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Dragon Age 2 dialogue has three choices: Good, Nasty, or Badass

Friday, 23rd July 2010 20:06 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

dragonage2

We’ll take “badass” over “good” any day of the week.

BioWare’s on-hand at Comic Con this weekend, chatting about all things Dragon Age 2, and it looks like the game will not only contain improved graphics and a redefined combat experice, but a reworked dialogue system as well.

When choosing how to respond in the game, according to IGN, “good” will be marked with an olive branch, “nasty” with a Greek comedy mask, and “badass” denoted by a red fist.

During key points in a conversation, players will be able to let their companions handle the situation instead, allowing either Hawk or someone else to deal with a threat – like orcs, for example.

Depending on who you use, the orcs will be dispatched in one shot during a cut scene.

Sounds badass indeed.

Dragon Age 2′s slated for a March 2011 release on PC, PS3, and Xbox 360 with its first trailer hitting August 17 during gamescom.

Thanks, Eurogamer.

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20 Comments

  1. LordCancer

    thats badass yo!

    #1 4 years ago
  2. onlineatron

    I’m gonna be good throughout… and then right at the end, whack out a badass.

    Coz thatz how I roll yo.

    #2 4 years ago
  3. Phoenixblight

    @2

    I remember doing that on KOTOR after you find out who you really are. I pulled no punches after that moment.

    #3 4 years ago
  4. onlineatron

    @3

    Best moment in video-gaming for me.

    I was far too young to cotton on early like some did, so that twist blew my pre-teen mind.

    #4 4 years ago
  5. The Hindle

    @ 2 @ 3 + 10000

    #5 4 years ago
  6. DeSpiritusBellum

    I might just be old school, but I don’t really dig those conversation wheels.

    Granted it’s very few games that have had writing good enough to justify you picking your own lines, but picking one out of three “attitudes” rather than one out of three actual worded responses makes me feel like I’m making a gameplay decision, rather than participating in a coversation. It’s not real immersive.

    #6 4 years ago
  7. Phoenixblight

    @6

    What would you suggest? Have the game require a mic and then the game respond off of that? Not likely I don’t care what Milo thinks. Even in DAO or older games you were “making a gameplay decision” Usually it rolled a few variations into one or less results. It was just an illusion of more choices.

    #7 4 years ago
  8. MushroomStamp

    It’s better than old Zork days where you had to type in questions hoping to hit a keyword.

    #8 4 years ago
  9. endgame

    “I might just be old school, but I don’t really dig those conversation wheels.” u know I thought about that, and I still am. but Idk. maybe we should just wait and see with what they’ll come out. Bioware always surprised me in a good way.

    #9 4 years ago
  10. Old MacDonald

    Ok, now that sounds unbelievably bad. My initial optimism is beginning to wear off a bit now.

    #10 4 years ago
  11. DeSpiritusBellum

    @7 That’s the best alternative you can think of to a conversation wheel? Wow..

    Like I said the first time, I prefer a worded response, like the ones in Dragon Age. I prefer knowing what I’m going to say, rather than simply picking the effect I want it to have.

    The wheel strikes me as a conversation-for-dummies approach. Rather than engaging yourself in a conversation, you just press a button to be a badass or a saint.

    Everything you do in a game is gameplay, but just like games prefer to show you graphics, rather than the code that’s hiding behind it, good games ultimately seek to suspend your disbelief, and disguise the fact that all you’re really doing, is pressing buttons.

    #11 4 years ago
  12. hitnrun

    @10: Agreed. BioWare is really nailing down the awkward adolescent market lately. C’mon guys, you’re alone in your bedroom. No one’s watching. It’s OK to be good. Or evil. Or neutral! You don’t need to have everything couched in safely apathetic derision.

    @7: I think he was suggesting conversation trees. The difference is that wheels are meta-game button mashing, and trees offer role playing decisions. With wheels you don’t actually know what’s going to be said, or if you’d want “you” (or your character) to say it.

    Hardly anyone really plays a character “straight,” after all – sometimes you’d rather say something snarky or sinister or righteously indignant even if it brings your character outside the lines a bit.

    I think wheels have their place – they were certainly a blast in ME2 – but not in every game.

    #12 4 years ago
  13. Phoenixblight

    I read the interview on Game Informer and they found that the feedback from DAO people wanted a voiced character over the whole catatonic character response while the villiage is being decimated. I prefer my character having emotion and dramatic effect over reading text to find that best suits “me”

    DAO was a tribute to Balduar Gate days, they said in the interview thats not the case with the sequel. They want each part of the franchise telling a different story of Thedas each in a different way.

    Look at Witcher fantastic game and the responses had as much variety as Mass Effect.

    #13 4 years ago
  14. NiceFellow

    I’m getting so bored of this mechanic now. It either needs to show more complexity or go away for a holiday. I actually found this aspect of DA a chore – do I pick the obvious good or obvious bad answer.

    Mind you, I found it just as annoying in Mass Effect so maybe it’s just me.

    #14 4 years ago
  15. Daodan

    THIS NEWS IS FALSE, GUYS.

    Not your fault Stephany, IGN’s being the morons here. They somehow misunderstood during the exhibition. Check these quotes from some developers on the official forums:

    “We put up to 5 choice options and 5 investigate options per dialog node. There is also a difference between choices (where you are actually deciding something) and giving you the opportunity to express yourself in different ways (which I think is quite cool, but not something I believe we have released any details on yet).”
    – Craig Graff

    “I’m not really sure where the “there are only three options for dialog” impression they got came from. Perhaps it was when I showed one half of the dialog wheel with three options…which, you know, leaves another half open for…you know…other….options. *Shrug*

    Also probably worth noting that we’re not locked into specific icons per place in the wheel. Oh no. We have -much- more flexibility than that. We’re like gymnasts.”
    – Mike Laidlaw

    “I imagine that’s the only dialogue he saw? The demo is pretty action-packed and there’s only the one conversation– which, yes, has three options in it. As has been said elsewhere in this thread, however, that’s not all we’re limited to.

    The personality options (which the article mis-characterizes, I’m afraid– they may have been more his impression of the lines he saw rather than our explanation of them) have a bit more complexity as to what they affect. That’s probably part of a larger conversation, however, so we’ll talk about it at length later.”
    – David Gaider

    #15 4 years ago
  16. Phoenixblight

    @15

    Thanks sounds even more promising.

    #16 4 years ago
  17. DeSpiritusBellum

    @13 Well the fact that they voice every response in the new game after you pick the attitude, pretty much means they could just as easily have shown you what that response is, rather than simply showing its tone.

    The reason why they didn’t record voice for the Dragon Age responses was supposedly the wildly different characters you could create, which meant they’d need quite a few actors for the protagonist. It had nothing to do with the dialog system.

    I don’t see the depth and drama in picking an emote over an actual line myself, but people don’t seem too bothered with it, and I’m sure I’ll grin and bear it myself. I just think its annoying when your characters blurts stuff out that you’d never want him to say.

    #17 4 years ago
  18. Phoenixblight

    @17
    “The reason why they didn’t record voice for the Dragon Age responses was supposedly the wildly different characters you could create, which meant they’d need quite a few actors for the protagonist. It had nothing to do with the dialog system.”

    Partially correct they didn’t want to voice the characters because it would in turn limit the choices of the game. Developers said if they had voiced every character it would have less hours of gameplay than ME.

    “I don’t see the depth and drama in picking an emote over an actual line myself, but people don’t seem too bothered with it, and I’m sure I’ll grin and bear it myself. I just think its annoying when your characters blurts stuff out that you’d never want him to say.”

    I am not phased by this, adds a little surprise to it, I rather enjoyed how Mass Effect did it especially with ME 2 and how much dick or bitch Sheperd could be as a Renegade. Yeah it may or may not be the exact words I want but the choices I do make on the wheel are mine. This is Bioware’s story, they are the creator of these games and I have not been disappointed.

    TO each their own.

    #18 4 years ago
  19. BabylonChores

    False? Oh well, it was a beautiful dream!

    http://img718.imageshack.us/img718/367/goodbadassnasty.jpg

    #19 4 years ago
  20. Uncontested

    @15 Thank goodness.. I cant imagine every choice in the entire game being as dumbed down as “Good choice” “Bad Choice” or “BAD ASS MOFO CHOICE” (Because badassery is always exemplified by caps) I probably would not have bought the damn thing if they got that stupid with it.

    #20 4 years ago

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