, then lower the difficulty.

    @17 You don’t need to learn 80% of Bayonetta’s combos unless you’re super hardcore and trying to top the leaderboards.

    #18 4 years ago
  19. Gadzooks!

    I’d have to agree with Blerk here.

    Although polished and wacky and very very Japanese (all good things btw) I didnt ‘click’ with Vanquish at all, and I’m pretty sure that is down to not explaining the large range of moves in the demo.

    It would have been better to actually prevent the player from playing the game like a regular 3rd person shooter, at least in the first level so that the more spectacular move set is showcased and imprinted on the player.

    Even though I didn’t ‘get’ Vanquish I do hope it sells, as it does seem to be genuinely pushing established boundaries, both technically and design/gameplay wise.

    #19 4 years ago
  20. Blerk

    The trouble with Vanquish’s tutorial is that it teaches you the controls but it doesn’t teach you how to play the game.

    #20 4 years ago
  21. Michael O’Connor

    Then play it and figure it out.

    It’s not rocket science.

    #21 4 years ago
  22. Blerk

    I did. I couldn’t. Interest lost. Game fail.

    #22 4 years ago
  23. Michael O’Connor

    It’s not the designer’s fault if you’re too lazy to learn.

    They’re video games, not video toys. You play with a toy. You learn a game.

    #23 4 years ago
  24. StolenGlory

    “The trouble with Vanquish’s tutorial is that it teaches you the controls but it doesn’t teach you how to play the game.”

    Surely once you know the controls it’s the kind of game where it’s down to skill? I mean once you’ve learned the controls you’re effectively given the tools to finish the game at which point it’s just a case of knowing when to dodge, which weapons to use, when you use cover and so on.

    The game has a simple premise (hyper kinetic cover shooter) but once you’ve learned the controls it’s up to you to master it; which to be fair, is how it should be with a game from this type of genre that presents you with a genuine challenge.

    Equally, I got a far larger sense of accomplishment out of beating Vanquish’s fiendish bosses than I did out of Enslaved for example, simply because the skill requirement was higher and as a result it felt good that I what I had practiced and learnt allowed me to finish the game.

    #24 4 years ago
  25. Robo_1

    I thought the tutorial included with Vanquish was pretty well rounded.

    Like any game which does things a bit different, it takes a bit of time to adjust to how Vanquish plays. I hated my first run through of the demo, but if you stick with it, it’s immensely rewarding.

    That said it’s not for everyone. It’s so hectic that it can really be a strain to play, but for those who enjoy games which put you in “the zone”, there’s few like it.

    #25 4 years ago
  26. Michael O’Connor

    For the record, sales of Bayonetta were around 1.35million wordwide (as stated by Examiner), a few weeks after its release. You can probably add a few hundred thousand onto that figure since.

    #26 4 years ago
  27. Blerk

    @24, I would agree with that if it wasn’t for the fact that Vanquish appears to require such a radically different style of play the practically every other third-person shooter out there. Given that it’s so different it would’ve been nice for them to have a playable tutorial level which takes you through the basics of how you’re supposed to be playing the game.

    As it is it teaches you the controls and then throws you into something that looks like a standard 3ps, so you play it like a standard 3ps and it doesn’t work.

    This isn’t a fault with the gameplay, it’s a fault with the accessibility. You don’t have the information you need to play the game properly up front. That’s not to say that the game’s broken or somehow substandard, it’s that the game is its own worst enemy – it creates a bad first impression with a large chunk of the audience it’s aiming to sell to by failing to point out the basics of the gameplay.

    It’s not laziness on the part of the player, it’s short-sightedness on the part of the designers. They know how to play the game. We don’t. Maybe some people would check out videos on YouTube and go back and try again, and maybe those people would have a good time and be convinced. But I’m willing to bet that most won’t – and that’s precisely why the demo was so lacking.

    First impressions are absolutely everything. There’s so much stuff out there in competition it’s essential that you get those first impressions right. Vanquish doesn’t.

    #27 4 years ago
  28. Telepathic.Geometry

    I finished this game last night after two pretty much solid days of playing it on Hard from the start. The joy in the game is learning how to beat everybody, and learning the layout of the levels.

    For example, first level, I figured out my gameplan was to rush in, slowtime, kick a face, go get the sniper rifle, come back, slowtime shoot, dash, kick face, snipe heavy artillery bastards, run in, save my allies, bomb into the bunker, cover and shoot, hijack mech, gun down the reinforcements…

    …and that’s just the first level. Every level has its perfect gameplay style. This, like Dead Space before it, is a flawless game in my opinion, and I wholeheartedly implore gamers to give it a fair shake. It makes Gears look like a massive turd!

    #28 4 years ago
  29. StolenGlory

    @27

    Given the developer’s heritage a standard 3rd person shooter coming from them would be the last thing I would go into that game expecting.

    I must ask however, what specifically caught you off guard Blerk?

    #29 4 years ago
  30. Michael O’Connor

    “I would agree with that if it wasn’t for the fact that Vanquish appears to require such a radically different style of play the practically every other third-person shooter out there.”

    And yet we all cry when the industry keeps rehashing the same ideas over and over and over and over and over again?

    Hilarious.

    “It’s not laziness on the part of the player, it’s short-sightedness on the part of the designers. They know how to play the game. We don’t.”

    You are seriously over-estimating Vanquish’s learning curve if you think it requires looking at YouTube and other better players to play it well. You don’t.

    It took me two minutes of getting killed behind cover to realise that “Oh, you know… maybe I should boost around a little more and make optimal use of my boost, instead of just randomly shooting shit.”

    “But I’m willing to bet that most won’t – and that’s precisely why the demo was so lacking.”

    That’s why they have Easy Automatic. People seem offended by the fact that normal actually requires some skill. With most games nowadays, normal is the new easy.

    “First impressions are absolutely everything.”

    Only if you’re an incredibly simple person not willing to dig a little deeper and appreciate what’s under the surface. And that’s not an insult against you, because you’re quite the smart fellow and I’m actually incredibly surprised by your quick dismissal of the game.

    #30 4 years ago
  31. Telepathic.Geometry

    @Blerk: I see what you’re saying, but I think that what you’re suggesting is like a hint system in Professor Layton/Zelda to tell you where to go and what to do when you’re stuck.

    Just keep playing and experimenting with your lovely shiny battle suit. I was slowtiming and dashing my way towards a massive robot last-night with the intention of kicking it. If you love exploration in games, that’s how you explore. Can I kick more than one guy at a time, can I kick one guy more than once? What does my melee do with this weapon? Can I slide under his legs, and slow-time, and shoot him in the back? Can I get this robot to shoot this robot by drawing his fire?

    If you wanna know these answers, this game is for you. If not, well, you’re missing out.

    #31 4 years ago
  32. StolenGlory

    Vanquish breaks the 3rd person cover mould in so many ways that yes, it expects the player to evolve alongside the concept.

    Evolution is never sign posted; instead we discover and learn and in essence this is one of the core mechanics behind Bayonetta and Vanquish I feel.

    Telepathic.Geometry’s post of his strategy for beating the first level of the game is an apt example of this.

    #32 4 years ago
  33. DaMan

    @17 Blerk – Bayonetta reached 1.35 million in May, it sold a million in it’s first month: http://ps3.ign.com/articles/106/1066973p1.html

    #33 4 years ago
  34. Psychotech

    I’m 100% with Michael O’ Connor on this .he covered up almost everything i wanted to say about this game.The game is a masterpiece.
    There are different ways to play this game,you can either play it cover and shoot or you can go all out using the ARS unit properly which is how the game is supposed to be played and will give you less hard time.At first you won’t get how the game is supposed to be played but eventualy it will come naturaly as you progress through Acts and you’ll really have a blast.
    Platinum once again made a masterpiece

    #34 4 years ago
  35. StolenGlory

    @34

    Agreed. Ergh, I just looked at my #32 post and realised it didn’t actually say anything and was just in fact loads of gushing instead.

    Ah well :)

    #35 4 years ago
  36. Blerk

    It really wasn’t a ‘quick’ dismissal from me. I must’ve tried to beat that boss at the end of the demo at least 50 times and never managed it, no matter what I tried. At some point that stops being fun, and you give up. Even if I had managed to beat that boss, I probably wouldn’t have bought the game by that point because I’d be presuming that every boss thereafter would frustrate in a similar fashion – the damage had been done.

    The trouble with ‘easy’ modes is that quite often they then make the game too easy. Take, for instance, Devil May Cry. In normal mode I couldn’t play that for toffee. In easy mode I could play it with my eyes shut. As a result, I had fun with neither mode and found the game exceptionally tedious. Playing Bayonetta brought that memory back and that’s precisely why I didn’t buy it. Playing Vanquish made me think of Bayonetta – same result.

    I suppose the answer to all this is actually really simple – neither of these games are ‘for me’. And that’s fine – there’s plenty of other stuff that is. But to see a new IP underperform is quite sad even if you’re not sold on it. I just wonder if they could’ve done something fairly simple and encouraged more people to give it a chance?

    #36 4 years ago
  37. Michael O’Connor

    If it took you that many tries and you still couldn’t beat the first boss Blerk, the problem here seriously isn’t with the game…

    #37 4 years ago
  38. Blerk

    I didn’t say that it was. And I’m not saying that I would’ve beaten it even if I had known where I was going wrong. But I’d have probably stood a much better chance.

    #38 4 years ago
  39. SplatteredHouse

    “Every level has its perfect gameplay style.”
    Oh no…It’s one of those, huh?
    /readies for line through
    /wavers

    @StolenGlory: “this is one of the core mechanics behind Bayonetta”
    How did you get beyond the first witch wall you encountered? With that, you either learn the technique, or be thrown back every time, until you have. Ninja Gaiden leaves scrolls on fallen (failed) ninjas and again, you learn the way, or you, essentially, don’t continue…They tell you what to do, then leave you to have at it.

    It seems as if you all, proponents of Vanquish, are saying that this is still the case in V, except, that there are no barriers to encounter if you’re “playing it wrong”. So, the game does nothing, either to inform you, or try to correct your errant approach – is that it?
    That it’s content for you to play it, and feel dissatisfied afterwards, and it’s on you, because you didn’t follow the studio’s covert, internal train of thought on its design – I have little surprise in the current result, if that’s the case.

    #39 4 years ago
  40. Michael O’Connor

    @39 “It seems as if you all, proponents of Vanquish, are saying that this is still the case in V, except, that there are no barriers to encounter if you’re “playing it wrong”.

    There is a barrier in Vanquish. You die.

    “That it’s content for you to play it, and feel dissatisfied afterwards, and it’s on you, because you didn’t follow the studio’s covert, internal train of thought on its design.”

    The game has plenty of versatility in how you can approach things, but you still have to use all the tools at your disposal. The opening boss, for instance, can be taken in about half a dozen different ways.

    To use an analogy I constantly fall back on to describe this game… why would you want to paint a rainbow using only one colour?

    #40 4 years ago
  41. No_PUDding

    I hate the game, but I respect the transparency of these PR types.

    I hope it’s a modesty that’d be present even if SEGA weren’t on hard times.

    #41 4 years ago
  42. JonFE

    Well, my impression of the demo matches Blerk’s on this one, but I’m willing to part with my hard-earned and be proven wrong…

    …once it hits the bargain bins… 8)

    #42 4 years ago
  43. SplatteredHouse

    “To use an analogy I constantly fall back on to describe this game… why would you want to paint a rainbow using only one colour?”

    I don’t have an analogy, but I do have this: A life bar, a life bar! Those are better, red, right. ;)

    “There is a barrier in Vanquish. You die.”
    Yes. But what should a player realise from that? They could just be using a poor choice of weapon, not be the right distance from the enemy – that feedback could be a signal of practically anything. It’s a catch-all, kill nothing method. Arguably, unsuitable in this particular case.

    #43 4 years ago
  44. StolenGlory

    ““There is a barrier in Vanquish. You die.”

    “Yes. But what should a player realise from that? They could just be using a poor choice of weapon, not be the right distance from the enemy – that feedback could be a signal of practically anything. It’s a catch-all, kill nothing method. Arguably, unsuitable in this particular case.”

    And just as arguably, skill and mastery of the game will mitigate the above to a greater extent.

    #44 4 years ago
  45. Michael O’Connor

    @43 It’s very easy to pick up on the signals.

    If I was killed in one shot, I should pay better attention to the audible and visual cues and speed dash out of the way of those super powerful attacks. If I get over-run by enemies, I shouldn’t run into that area so quickly.

    Etc. etc.

    Seriously, it blows my mind that someone couldn’t be the first boss. If you’re using cover, dodging when necessary, and making generous use of slow down, it’s not particularly hard.

    @44 Who wants skill and challenge in a game any more, SG? You’re talking crazy talk!

    #45 4 years ago
  46. SunKing

    I played the demo twice and thought it was okay. Nothing really popped out at me as anything particularly original, though. Either the demo is representative of the game and I just didn’t like it that much, or they messed up with the choice of level. And, also, if the game sells poorly, given that it’s got a high aggregate of scores, that will again likely be down to Sega’s marketing.

    Regardless, I’m not sold on it at full price. When it inevitably drops down to a more reasonable sub-twenty pounds, we can talk.

    #46 4 years ago

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