Sections

Apogee Software’s return brings Duke Nukem trilogy to DS and PSP

Monday, 14th July 2008 14:05 GMT By Mike

Apogee Software just confirmed its return to the scene by announcing the full Duke Nukem Trilogy for DS and PSP.

“Apogee Software is producing the Trilogy under an exclusive license agreement with 3D Realms and MachineWorks Northwest LLC. The Trilogy is comprised of three episodes: Critical Mass, Chain Reaction, and Proving Grounds.

“This marks a new beginning for a famous publisher with a history of market-making innovation,” said Apogee boss Terry Nagy. “I can’t think of a better character than Duke or a better franchise than the Trilogy to usher in a new era for Apogee.”

Full press release after the drop.

By Mike Bowden

Legendary Apogee Returns to Action

The publisher that pioneered episodic gaming and online distribution is back.

Dallas, Texas – July 14, 2008 – Apogee Software is back to re-establish itself as an innovative leader in interactive entertainment. Apogee is reviving some of its legacy catalogue of 30+ releases as well as publishing all-new properties in collaboration with diverse creators and developers.

Apogee is bringing the King of Action himself, Duke NukemTM, to the handheld console market with three new missions, together called the Duke Nukem TrilogyTM. Apogee Software is producing the Trilogy under an exclusive license agreement with 3D Realms and MachineWorks Northwest LLC. The Trilogy is comprised of three episodes: Critical MassTM, Chain ReactionTM, and Proving GroundsTM.

“This marks a new beginning for a famous publisher with a history of market-making innovation,” said Terry Nagy, co-founder and Chief Operating Officer of Apogee. “I can’t think of a better character than Duke or a better franchise than the Trilogy to usher in a new era for Apogee.”

“It’s funny how what’s old is new again in this industry,” remarked Apogee co-founder, Scott Miller. “Many of the things Apogee pioneered are back in style, so it only makes sense to bring back Apogee and its properties with a visionary team that will once again create innovation for gamers around the world.”
Apogee pioneered the shareware game revolution in 1987 by inventing the concept of game demos, distributed online, which advertised the remaining episodes in a series. Before this time, game demos and episodic releases were unheard of. These concepts created by Apogee have become mainstream today. Apogee’s amazing history includes the original releases of Commander KeenTM (1990), Duke NukemTM (1991), Wolfenstein 3-DTM (1992), RaptorTM (1993), and Rise of the TriadTM (1994), just to name a few.

About Apogee
Apogee Software, LLC, is a privately held Texas company, with a core team of industry experts in game development, publishing, and distribution. Apogee builds franchises around original IP, developing and publishing content for retail and digital distribution on next-generation consoles, the PC, and mobile platforms. For more information, please visit www.apogeesoftware.com

For Apogee Software, LLC
Terry Nagy, COO
email: info@apogeesoftware.com

Latest

11 Comments

  1. Tiger Walts

    We need a release of RotT!

    #1 6 years ago
  2. SplatteredHouse

    I wonder if this will be third-person (like Zero Hour, and the original DNs), or, first, like the more well-known titles?

    The front page of their website has some additional information, including a features list, and the expectation that “The Trilogy” will start being released, in order, in Summer, of next year.

    #2 6 years ago
  3. Blerk

    I spent hours in our Uni labs playing the original Duke Nukem games. Then we discovered Wolfenstein 3D and that was that. :-D

    Splattered, the original Duke games were 2D side-scrolling platform games.

    @Tiger Walts: RotT was mental. All I can remember is skinny characters, loads of fast-firing guns and bouncing like fucking pogo-sticks on those pads. :-D

    #3 6 years ago
  4. Blerk

    So it looks like those Duke Nukem 3D for XBLA rumours might be true, then. :-D

    #4 6 years ago
  5. SplatteredHouse

    Sure, Blerk; but they weren’t first-person perspective, so they were clearly viewed from the third-person?
    I had a go on them, on one of the PC bonus eds of DN3D.
    I didn’t stick with playing those older games for long, though. :)

    #5 6 years ago
  6. Blerk

    Well, I suppose technically you could call them third-person, but the term doesn’t really make much sense outside of a 3D game – bit difficult to do a first-person 2D game, after all. :-)

    I’d agree that they’re not going to hold peoples attention for long these days, but these are three ‘all new’ episodes so they’ve got plenty of opportunity to rejig stuff for a modern audience. Maybe.

    #6 6 years ago
  7. SplatteredHouse

    Your term sounds the better. They could do something like The Manhattan Project, in terms of structure, on a PSP, I’m guessing? I’ll be looking forward to seeing what this looks like.

    #7 6 years ago
  8. Tiger Walts

    If that’s all you remember Blerk then you obviously never found the mushroom pickup or the god mode pickup.

    #8 6 years ago
  9. Blerk

    Oh god – ‘Shrooms’. It’s all coming back to me now.

    Including the fact that actually it was a bit crap. :-D

    #9 6 years ago
  10. Tiger Walts

    Crap but fun.

    #10 6 years ago
  11. Blerk

    I think I’ve got it here somewhere. I might see if it runs on DOSBox.

    #11 6 years ago

Comments are now closed on this article.