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EEDAR and Nielsen get to provide games ad-tracking data

Tuesday, 10th February 2009 09:40 GMT By Patrick Garratt

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EEDAR and Nielsen have teamed up to provide “detailed analysis of historical marketing campaigns in the video game industry,” the pair announced this morning.

Nearly $1 billion was spent in marketing game in the US last year. The new partnership is aimed at providing insight into what works and what doesn’t. There is a recession going on, after all.

“EEDAR is very pleased to work with The Nielsen Company – one of the most trusted names in marketing research,” said EEDAR boss, Gregory Short.

“The integration of Monitor-Plus marketing data and creative assets into EEDAR technologies will redefine how the video game industry can analyze and best leverage the pivotal role marketing plays in the consumer purchase process.”

Press release after the break.

Carlsbad, CA., February 10, 2009 – Electronic Entertainment Design and Research (EEDAR), a business intelligence and research firm specializing in the video game industry, today announced the establishment of a long term agreement with The Nielsen Company to provide detailed analysis of historical marketing campaigns in the video game industry.

In 2008 more than $823 million was spent in the promotion of video game titles in the United States (Source: Nielsen Monitor-Plus). With current economic conditions now affecting even the recession-resistant video game industry, this collaboration between EEDAR and The Nielsen Company will deliver the critical insights necessary for maximizing the money invested in the marketing efforts of future game titles.

Information from Nielsen’s industry leading Monitor-Plus advertising monitoring service will be integrated with EEDAR’s proprietary database of video game features, or “Game DNA”, covering more than eight thousand historical game titles. The combined data will be delivered via EEDAR’s GamePulse™ and DesignMetrics™ services, marking a new era in both the ease of accessibility and depth of analysis possible from examining historical and future video game marketing campaigns.

“EEDAR is very pleased to work with The Nielsen Company – one of the most trusted names in marketing research” said EEDAR Executive Chairman, Gregory Short. “The integration of Monitor-Plus marketing data and creative assets into EEDAR technologies will redefine how the video game industry can analyze and best leverage the pivotal role marketing plays in the consumer purchase process.”

Using EEDAR technologies, marketing campaign data, including total estimated spend and mixed media allocation, can be contextualized as broadly as industry or genre wide trends, or as granularly as individual video game titles. The agreement also empowers EEDAR clients to view digital versions of historical print and TV advertisements, thereby increasing the efficiency by which video game marketers and creative agencies can research best-practices and advance innovation in their field. Subscribers to EEDAR’s web-based GamePulse™ information service will be able to access this new marketing campaign data in March, 2009.

In addition to providing these insights via the GamePulse™ web service, EEDAR will also now leverage historical marketing campaign data and identify current trends as part of their world-leading sales projection and risk analysis service for video games: DesignMetrics™.

“The combination of Nielsen market intelligence with EEDAR’s games metrics and analysis will be a valuable resource that will enable games publishers to make more informed decisions regarding the $823 million spent promoting video game titles,” said Enid Maran, Vice President of New Business Development, Media Services for The Nielsen Company.

Attendees of the 2009 D.I.C.E summit, to be held in Las Vegas February 17-20, will have the opportunity for an exclusive “hands-on” sneak-peek at the results of the Nielsen and EEDAR data analyses via GamePulse™ kiosks available in the D.I.C.E lounge at the event.

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