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London Games Conference to “tackle biggest issues facing publishers and developers today”

Saturday, 12th September 2009 19:00 GMT By Stephany Nunneley

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Sony, Microsoft, Nintendo and the Shadow Minister for Culture have each been announced to speak at the London Games Conference on October 27 at BAFTA.

According to the press release, the conference “will tackle the biggest issues facing publishers and developers today: How to strengthen relationships with their playing customers and how to sell products to them in the years ahead through digital distribution.”

“I’m delighted to be speaking to the London Games Conference,” said Shadow Minister for Culture, Ed Vaizey. “The games sector is one of the most successful creative industries in the UK, but it has been forgotten by Government. While Canada and France aggressively compete to attract games talent, all UK politicians talk about is video games violence.

“Yet this sector should be a dream for a politician – it recruits people qualified in difficult subjects, like maths and computer science; it’s regional, with clusters all over the country; and it’s successful and world-beating. Government backing for the games sector should be a no-brainer.”

Andy Payne, chair of ELSPA, Phil Harrison, Edge editor Tony Mott and Intent MD Stuart Dinsey are all expected to chair panels during the conference.

Full press release through the break.

Thanks, GoNintendo.

Sony, Microsoft, Nintendo and the Shadow Minister for Culture will all speak at the inaugural London Games Conference taking place on 27 October 2009 at BAFTA. The conference will tackle the biggest issues facing publishers and developers today: how to strengthen relationships with their playing customers and how to sell products to them in the years ahead through digital distribution.

The conference will concentrate on life beyond the traditional retail environment, exploring the potential of online distribution and the necessity of games companies to get closer to their playing customers.

The conference will be opened by Shadow Minister for Culture, Ed Vaizey: “I’m delighted to be speaking to the London Games Conference. The games sector is one of the most successful creative industries in the UK, but it has been forgotten by Government. While Canada and France aggressively compete to attract games talent, all UK politicians talk about is video games violence.

“Yet this sector should be a dream for a politician – it recruits people qualified in difficult subjects, like maths and computer science; it’s regional, with clusters all over the country; and it’s successful and world-beating. Government backing for the games sector should be a no-brainer.”

London Games Conference is officially backed by ELSPA and is part of London Games Festival (LGF09). ELSPA director general Mike Rawlinson commented: “Digital distribution is one of the major challenges facing all sectors of the business today and the London Games Conference will be a vital forum for discussion and information on this crucial topic. ELSPA is delighted to be supporting the event as an official partner and we’re sure LGC will be incredibly useful for all our members.”

Andy Payne, chair of ELSPA, industry legend Phil Harrison, Edge editor Tony Mott and Intent MD Stuart Dinsey are all set to chair panels during the conference. Sessions will include an examination of the current digital distribution landscape, a focus on the future ambitions of the hardware platforms and an exploration of sectors and companies that are already working closely with their playing public.

The conference is being held at BAFTA on 27 October 2009, beginning at 4pm. It will be followed by an evening of networking drinks and dinner. Tickets are priced at £229 but are available until 18 September at the Early Bird rate of £199.

The event is organised by Intent Media. Stuart Dinsey, Intent’s managing director commented, “At the heart of this conference is an issue which needs to be grasped by every company within our community. The days of being once removed from the playing public is over. Companies need to be closer to their customers. For some that may mean selling directly, for other it may mean a subscription model but without doubt every company needs to have a direct line of communication with their followers. The London Games Conference will examine the best models, the future plans of major players as well as the pitfalls for companies not embracing this change.”

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